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Full text of "Family Computing Magazine Issue 29"

PUBLISHED BY ■■ BCHCICASTIC INC. 



JANUARY 1986 V^. 



VOLUME 4 
NUMBER 1 



Building Hbur Sof tvrure Library 



How to Set Up Your Finances 



Modems: A Buyer's Guide to the 

Computer/Phone 

Hookup 



Hands On: 
How to Enha 
YourSysti^ 



Plus: 

JC-Power \ 
for Kids 



ESrSIDE: 

ORIGINAL PROGRAMS 
FOR ADAM, APPLE, ATARI, 
COMMODORE. IBM PC ~" 
AND COMPATIBLES, 
MACINTOSH, TANDY 
COCO AND MODEL 4. 



SPECIAL BONUS: 
ROCK 'N' ROLL 
PROGRAM! 



01 



V6956"U0D8" 



Professional-Level 
Power 



Consumer Reports says: 

"The Best Buy among the IBM- 
compatibles is the Leading 
Edge Model "D". If comes 
with a high-resolution monitor 
and the circuitry necessary fo 

display very sharp text as well 
as monochrome and color 
graphics. And it has enough 
ports and expansion slots to 
build just about any com- 
puter system you might want 
in the future." 



M495 



A 




QtO 

Price for Everyone 



A 



The Leading Edge Model D Personal Computer 
Full IBM Compatibiliry. $1495. Complete. — 



The Model "D" is available at most tine computer stores. 
Call us for ttie one near you. 1-800-343-6833 or (617) 828-8150 

Leading Edge Hardware Products Inc., 225 Turnpike Street, Canton, MA 02021 

U-adiiii: EiJgt in j rcarMcrcd innlciiKirk ollxvuliiiL! i-IJgt PpikJiilIn. Inc IHM is ,i ii'insk-rfd iMik-iii;irk ,.t liiu'in.iii,,,,.,! |i,iMiiL-N> M.uhiticv Inf. 




If the sticker on your printer reads like this, 

youVe been stuck. 



Too nianv big-winded printer companies 
are sticliing it to too many unsuspecting 
consumers. Malting a lot of noise about fea- 
tures that aren't featured at all. 

It's lime to strike back at the stickers. And 
sticker shock. 

THE STAR SG-10 

U2KBUFFER STANDARD 

m W0% IBM-compatible STANDARD 

m ADJUSTABLE TRACTOR .... STANDARD 

m HEX DUMP STANDARD 

m ITALICS STANDARD 

m NEAR-LETTER-QUALITY . . . STANDARD 
n RETAILPRICE $299 




The SG-10 printer from Star Micronics 
includes as standard many of the attractive 
features which Epson's" LX-90 and the 
Okidata" ML-182 charge extra for Or don't 
offer at all. 

The Star SG-10 is faster than the Epson 
and more IBM'^-compatihlc. And unlike 
the Okidata, the SG-U) features dual-mode 
printing— draft and NLQ— at no extra charge. 

The SG-10 offers more at less cost— or 
much more for the same price— than its two 
leading competitors. 

So, if you'd rather be struck by a sticker 
thai makes great .sense than stuck with a 
sticker that makes nonsense, look into the 
SG-10 today. At vour local Star dealer. 




mi«ronics 

THE POWER BEHIND THE PRINTED WORD* 



• Epson is a registerMT trademart,firKp!w>Ti America. Inc. * IBM is a regisiered iradcmirii of InitrnMional Business Machines, Inc. »OVid8l«lsB rt^Jlucred trademark ofOhidala.an OKI AMERICA company 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 50 



HOW TO GET 
OVER $2000 WORTH OF NEW 
CAPABILITIES FOR YOUR 
COIVil 




OR $599 



The Spartan'" is the Apple'" 11+ emulator for your Commodore 64'" that will open 
up a whole new world of hardware and software for you I Imagine adding these 
features to your Commodore 64'" for the Spartan™ price of S599: □ Apple™ 11 + 
hardware and software capabilities D 64K RAM expansion D four 
software selectable Commodore 64'" cartridge slots □ non-dedicated 8-bit 
parallel port D standard audio cassette deck capabilities for your C-64"". 
The suggested retail value of comparable products offering only these i 
capabilities is over $2200.00* — but the Spartan™ gives you much, much ' 
more! By building on your investment in your Commodore 64'" — an 
excellent introductory computer — - you create a whole new system 
with both C-64'" and Apple'" II + capabilities. There is a whole other 
worid out there! The huge selection of Apple'" 11+ hardware and 
software is now yours to explorel Call toll free for the Spartan '" 

dealer nearest you. | ^ 



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FOR INFORMATION WRITE: 

MIMIC SYSTEMS INC. 

1112 FORT ST., FL. 6G 
VICTORIA, B.C. 
CANADA V8V 4V2 



'AJI pticet quoted are In U.S. funas. rreighl dnd (axes not included Value oi componems equival^ 
10 tt» Spartan ' syilem are quoted from Apple" 11+ CPUand AppJe" II 4. single disk drive 1983 
tUI prices. onO (rom current suggested list prices and component spectficollon! or ottief 
ponptioral rTionulocturera. Comtnodoro 64 ■ ond Commodore logo ore trademarki ot 
Cofflnrodore Electronics Ltd. ond or Connvadore Business Moctiines. tr>C- Appie ' tl + IJ a 
tradotmirk of Apple CompuTer Inc Sportorr ■ is Q trodemark ol filmic Systems \no. and tras 
no association witti Commodore EiectrofiJcs or Appie Computer inc. The Sparfon- is 
manufociurea Oy Mimic Systems inc under license granted by AIG (ieclronics inc. o) 

victono.BC. Canada. 



TO ORDER CALL: 

1-800-MODULAR 

(663-8527) 
CIRCLE READER SERVICE 33 



PUBLISHED BY SCHOLASTIC INC. 



JANUARY 
1986 



FAMILY 



VOLUME 4 
NUMBER 1 




FEAYURES 



PROGRAMMING 



DEPARTMENTS 



35 

SETTING UP YOUR 

SOFTWARE LIBRARY 

by David Hallerman 

What software should 
you buy? Use these recom- 
mendations from our crit- 
ics to build a well-rounded 
software library your whole 
family can enjoy and grow 
with In the years to come. 

PLUS: A DIRECTOFft' OF SOFT- 
WARE PICKS 

ai 

HOW TO KEEP YOUR 
COMPUTER HEALTHY 

by George DeLucenay 
Leon 

Get the best performance 
out of your computer by 
heeding the seven laws of 
preventive medicine. 

45 

HELPFUL HINTS 

Inexpensive ways to im- 
prove your system while 
adding that personal 
touch. 

46 

BUYER'S GUIDE TO 

MODEMS 

by Nick Siillivan 

Start with the basic 
questions — everything you 
always wanted to know 
about hooking your com- 
puter to the phone lines. 
Then move on to our 
roundup of 300-, 1200-, 
and 2400-baud modems. 



50 
HANDS ON 

by Henry Beechhold 

Do-it-yourself enhance- 
ments to expand your com- 
puter into a supersystem. 
Third in a six-part series. 



52 



COMPUTING FAMILY OF 
THE YEAR CONTEST 

Don't miss the chance to 
win a complete computer 
system, peripherals, soft- 
ware, and more. Enter 
your family in our second 
annua! contest! 



K.POWER 

77 

Making it as a 

Computer Consuitcmt 

The ins and outs of set- 
ting up a business while 
you're still in school. 

80 

Girls Just Want to 

Compute 

Our new opinion column 
airs one high schooler's 
views on girls at the key- 
board. 

82 

Game Strategies 

Tips, tricks, and hints 
on playing your favorite 
games. 

84 
Micretenes 

Twist and turn while 
your computer plays Old- 
Time Rock n' Roil. 



55 

THE PROGRAMMER 

56 

TIPS TO THE TYPIST 

57 

PRESCHOOL PROGRAM 

Give your toddler a real 
computer experience with 
Baby Box. For Adam, Ap- 
ple & Macintosh. Atari. 
Commodore & "VIC-20, IBM 
PC & compatibles, and 
Tandy CoCo & Model 4. 

60 

ARCADE GAME 

Compete for the gold 
with Happy Hardier, a 
fast-action sports game for 
Apple, Atari and Com- 
modore. 

70 

PRODUCTIVITY 

PROGRAM 

Put your (lies on disk 
with Home Information 
Manager, a mini-data-base 
program for the IBM PC 
& PCjr. 

70 

PROGRAMMING P.S. 



WHArS IN STORE 

87 

NEW HARDWARE 

88 

SOFTWARE GUIDE AND 

REVIEWS 

Twenty-four at-a-glance 




EDITOR'S NOTE 

7 
LETTERS 

8 

HOME-SCHOOL 

CONNECTION 

by Anne E. LaForge 

Computers on campus — 
replacing t>'pewriters. but 
not teachers. 

PLUS: SHOULD YOU BRING A 
COMPUTER TO COLLEGE? 

16 

HOME/MONEY 

MANAGEMENT 

by Nick Sullivan 

Use your computer to 
help you organize your fi- 
nances. 

26 
GAMES 

by James Delson 

The 20 best games of 
1985. 

32 

COMPUTING CLINIC 

98 
CLASSIFIED 

100 

ADVERTISERS' INDEX 



FAMILi" COMPLTING (ISStsf 0736-60791 Is pi^J- 
llsbid monthl>- by SchdasUc Inc., 730 Broadway. 
New York. NY 10003. Subscriptions: In ihc tf.S. 
and possessions. 12 issues for 819.97: oulslde 
Ihc U,5, add &6 laurfacr mall) Of 825,97 lair- 
main. Office of publication: 351 Ganxr Hd., P.O. 
Elox 2700. Monroe. OH 45050-270O, Sccond- 
cIa»A po5(afie paid ai Monroc. OH 45050-9996 
and addlliona] officrs, POSTMASTER: Send ad- 
dress, chanties and nocicc of iindHlvrrcd copies 
(0 FAMlliCOMPLTlNC. P.O. Box 2511. Boulder, 
CO 8O302. Printed m U.S.A. Capyrt^jht C- 1985 
by Scholastic Inc. AU rlRhts r«ervcd. 



COVEH PHOrOCRAint liV /\NTHO\Y LEOr-V 




EDITOR'S NOTE 

THE 

GROWING 

FAMILY 



Just about the time this issue drops 
into your mailbox or reaches the 
newsstand, there'll be a lot of com- 
puter-counting. Will the Christmas 
season have delivered the buying 
public or not? Thafs the count. But 
it's not all that counts. 

While all the teeth-gnashing and 
hand-wringing has been going on, 
with other magazines swinging from 
one branch of the computing tree to 
another, we've been steadily enhanc- 
ing our family nest. And our family's 
been growing. 

Even since the last issue, when I 
reported that our circulation was 
just over 400,000, the number has 
gone up. Now it's 410,000, with an 
actual readership of nearly 1.7 mil- 
lion adult readers, plus 1.3 million 
teens. And, we hope, the numbers 
are still growing. What's causing 
this growth, seemingly against the 
tide of the Industry and of other 
magazines? 

Ordinarily. I'd resist trying to fig- 
ure it out — at least publicly — but 
what better time for stock-taking 
than the New Year? So here it is: 

FAMILY COMPUTING has, from its be- 
ginning, maintained a commitment 
to the vision families have for the 
computer — as a tool that will help 
their members learn; earn; use time, 
money, and other resources more ef- 
fectively; and share their experiences 
with one another, thereby enhanc- 
ing the family as a whole. We have 
viewed that commitment as a dedi- 
cation to the long view, of the com- 
puter as a means of improving our 
lives, of changing the way we do 
things, and of extending our abili- 
ties, talents, and capacities through 
its use. 

In our view of computing, home is 
the hub. It is the junction where 



school and work and fun meet. And, 
as a result, there are no limits. No 
limits of use, no limits of machines, 
no limits of ability. To meet the 
needs of our families of readers, we 
present them with the full range of 
options — both for use and for prod- 
ucts. From the beginning, we resist- 
ed proddlngs to limit ourselves to 
home computers — we were Instead 
concerned with computing In the 
home. 

From the beginning, we have been 
dedicated to breaking down barri- 
ers — all of them artificial — of age, oc- 
cupation, race, sex, and place. That 
Is what we must do to bring about 
successful computing in the family. 
The men and women in our families 
must know success, as well as the 
boys and girls, the young and old, 
members of the work force and stu- 
dents, all engaged in a wide variety 
of computer activities, no matter 
where. While you, our readers, are 
devoted Immediately to the good of 
the small family unit, ultimately we 
share the large concern of the future 
of us all. 




-.dr^-f- 



CLAUDIA COHL 
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

P.S. Last year we initiated our 
Computing Family of the Year Con- 
test. The Mancinis of Long Island, 
New York, were 1985"s winning fam- 
ily. Kate Mancini's account of the 
ways In which the computer has 
changed the lives of her family mem- 
bers earned them the grand prize. 
This year, it could be your family 
that wins. Don't miss contest details 
on page 52. 



■CHOLASnC INC. CORPORAYIt 

Maurice R. Rahlnson. founder. !895-1982 

PRESIDENT. CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER. AND CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD; Richard Robinson 

VICE-CHAIRMAN OF THE B0.y?D EMERITUS: Jack K. Llppert 

NATIOMAl APVII«RT COUNCILt Dr. Sidney F Marland, Jr.. chairman, former superintendent of schools and 
U.S. Commissioner of Education • Dr. Gregory Anrtg. president. Educational Testing Service • Elaine Banks, past 
president. National Association of Elemenlary School Principals • Michael J. Guerre, executive dlrecior. sccondarv' 
schools. National CathollcEducatlonal Association (Or. Lola Jane May. muthematlcs consultant, Wlnnctka, Illinois, 
public schools • Dr. Wilson Riles, former superintendent of public Inslriictlon. Slaie Department of Education, 
California • Dr. Richard Ruopp, president. Bank Street College of Education, New York, New York • Patay R. Scales, 
library and media specialist. Greenville (South Carollnal Middle School • Elaine Stelnkemeyer. president. The 
National PTA 



FAMILY ° 
COMPUTINC 

730 Broadway, New York. NY 10003 

(212) 505-3580 

EOrrOB-iN-cHiEF: Claudia Cohl 

DESIGN DiHEcrroH: Vincent Cecl 



EBITORIAL 

SENIOR EDrroR: Nlck SuUlvan 

MANAGING EDITOR: Roxanc FaiTTianfannalan 

REVIEWS EDrroR; DavId Hallennan 

ASsisTA.vr EDITOR: Suzeue Harvey 

COPY AND RESEARCH ASSISTANTS: KarcH Kane, 

Elizabeth Oakes 

ADMINISTRATIVE COORDINATOR: (Mlncrva Jlmencz 

CONTHIBLTTING EDITORS: Jeffrey Bairstow, 

James Delson, Peter Favaro Ph.D.. Karla Flsk. 

Charles H. Gajeway, Sarah Kortum, 

Anne Krueger, Tony Morris. Robin Raskin 

K-rav.T.R ASSISTANTS; DavId Langendocn, 

Damon Osgood, Alex Shakar 

ART 

DESiG.v ASSOCIATE: James C. Montalbano 

DESIGN ASSISTANTS; 

Doreen Maddox, Susan Taylor, Stephen E. WUcox 

TICHHICAL 

TECHNICAL DIRECTOR; Lancc Paavola 

TECH.'JiCALEDrros: John Jalnschlgg 

ASSOCIATE TECHNICAL EDtTOH: Joey Latimer 

ASSOCIATE TECHNICAL EDrTOR/UAU SUPERVISOR: 

Steven CM. Chen 

TECHNICAL .'&SISTANTS: Maureen Bruno, 

Susan Easum, Howard Kong 



PUBLISHIMG 

PUBLISHER; Shlrrel Rhoades 

CONTROLLER: Robert H. BcKone 

PRODUCTION MANAGER; Davld J. Langc 

CIRCULATION DIRECTOR; DfiCde DiCkSOn 
CIRCULATION MANAGER; SlCVCtl R. Aster 

FULFILLMENT MANAGER: Robln Andrews 

pROMOTioNPRODucTioN COORDINATOR: Patrlcla Neal 

CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE: Maria Giresl 

ASSISTANT TO THE jiiBLisHER: Elizabeth Monaghan 

ABVERTISING SALES OFFICES 

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER- 

Paul W. Reiss (2121 505-3585 

ASSOCIATE ADVERTISING DIRECTOR: 

Bruce Gardner (2121 505-3588 

EASTERN REPRESENTATIVE: 

Jonathan Wolpert (212) 505-3628 

SOUTHA'ESTERN HEPRF.SENTATIVEt 

Jim Bender 

1201 1 San Vicente Blvd., Suite 302 

Los Angeles, CA 90049 

12131 471-3455 

NORTHWESTERN REPRESENTATIVE: 

Pamela Taylor 

480 California Ave.. Suite 203 

Palo Alto. CA 94306 

(415)322-1015 

NATIONAL SALES ASSIST.ANT: 

Susan Pienkos (2121 505-3630 

RESEARCHPROMOTION' ASSISTANT: 

MlUlcent Callender 

TELEHARKCTING UIRECTOH 

Greg Rapport (212) 505-3587 

TELEMARKETING REPHESEOTATIVES: 

Carol Grazlano (2121 505-3620 

Sharon E. Sullivan (212) 505-3629 

Steven Turner (213) 471-3455 



NEED SUBSCRIPTION ASSISTAMCET 

Please send change of address to FAMILY 
COMPUTING, RO. Box 2511, Boulder, CO 
80302. For other problems, call (800) 525-0643 
and please have a copy of your canceled check 
and mailing label handy. 



4 FAMILY COMPUTING 



Arrays, Inc./ Continental Software 




IHE HOME ACCOUN TANT 

and Financial Planner for the Macintosh' 




IT'S AS SIMPLE AS USING YOURFINGERS AND TOES ... 



Over a quarter of a million people have used THE HOME 
iCCOUNTANT to master their persona! finances and gain 
)etter control over how they spend their money. Now, to 
omplement the power and ease of use of the Macintosh , 
urays, Inc./Continental Software has developed THE HOME 



ACCOUNTANT and FINANCIAL PLANNER for the 
MACINTOSH. This program, designed from the ground up for 
the Mac, is simple enough for a child to use, yet powerful 
enough to handle the most complicated personal or small 
business accounting requirements. 



Arrays, Inc./ 

Continental 

Software 

6711 Valjean Avenue • Van Nuys, California 91406 • (818) 994-1699 
CIRCLE READER SERVICE 4 




MANAGING YOUR CHECKBOOK? 

MANAGING YOUR BUDGET? 

MANAGING YOUR BILLS? 

MANAGING YOUR CASH FLDW? 

MANAGING YOUR TAXES? 

MANAGING YOUR INSURANCE? 

MANAGING YOUR STOCKS? 

MANAGING YOUR BONDS? 

MANAGING YOUR REAL ESTATE? 

MANAGING YOUR TAX SHELTERS? 

MANAGING YOUR SAVINGS? 

MANAGING YOUR MORTGAGE? 

MANAGING YOUR AUTO LOAN? 

MANAGING YOUR RETIREMENT? 

MANAGING YOUR CALENDAR? 

MANAGING YOUR CHARGE ACCOUNTS? 

MANAGING YOUR CAPITAL GAINS? 

MANAGING YOUR ANNUITIES? 

MANAGING YOUR APPOINTMENTS? 

MANAGING YOUR DIVIDENDS? 

MANAGING YOUR INTEREST? 

MANAGING YOUR RECORDS? 

MANAGING YOUR VALUABLES? 

MANAGING YOUR KEOGH'S? 

MANAGING YOUR IRAS? 



MANAGING YOUR MONEY* 
BY ANDREW TOBIAS. 
THE ONLY FINANCIAL 
SOFTWARE THAT DOES IT ALL. 




©1935. MECA. 285 RIVERSIDEAVENUE.WESrPain.CT 06880.1203)222.1000. For IBM PC. Xt AT, PCjr I2S6KITANDY1200HD,TANDV1000(256K1. APPLE lie, llc(-|28K.TWODrive5) 

CIRCLE READER SERVICE 31 



LETTERS 



ALL SOLD OUT 

I'm trying to buy a new printer. 1 
have a special one in mind, Okida- 
ta's Okimate 20. I've found some 
dealers, but they were all sold out. 
Do you know of any dealers who 
would have this printer? 

SONG KANG 

Alexandria, Virginia 

EDITOR'S NOTE: If the dealers in your 
area do not have the product you 
want io buy in stock, try calling the 
manufacturer, who will often be 
able to tell you where you may 
have better luck. You can write to 
Okidata at 532 Fellowship Road, 
ML Laurel, New Jersey 08054, or 
call (800) OKIDATA. In addition, 
since you know exactly what you 
want, look at mail-order ads. You'll 
probably save money in the short 
run, but you might miss the conve- 
nience of having a local dealer to 
turn to if you need repairs or ser- 
vice. We suggest you read "Mail-Or- 
der Made Safe" on page 97 before 
taking the plunge. 

PROGRAMS FOR THE C 128 

You claim you are publishing pro- 
grams that will run on the Commo- 
dore 128. This is true, though mis- 
leading. 1 own a C 128 system and 
eveiy program you publish for it is a 
Commodore 64 program that will 
run on the C 128, as will any C 64 
software, no matter what the format. 
Will you publish any programs for 
the computer in C 128 mode? The 
graphics and sound capabilities are 
tremendous and easy to implement, 
far surpassing those of the C 64. 
And the lack of the C 64's peeks and 
POKES makes it a dream to program. 

VINCE HATFTELD 

Port Orchard. Washington 

EDITOR'S NOTE; We. too. are im- 
pressed by the C 128's capabilities 
and sophistication. However, there 
is still a relatively small installed 
base ofC 128s. and a huge one of 
C 64s. At this time, we feel our only 
option is to carry programs that run 
on both machines. Of course, we're 
interested in seeing what the C 128 
can do. so if you have a good pro- 
gram specifically in C 128 mode, 
we'd love to see it. 

COMPLETELY HOOKED! 

I've been receiving family computing 
for one year now. and I'm hooked! 



How do you do it? family computing 
isn't like all of the other boring com- 
puter magazines. It's exciting! I've 
had to order two subscriptions be- 
cause after I get almost done with 
one, it's in tatters. Also, I have rea- 
son to suspect that the postman 
reads it. 1 especially like the pro- 
grams in the magazine. I type them 
all into my Commodore 64 at home 
and save them on my family comput- 
ing disk. I even made a menu pro- 
gram for them! It's hard to keep the 
magazine away from the rest of my 
family long enough for me to read it! 
Your magazine's way up there with 
TIME on my list! I only wish you'd 
manufacture it a bit stronger. 

KEVIN CHAMBERS 

Duiuth, Minnesota 

THE FRANKLIN IS BACK 

I read your magazine and soon I will 
be getting a computer, the Franklin 
1000. 1 was wondering if you could 
find some information on this ma- 
chine. If you could, it would be 
I greatly appreciated, Your magazine 
is the greatest of all. 

MICHAEL W. KOKEEN 

N. Huntington, Pennsylvania 

EDITOR'S NOTE: According to Franklin 
Computer Corp.. the Franklin Ace 
1000 is no longer on the market. A 
new model, the Franklin Ace 2000. 
however, is being sold, and Frank- 
lin says it's compatible with 95 per- 
cent of Apple software. For more in- 
formation, check out this month's 
hardware section of What's In 
Store. 



CORRECTION 

In the November family computing ar- 
ticle. "Word Processors: New Tools 
for an Age-Old Task." we published 
an incorrect rating for the Atari ver- 
sion of Paperclip by Batteries In- 
cluded. The overview for file-han- 
dling, printer functions, and 
documentation should have been a 
rating of excellent. 



FAMILY coMPLiTiNC looks fonvard to letters 
from all our readers. Please direct your 
correspondence [o: Letters to the Editor. 
FAMILY COMPLTING, 730 Bwadway, New 
York. NY 10003. Include your name, 
address, and phone number. We reserue 
(he right to edit letters for length and 
clarity. Due to the large volume of mail 
we receive, we are not able to respond 
personally to every letter. 



MANAGING 
YOUR MONEY- 
IS NOW 
AVAILABLE ON 
APPLE 
lie AND He. 



Special 
Introductory Edition! 

Contains both 5Va" and 
new3V2"UniDisk3.5 
disk formats 



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APPLE He, lie (12BK, aO-Column Monitor, Two Drives! 

JANUARY 1986 7 



HOME-SCHOOL CONNECTION 

COMPUTERS ON CAMPUS 

Replacing Typewriters, But Not Teachers 



BY ANN E. LAFORGE 



When I was in college, most human- 
ities students thought of computers 
as strange machines hidden deep 
within the science building, where 
few of us ever ventured. We knew 
that they existed, but had only 
vague ideas of their use. and cer- 
tainly didn't dream we'd ever own or 
operate them ourselves. 

I trekked back to Boston this past 
spring for my fifth-year reunion. 
There I overheard Journalism majors 
extolling the virtues of word process- 
ing and graduate management stu- 
dents speaking about IBM PCs as 
though they were calculators. On my 
sentimental journey through the li- 
brary, I was stopped in my tracks by 
a fleet of Apple lis. docked firmly 
where the card catalog used to be. 

Clearly, what has happened in the 
few short years since 1 left the halls 
of higher education is nothing short 
of a revolution. Colleges and univer- 
sities have become serious about 
preparing all of their students — not 
just the science/math specialists — 
for the computerized world outside 
the classroom. Today, anyone who is 
entering college or preparing for 
graduate school can expect his or 
her studies to include close encoun- 
ters with computers. 

As a rule, there are three levels of 
campus computerization; schools 
that require computer use in the 
curriculum; schools that promote 
use by integrating the computer Into 
supplementary coursework; and 
schools that provide introductory' ex- 
posure but haven't as yet incorporat- 
ed computer use into general studies. 

SCHOOLS THAT REOUIRE 
COMPUTER USE 

Currently, there are only a handful 
of institutions that require students 
to own computers. Most of these are 
technical or specialty schools, such 
as Clarkson University and the Geor- 
gia Institute of Technology. 

Drew University is the only leading 
liberal arts institution that provides 
students with computers. All incom- 
ing freshmen find Epson QX- 16 



ANN LAKORCE IS a freelance writer living 
in New York. 





(Tap) Teaching wifh Ihe Macinlesh ol 
Dartmouth College; (boHom) students 
aulomalitaliy receive a computer and software 
at Drew University, 

computers and Valdocs integrated 
software awaiting them in their 
dorm rooms. They are expected to 
acquire basic, nontechnical comput- 
ing skills, such as word processing, 
as part of their fundamental liberal 
arts education. Often, the students 
are given sophisticated assignments 
on computer disks, which professors 
can use to track their progress. 

SCHOOLS THAT ENCOURAGE 
COMPUTER USE 

Although applications to Drew in- 
creased by 49 percent following the 
computer requirement policy, few 
other liberal arts institutions are 
ready to follow its lead. The main 
reason is that there still isn't one 
computer that can meet the needs of 



all students. The best computer for a 
business major, for Instance, may be 
the worst for someone studying art 
or dance. 

Another consideration is money: 
Most colleges are not eager to tack 
on an extra $2,000 or more to al- 
ready astronomical tuition fees. 

To offset the high cost of comput- 
ers for students, some 20 percent of 
the nation's more than 3,000 col- 
leges and universities are working 
with Apple, IBM, and other manu- 
facturers to provide substantial dis- 
counts on equipment. A leader in 
this is Dartmouth College, which in 
1984 inaugurated a program to pro- 
vide every incoming freshman with 
the chance to buy a Macintosh at 40 
percent off the list price. The cost of 
the computer is built into financial 
aid grants for needy students. 

According to Dr. Agnar Pytte, 
Dartmouth's provost, more than 80 
percent of the class of 1988 bought 
computers last year. 

As soon as they settle Into their 
dorm rooms, Dartmouth students 
are able to communicate with one 
another and their professors via a 
campus-wide computer network. 
They can use the computer to re- 
ceive homework assignments, mail, 
and grades electronically, and even 
research library holdings. 

Faculty members who want to In- 
tegrate the Macintosh into course 
currlculums are provided with com- 
puters and, in some cases, the aid of 
students who understand program- 
ming and can turn a professor's 
ideas into software. The result of 
these ventures is "courseware" like 
SocStaf and AppleTones. 

In SocStat. students work with 
data sets from actual surveys and 
complete elementary statistical anal- 
yses. The results of each analysis ap- 
pear in a window, along with specifi- 
cations for that analysis. Windows 
can be printed and handed in as 
homework. AppleTones. a music- 
building program, enables students 
to develop musical pieces by select- 
ing bars from a palette of single 
notes, chords, glissandi, etc. For 
each bar, the timbre, volume, and 
duration may be changed. The re- 



8 FAMELY COMPUTING 



Discovery Software from World Book:' 

The Joy, the Fun, and the Challenge of learning. 



Tlic joy (ages 3 to 5) 

Pockets Goes to the Carnival 

Six games and activ ilies featuring 

a calliope for mal(ing music 
practice in counting 
review of making one-to-one 
correspondences 





Pockets Leads the Parade 

Six games and activities feaiuring 

I • a dancing bear to put in 
motion 

practice in copying patterns 
practice in recognizing 
patterns 



Pockets and Her New Sneakers 

Eigtit games and ac tivilies featuring 

a dress-up session wilti 

Pocl^ets'" 

practice in classifying by 

color 

practice in classifying by 

sfiape 

practice in classifying by size 



Happy Birthday, Pockets! 

Eight games and activilies featuring 

Birthday presents to wrap 

and fewrap 

practice in matching simple 

and complex shapes 

practice in matching 

numerals 

practice in matching capital 

and lower case letters 

Come Play with Pockets 

Six games and activ ities featuring 

building blocks to move and 
stack 



Tlie Fun (ages 6 to 10) 

Mighty Math 

An arithmetic skills r eview program featuring 
practice in adding, 
subtracting, and multiplying 
practice in determining the 
place value of numbers 
practice in building sets 



Plot-a-Point 

An arithmetic practice featuring 

I • use of the number line to 
add. subtract, and multiply 
practice in plotting 
coordinates 




The Challenge (ages 10 and up) 

Run for President 

A social studies prog ram featuring 

review of geography facts 
about the United Stales 
• a review of U.S. state facts 






A-mazing Words 

A spoiling review program featuring 

• mazes and monsters 

• four levels of difficulty 

• a special "Build a Word" 
option 




Settling America 

A survival simulation program feaiuring 

practice in making value 
judgements 

• practice in making decisions 

• helps expand knowledge of 
post-Revolutionary America 



Spell Bound 

A critical thinking skills review program featuring 
"^ vocabulary reinforcement 

through use of verbal 
analogies 
four levels of difficulty 






Word-Player 

A vocabulary reinforcement program featuring 

practice i n the spelling of new 
words 
_ the opportunity to use new 

1^^^ " ..;; words in context 

^^ ^^- • a "Create Your Own Story" 

^fc^ . option 





How Things Work 

A science simulation program featuring 

• animation of simple 
machines 

• use of simple machines to 
solve problems 





"Kike Me North 

A m ap skills review program featuring 

practice in using cardinal and 
intermediate d 1 reotions 
practice in interpreting map 
symbols 




• practice of visual memory 
skills 

• visual tracking 



Pockets Goes on a Picnic 

Six games and activ ities featuring 

■ wild flower seeds lo plant and 
grow 

' practice in putting pieces 
together to make whole 
things 

■ practice in associating by 
category 



Pockets Goes on Vacation 

Six games and activ ities featuring 

a private plane foi piloting in 
all directions 

' identification of the positions 
In. Out, Next to, Over. Under, 
Right, and Left 



•IBM* PC|r 



Discovery Software from World Book is now available at your local 
software dealer or call World Book Discovery, Inc. at 1 -800-292-9090 
(In Ohio, 1-800-423-7755). 

D«cuvCT>- Sofiwsrc fiom Woiiil Bool( i-s a tridcmark of Worid Bcjok, Inf. 

Apple L-Y a rcj^biered traiitmark or Apple CompiHcr. Inc. 

IBM Is a registered tradt-mark of Intemaiionai tJusinos Macliinr-s Corporalinn 

The characrer and name Pcukcls'"' arc copyiighl ® l«M by Prcnilee A.>a<Kiaiej. Inc. BoMoi). MA UJUI8, 



Fa.st Break 

A punctuation skills review program featuring 

explanation of commonly 
used punctuation marks 
practice in using punctuation 
marks in context 
four levels of difficulty 



WhizCalcI 

An arithmetic skills review program featuring 

practice of basic arithmetic 

^.^ operations 

^^rf^ • nine levels of difficulty 

^S^^ • a "Create Your Own 

^■^5^- Problems^' option 






Space Port 

A visual memory skills review program featuring 
• practice in remembering 
sequences 
' nine levels of difficulty 




"IBM PCjr. (AppleJ^ lie, lie in December) 



WhizCalc II 

An arithmetic comprehension program featuring 

practice in solving arithmetic 

word problems 
■ a database of over 100 word 

problems 
' exposure to a junior 

spreadsheet 



Data Hurdles 

A data use skills review program featuring 

~| • ten activities that review 
ordering, rounding, sets, 
totals, fast math, time, money, 
percentages, measuring, 
and comparing 
' on-screen tutorial skill reviews 
• three levels of difficulty 

•IBM PCjr, Apple lie, lie 

^^^ World Book Discovery, Inc. 





570<) Lombard!) Centre, Suite 120 
Seven Hills, OH ■i4131 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 57 



HOME-SCHOOL CONNECTION 



suiting piece may be played on the 
computer, saved, or edited. 

Even for courses that don't yet in- 
clude special software, students are 
using computers to lighten the load 
and improve their work. One ongo- 
ing study shows that Dartmouth 
computer-owners use their ma- 
chines for word processing about 75 
percent of the time. 

A study of the effects of computers 
on student performance in 10 large, 
introductory courses at Dartmouth 
didn't show an advantage for com- 
puter owners over nonowners. But 
professors and students agree that 
the ease of revision afforded by word 
processing helps students perfect 
their work. 

Kristin Haynes, a sophomore En- 
glish major, has used her Macintosh 
for serious school work since her 
first writing assignment. "I think 
that in some cases the computer has 
bettered my grades," she comments. 
"It has been especially helpful in bi- 
ology and chemistrj', where I have 
been able to submit lab reports with 
detailed tables and diagrams. I can 
pass in neat, easy-to-read papers 
that look professional and make a 
good impression on professors. The 
computer also makes it very easy to 
revise papers for better marks." 

Increasing student exposure to 



computers in courses is a goal of 

many schools in this category. At 
the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology, for instance, some 70 curric- 
ulum-development projects are un- 
der way. In one, students are 
learning to improve their conversa- 
tional French by simulating a search 
for an apartment in Paris. The stu- 
dents read French classified ads. 
talk to prospective landlords, and 
lind their way through the city, all 
by computer. 

At the few colleges with inter-cam- 
pus networks, faculty-student com- 
munication has taken on a new 
form. At one institution, a professor 
who was ili was able to assign and 
collect homework by electronic mail, 
and correct the work while bedrid- 
den. 

SCHOOLS THAT PROVIDE 
ACCESS BUT MAKE NO 
DEMANDS 

Less than one third of the nation's 
colleges and universities are in a po- 
sition to require students to buy 
computers or to aggressively develop 
computer programs for courses. The 
rest of the schools arc still in varying 
stages of training professors in com- 
puter literacy, developing a school- 
wide computer philosophy, beefing 
up public terminal clusters, and 



SHOULD YOU BRING 
ACOMPUIERTO 



A question every prospective under- 
graduate and graduate student has 
in mind by now is, 'Do I need my 
own computer for school?" 

In general, the answer to that will 
depend upon which college you 
choose and the amount of money 
you have left in your budget after 
paying tuition. 

The decision, of course, will be 
easy if you go to a school that re- 
quires the purchase of a computer. 
You'll be expected to figure the ma- 
chine's price into your tuition. If you 
receive financial aid. the cost of a 
computer will probably be included 
in the package. 

But if you opt instead for a college 
or university without a computer 
purchase requirement, you still have 
a few options: 

1. You can beg your family to sur- 
render the home computer for your 
use at school. 

2. You can ask the school you 
plan to attend about the availability 
of public terminals. According to the 
New York-based Talmis, a research 
center, most colleges and universi- 



ties with computers are shooting for 
a ratio of one terminal for every 1 7 
students. Unfortunately, as of Janu- 
ary 1985, the average ratio nation- 
wide was only about 1 :36. 

3. You can look for a roommate or 
friend who has a computer and is 
willing to share. That's how Eldcn 
Hodges, a sophomore studying gov- 
ernment and economics at Dart- 
mouth, has survived without a com- 
puter. "I've always been able to use 
the computer centers or borrow ma- 
chines from other students," he 
says. 

4. You can buy a computer. Bill 
Curran. a senior at Clarkson Univer- 
sity, made that decision, and he 
says he has never regretted it. As he 
notes. "[Having a computer] has 
made college life a lot easier to han- 
dle." 

Don't be too eager, though, to buy 
a computer before you get to school. 
If you aren't sure what kind of work 
you'll be doing or what your major 
will be, it may be wiser to wait until 
you can more accurately Judge which 
is the best machine for your needs. 



planning for the day when comput- 
ers will replace typewriters in dorm 
rooms. 

On the majority of these campus- 
es, use of computers Is more often 
than not limited to homework as- 
signments that can be completed on 
commercial software. 

A good example of this level of 
campus computerization is my alma 
mater, Simmons College, a small, 
liberal arts school for women. "Our 
philosophy is that there are certain 
modern information management 
tools that everyone who graduates 
from college should know how to 
use." says Dr. Leonard Soltzberg, a 
chemistry professor and coordinator 
of academic computing. "We have 
just opened a new microcomputer 
lab and classroom." Instructors of- 
fering workshops there on word pro- 
cessing, spreadsheet analysis, and 
computer graphics use large elec- 
tronic blackboards to project video 
images of their own computer 
screens to the entire class. Students 
can use the public terminals on a 
drop-in basis, and can borrow from 
the school's stock of MacWrite, 
Multimate. Jazz, and Lotus 1 -2-3 
software. 

At Drake University, which doesn't 
yet have a firm policy on computer 
purchase or use, journalism stu- 
dents use Zenith computers for 
newswriting labs, while business 
majors take a required introductory 
computer course. Education and law 
majors also get exposure to comput- 
ers through special labs. Dr. Robert 
Lutz, director of computer services, 
says, "I believe the computer should 
be Integrated into the curriculum of 
all individual majors. Anybody in- 
volved in intellectual pursuits has 
use for computer support. The ma- 
chines will have a major impact on 
curriculum and how students work 
in the future." 

As Tony Gambino, research asso- 
ciate for The Urban Institute in 
Washington, D.C. observes. "High 
school graduates arc now looking for 
computer-rich campuses. In fact, 
many students are better at comput- 
ers than their professors and can 
run circles around them." 

There Is a long way to go before 
computers become as affordable and 
popular on campuses as typewriters, 
and schools establish interconnect- 
ing electronic networks. But, with 
the use of computers in the working 
world increasing rapidly, there is lit- 
tle doubt that colleges and universi- 
ties will find the means to move Into 
the computerized future. S 



10 FAMILY COMPUTiNG 



Next to your computer, 





nothing beats 
a Tandy printer* 




r 



I 



IHHBl 





Tandy printers make fine print quality, 
graphics and high performance affordable. 



For your l)est \ulue iiiul selection in 
tc)p-(jiialit>- printei's, shop \onr lociil 
Radio Sliac-k Computer Center. Wp've 
got what you need, vvhatevei- your print- 
ing requirements. 

Versatile Business Printer 

The DMP 430* (2fi-1277, .$.S99) is a 
132-coluniii dot-matrix printer with an 
18-\vire print head that deHvers supe- 
rior correspondence characters. Choose 
from micro, itahc and douhle-hij^li fonts, 
as well as bit-imajie jrraphics. In the 
draft mode, the DMP 430 delivers a fast 
180 characters per second. 

Low-Cost, Triple-Mode 
Personal Printer 

The DMP 130* (26-1280, $349.95) 
lets vou choose from word processing;. 



data processing and dot-addressable 
fjrapliics. I'rinls in four character styles: 
standard or italic ciirsi\'e in drait or cor- 
respondence modes. 

Budget-Priced High Performer 

The DMP 105^ {26-1276, $199.95) is 
ideal for data processing and general- 
purpose use. Features a hit-image 
graphics mode, too. 

Our Lowest-Priced Daisy Wheel 

The DVVP 220^ (26-127S, $599) 
produces cU'aii sharp, "electric- 
t\pewriter-(]uality" characters at over 
200 words per minute (20 cps). Uses in- 
terchangeal)le 100-character print 
wheels for a \'arict\- of styles. 

See the complete selection of printers 
and accessories at Radio Sliack todav. 



Radio /haeH 

The Technology Store™ 

A DIVISION OF TANDY CORPORATION 

Free 1986 Computer 

Catalog! 

Send Me a Copy. 



Mail Tci^ lUiliD Shack 

Dp|iI, N«.A-5Na 

3O0 One- TjihIs' CeiHer 

Fon Worth, Tcvaj 76102 



Name _ 



('nniiiiuu . 

AiUlrt'ss 

CiU 



Sutf _ 
Phuru- . 



]*rices 



aiMilv ^il Hudiij Shuck C;ijni|mlLT CeiUcrs ami v.1 p;ii(ici|Ullnu stoics and dcMli'is,, DMF 430 ifipurt-s siifcial order ul 
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CIRCLE READER SERVICE 46 
siinif Uiciitiuiis. -IBM CiiHiputililf. flBM Ciimpatible 
d Business MiidiiiK'S Corp. 



Where to find and buy The Halley Project 



Hjtionai 

Available il all Child Wcdd 

and ChUdrens Palace Stores 

Federated Gioup 

Sears — MosI laigei' stores 

Waidenbooks-Most locations 

Alibimi 

Software City 

Hunlsv^lle 

The CampuTcf Shoppe 

Htinisville 

Alnki 

Compuler Express 
Fairtianks 

ArUnui 

The Computer Shoppe 

Little Roc>( 

CJllfDmlj 

Access to Software 

San francisco 

Atloftiable Computer Syslems 

Sanla Clara and San Jose 

Alamo Computer Certef 

Cu peril no 

Alamo Electronic Components 

San Jose 

Applied Computer Skills 

Van Nuys 

B Daiion Software Etc 

Concord. San Diego. 

Bakersfield, Torrance, 

Montclair Nnntiridge 

Books A Bytes 

Cypress 

Boots Camera Electronics 

Fresno 

Border Software 

Chulsvista 

Brawn Knows Computer 

Redlands 

Candy Computer 

Elk Grove 

Computer OuKet 

San Diego 

Computer mar I 

Diamond Bar 

Computertme 

Citrus Hts 

Corporate Micro Services 

San Francisco 

Crown Book & Software 

Los Angeles. S^nia Monica. 

Manna oe\ fte/. Studio Ci^. 

Santa Ana. Redondo Beacn. 

HoJfywood Glendale, Culver 

City. Soutti Pasadena. 

Thoysand Oaks, Torrance. 

Hjrfmgilpn Bcacfi, Downey, 

Sherman Oaks, Encmo, £1 

Tofo, Lonq Beacfi, Palos 

Werdes, Mcrlfipndge, 

Pasadena. Westminsler; 

Woodland Hiiis, Ventura. 

Ukewood 

Eggtiead Software 

L?^ndate. Pasadena. Orange. 

Sherman Daks. San Diego 

Family Discount Computer 

Escondido 

Future Vi5i::n 

San Louis DtHspo 

Futurvision 

Napa 

HJ Electronic, inc 

Sunnyvale 

Home Computing Centers 

San Bruno. San leandro 

Learning Tree Compuler 

Sanla Ana 

Softwaire Centre Infl 

Costa Mesa, Santa Ana 

Software Shoppc 

Huntngton Beach 

Software Firs I 

San Rafael and Santa Rosa 

Software Galena 

Orange 

Software House 

Fresno 

Software Service Center 

Tustin 

Software SoliHion 

Chico 

Software Solubons 

£j Cerrtto 

Software Station 

Costa Mesa 

Software Supermiarkel 

Lawndale. Los Angeles. 

Sherman Oaks 

Software World 

Redding 

Software, Etc 

Novalo 

Sysware 

San Oiego 

ColwadD 

Citadel Con^puter 

Colorado Springs 

ColtMrn School Sjpply Co 

Oenwr 

Colorado Compuler Syster^s 

Westrnmslef 



Calondo fconi) 

DMA Conipuler Solutions 

Colorado Spnngs 

Kazoo & Company 

[>envcr 

Software Cenier 

Concord 

Conn tell cut 
CakJor 



Minourl (cont) 
Software to Go_ 



lllinots (cont) 

Con^puiefLjfKl 

Niles 

ComDulerworkJ 

Chicago 

Crcwn Book £ Software 

Orland Park, Niles, Wheilon, u«.h« 

Evanslon, OaMawn. Oak Park. 3™* „ 

Chicago, Skokie. Deertield, ^""iH^y " 



Si Louis an4 Clayton 

Monttnt 

Colborn School Supply Co 

Srilmgs 



West Norwak, Old Saybrook. ^™^ Grove. Highland 

Enheld. Miltorfl. W Hartford. ^^^ Nawrville, HqHnian 

Vernon. Riv^rs^de. Norwalk |states. Arlmgior: Heights. 

BrookfieW. Trumbull. Calumet City 

Mansfield. Nonwch. Hamden, Oisk-N-Tech 

Waterbyry. Manchester Orland Park 

Stamford. Waliingford. Avon, FD Softwaie S CA DS 

Rocky Hill. Ridgefield Roselle 

Torrinplon, Branford Brtslol, Famity Software 
Meddrettwn, FairtieW. Groton.Qignifaie Heiohls 

&™°'''^ Software and Be^nd 

^outninjion SchaumtJurg 

SolSa k"^*"' Software City 

n^ >,.. . f^ Arlington Helgtits 

Danbury Vjdeo & Computer - 



Oanbury 

Oernc Electronics 

Hamden 

Kiddytown 

Norwalk 

Personal Computer Center 

Norwich 

^tzoids 

Seymour 

Soflown. Inc- 

Danbury 

Software Dty 

Stamford. Orange 

Software Kingdom 

E Hartford, t Windsor 

Video Connection 

Bridgeport 

Oalawire 

Software Kingdom 
Dover 

Dlfctrid ot Cofumbia 
Crown Book 5 Software 
(3 locations) 

Flor»di 

Computer Chip 

Sarasota 

Compuler Generabon 

Planiation 

Compulers. Etc 

Lakeland 

Discount Disks 

Shalimar 

Florida Micro Media 

Pompano Beacrt 

Games H Gadgets 

Clearwater. Jacksonville. 

Tallahassee. Orange Park 

Maxicat 

Miami 

Program Store 

Qearwater, Pinellas Park 

Software Cellar 

Fori Lauderdale 

Soltware Shops 

Brandon 

Georoii 

Academic Software 

Ro swell 

Alpha Jnlcrmation Systems 

FjyetlevilJe 

Cardinal Compulers 

Dalton 

Electronics eoutique 

Atlanta ~ Lenox Square. 

Cumberland Mall 

Games N Gadoets 

Allanla - Nortli Lake MalL 

Perimeter Mall 

Software Ailanla 

Atlanta (2 locations) 

Software City 

Adania 

Versatile Video 

Atlanta and Roswell 

Hiwill 

Software Library 
Honolulu 

Idaho 

Software Galeria 
Idaho Fails 
Stokes Brothers. Ir>c 
Base 

illinoJi 

ABC Diskette 

Cfucago 

Asottwaie Store 

Oaklawn 

Appral Compulers 

Arlnglon HetgfilS 

B Dalton Software Etc 

Cfiicago 

CO? Enterprises 

Chicago 

Complete Computing 

Lombard 

Computer Outpost 

Schaumburg 



Software Plus West 
Hanover Park 
Susie Software 
Mount Prospect 

Indiana 

B Oaiton Softwve Etc 

Indianapolis 

Burkat Computer Center 

Sojth Bend 

Computer Cornei 

Mernlkille 

Microcompuier. Inc 

tndianapolis 

KentuckY 

Software Source 

Louisville 

Ttie Computer Shoppe 

LouESviHfi |2 locations) 

Videovis^ons 

Louisi/iNe 

iJiuisFatta 

S Dalton Software Etc 

New Orleans 

PFL Computer Center 

Monroe 

Software Mart 

Metairie 

Maiyland 

Bjned Treasure 

Rpckville 

Cabdor 

Timonium. Baltimore. 

Sevema Park. Elicon City 

Crown Book & Software 

Wheaton. Columbia, Laurel. 

l^nsmglon. Silver Sprmgs, 

Bowi€, Beihesda, GreenbeU. 

Gaithersburg, Annapolis. 

RockvTile 

Electronics Bouti{;ue 

Baltimore 

Games H Gadgets 

Columbia. Baltimore (White ^^ .,„. 

Marsh Mail, Security Square Livinoston 
Mall. Eastern Art) Program Store 

Greetings and Readings - - . 

Tcwson 



Ntw >ftrl[ {cont) 

B Datton Software Etc 

Vonkers and New Yiwk 

Big L Electronics 

W Hempstead. W Babylon. 

Syosset, New Hyde Park, 

Pale hog ue 

Binary Orchard Inc 

Hamburg, WesI Seneca 

Broadway Computers 

New York 

Byte Sfwp 

Merrick 

Caidor 

Lake Ronkon^. East Paichogue. 

Wappingers Falls, Rtverfiead. 

Rocky Poini, Bridgeham^lon. 

V»ls Bate. Glens Falls, Kingston. 

Mddletown, Latham, Mahopac. 

Bedford Hills, Albany. Vorktcwn 

Heights, Peekskill, Pelf^am 

Manor Schenectady Nanuet, 

wr>ite Plains, Vonkers. 

Newburgh. Port Chester, 

Portsmouth Compuler Center Poughkeepsie. W Babylon, 

Portsmouth Lwiflown, Coram. Clifton Park 

Soft Spoi CJA Soltwate 

Manchester Flushing 

K«w Jifuv Compuler Discount of America 

Bambemcrs Huntir>g1on 

Memo Park, Cherry Hili. Computer Software PIjs 

Paramus. Livingston. Wayne Brookiyn 

Caldor Computer Tech 

Ealontown. S PEainfield. Brooklyn 

West OfarQE, Toms River, Computenvare 

Walchung. Paramus. Morns Easi Meadow 



Las Vvgas, 

Computer House 

Sparks 

Com pu ter-Video-Eleclro mc 

Carson City 

Software City 

Las Vegas 

Knr Hintpihlrv 

Caldor 

Bedford 

Micon Computer 

Londenderry 

Keba Computer 

Plaislow 



Plain. Woodbndge, Brick 

Tcwn. N Brunswick. W 

Pater son 

CIA 

S Piamfield 

Circuit Services 

Newlon 

Computer Pros 

Wayne 

Computer Software 

Ocean 

Cr^ Eddie 

Paramus, E Biunswick, 

Union, Tot?w3. Woodbndge 

Oisk-of'iheWonih Club 

Fair Lawn 

Electronics Boutique 

\toOhrhees, ,Rockiway, 

Vtood bridge 

Family Computer Centres 

FairfieW, South Orange 

Games N Gadgets ........ 

Livingston. Burlington, Wayne qiossv Photo 
Gemmi Enterpnses New Vork 



Compute nvorM 

Bjysnore 

Crazy Eddi^e 

Nesconset. Mass. New ^ork. 

Syosset. Elmhurst. BrooMyn, 

Caile Place, Harlsdafe, Bronx. 

Nanuet 

Easi 33rd Typewriter 

New York 

Electronic Man 

New York 

Electronics Bouitque 

Albany 

Executive Photo S Supply 

New Yofh 

Focus Electronic 

Brooklyn |2 locations} 

Four Guys 

New Yorl( 

Games H Gadgets 

Garden City. Hoifinglon, 

Nanuel 



Cedar Knolls 
GortJen Hedge inc 
Ctierry Hill 
Igor Software 
ftaneck 

Kearny Electronics 
Kearny 
Prince Range 



MttBChltUltS 

Atfaniic Compulers 

Waltham 

Barnes & Noble Bookslor? 

Boston 

Caidor 

Chelmsford. Westborough. 

Swansea. Pembroke. 

WestfieU, Auburn Maiden. 

Mofwell Brockton Canlon. 

Sriflhton, Taunion, Salem. 

Chicopee, Stonefiam. 

Springfield. Framingham. 

Nonhamplon, Worcester. 



Eatontown and Wayne 

Softec 

Newton 

Software City 

Redbank, Lfnwood. Ridgefield. liq^js 

Summit. Teaneck. Bergenfield.j^jg.^ y^;^ 

Parsjppany, Linwood 

Software Spectrum 

North Plamliekj 

Software Stahon 

Mornslown and Roc>L2way 

Video Dynamics 

RKJyewood 

Videom a ma/Computers Plus 

Bloomfield 



Great American Soltware 

Flushing 

Home Software 

Albarry 

Inlerconbnenial 

Flushing 

Island Video & Computer 

Coram 

i&R Computer Duilet 

Wew York 

JSS Electronic 

New York 

Leigh's Computers, tnc 

New York 



Lloyd Corner 
New York 



Weymou&i. Saugus. Methuen,)iSe C<'^Puter Center 
Burlington Cedar Knolls 



Computer Concepts 

Hanover 

Computer, Etc 

F^abody 

Eieclronic 9oulique 

HoJyoke 

Softpro 

Burlington 

Software City 

lAtst SpnngfieW 

Software Galeria 

Boston 

The Whii 

Westtraro 

ttkhloin 

Micro-World 
Livonia and UillprO 
Vor-Tech Computer Cenier 
Pontiac 



B, Dalton Software Etc, 
Brooklyn Park. Mannelonka. 



Wayne Software 
Wayne 
Woistens Inc 
East Orange 

New Meiico 

Academy Computer 

Albuquerque 

B. Dallor> Software Etc 

AlbuQuerque 

Col&orn School Supply Co. 

Albuquerque 

N«w^fM 

17 Software Street 

Vailsgate 

45th Electro 

New York 

47lh Si Photo. Inc, 

New Vork (3 locations) 

Advanced Camera 

New York 

Annex Dutlel 

New York 



Roseville, Edir^a. Minneapolis Barnes S Noble Bootetore 
nil . New York (? locations) 

Forsyth Compoleri 
St, Louis 



London Luggage 

New York 

Micro Co 

New Vbrk 

Micro Electronics 

Valley Stream 

Montgomery Grant 

New York 

Park Avenue Video 

New York 

Phoio Sound 

New York 

Programs Plus 

Brentwood 

Ouariz Electronics 

New York 

Quo Vadis 

Ridgewood 

Show & Tell Video 

Baysliore 

Softwaire Centre 

Forest Hills 

SoftA^re City 

Mount KiscD. Syracuse. 

Wappinger Falls, Brooklyn. 

Flusrll^^q, Tonawanda. 

Spring valley 

Software Link 

WTiite Plains 

Software SeHer 

Harrison 

Stalen Island Software 

Staten island 

Sysul-i. Inc 

Brooiflyn 

Thruway Market 

WaMen 



H«w Yurfc (con II 
Wall Street Camera 
New York 
Willoughtry's 
New York 
World Trade 
Baystde 

Horlh ClOillna 
Byte Shop 
Greeosboro 
Games N Gadgets 
RaleiQh 

Dasis Software 
Wil ruing 10 rt 

Norlfi Da kola 

Col&brn School Supply Co 

Grand Forks 

Software House 

Fargo 

Ohio 

Abths Software 

Fairoorn 

B Dalion Soltware Etc 

Columbus 

Big ayies Computers 

Poland 

Compulers Plus ol Ohio 

MansfieW 

Disk Drive 

Toledo 

Electronic Connexion 

Kettering 

Electronic One 

Columbus 

Games N Gadgets 

N Randall 

Magic One Con^puier 

Barberlon 

Microwave Magic 

Fairfield 

North CoasI Programming 

Willoughby and Solon 

Program Store 

Columbus 

Software and More 

Dncmnaii 

Software City 

Columbus 

Swallens 

Cincinnati 

Sylvan Enterprises 

Cincinnati 

Video Computer World 

Oregon 

Video H Q 

Cleveland 

OklahomB 

Computer Sofrware Center 

Oklahoma Ciry 

Home Software 

Tuba and Oklat^oma City 

Videocomp 

Lawion 

Oregon 
Al vomputers 
Klamath Falls 
Egghead Software 
Beaverton 
Link Three, Inc 
Be avert on 
Software Ga terra 
Beaverton 

Penntylvanla 

B. Dalton Software 

Monroeville 

Bamberger's 

Whitehall. King ol Prussia 

Black Sun 

Emmause 

De Re Computers 

Harrisburg 

Electronics Boulioue 

Langhorne, King of Prussia. 

WhiTehaii. Exion 



Floppy Disk 
Mecnant 



:han)csburg 
Games N Gadgets 
Lancaster. WesT Mifflin. 
King of Prussia, Media. 
F>hiradeiphia 

Rhode Itland 

Caldor 

Woonsocket. Warwick. 

Lincoln 

Future Images 

Woonsocket 

Software Connections 

Warwick 

Soulli Canilina 

Horizon Commodore Super 

Store 

Greertville (2 locaLons) 

Software Solutions 

Charleston 

Tennessee 
Games N Gadgets 
Mempfiis 



South Carolina fconl) 

Inacomp 

Brentwood 

Software Store 

Memphis 

The Computer Shoppe 

Nashville. Knoxville. Memphis. 

Chaitanooga, Madison 

B Gallon Soltware Etc 

Houston 

Babbages 

Dallas Houston. Piano. 

MesQuiie, Fort Worih. Irving, 

Hurst 

Casa Compuler 

Lubbock 

Compurite 

Houston (2 locatrdnsji 

Computer City 

San Anionic 

Computer Experience 

San Aritonio 

The Computer Store 

San Angelo 

Data Pro Compuler Cenier 

Wichita Falls 

Edu-Tron 

Fort WDrth 

floppy Wizard 

Houston 

Fnsco Electronics 

San Antonio. Austin 

Home Software 

friendswood 

National Video Ausftn 

Ajslm (4 locations) 

Softwaie t, Thmgs 

Austin 

Software Store 

San Anlonio 

Vtdeoland 

All locations 

Utah 

Software Center 
Salt Lake City 
SoftM^re Hut 
Salt Ljke City 
Stokes Brothers, Inc 
Salt Lake City, West Valiey. 
Oiem, Ogden. Layton 

Virginia 

Compuler Works 

F*elersburg 

Crown Book A Software 

Alexandria. Woodbndge. 

Reslon, Sprmqliefd. Vienna, 

Manassas, Mdean, Falls 

Church. Fairfax 

Family Compuler Cenier 

Fairfax 

Garrws N Gadgets 

Hampion, Virginia Beach 

L5Y EEectromcs 

Woodbndge 

Nexi Generation Computer 

Wilfiamsbufg 

Program Store 

Falls Church 

Software Central 

Norfolk 

Soltware Mart 

SpnngfveFd 

Softwarecenter. Inc. 

Vienna 

Lfniversjfy Booptstore 

Blacksburg 

V^xhJngtan 
Butlers TV and 
Computer Service 
Federal Way 
Egghead Software 
Tukwila, Bellevue 
Nibbles and Bites 
Tacoma 

Wisconsin 

Computer Software Center 

Milwaukee 

Compuler Warehouse 

Mikaukee 

Romeyn Software 

JanesviHe 

Software Source 

Brookfield 

TMW Software 

Wausau 

Wyoming 

CofbOrn's of Wyommg 

Casper 

Ctnada 

Compusoflware 
Vancouver, BC 

>Me Not ai lornti^ nart^tle 
at afl locjtws 



If there Lsnt a dealer listed in your area, don't give up. 
Give us a caU-Phone 1-800-221-9884 In Illinois l-80()-942-7315. 



»W lUOS C A PE 



^ Just tell your friends 
yodre going on avery long trip. 



^ ;v." ■•■'■: -J '•■'■' '*' M ' 

- ■.'"..■.■'t'^'i'stiL'' •"■''■■' '^^'''<''i.^^ ■• 

:-.->t;^>1^l ;f;n--::-^fg-=j--^rV>^;1t-i^ ..'"- - 






good bye and travel the solar system 
in the most exciting space program 
ever envisioned, 

The Hal ley Project: A Mission 
In Our Solar System"" is history's 
first real-time space simulation. 
Its challenge provides out-of- ;j ■ 
this-world stimulation. .ss;^' 

Lightweight space ■ 
jockeys need not apply, this W "^c* 
one's for qualified star pilots. 
A rigorous ten-mission 
training program will test your ,; 
knowledge and skill as you navigat . 



'^'^'Z: 



jy the stars from planet to planet. 

Complete all ten missions and be 
/ invited to face the ultimate 

challenge; the incredible 
secret eleventh mission. 

So ta ke off to a soft wa re 
dealer and join an elite group of 
^■;, space explorers, As for your 
'■■'"hums, tell them you'll wave as 
- J ju fly oven 



ftware that ctiallenges \he±. mind. - "- -- 

^je Halley Project is amiable on: Apple', 
' Atari* and Commodore* 



Mitidscape, Inc. 3444 Dundee Road, Northbrook, Illinois 60062, 1-800-221 -9884 (In Illinois 1 -800-942-7315) 

Copyright €1965. Mindscape. Inc- All Rights Reserved- Apple, Atari, and Commodore are registered trademarks ot Appie Computer. Atart Inc.. and Commodore Business Machines. 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 34 



Where to find and buy ColorMe: 
The Computer Coloring Kit 



Nslional 

Available at all Child World 

mi Cliildren's Palace Stores 

Federaled Group 

K-Mif1 - Most larger slores 

Montgomery Ward - Mosi 

larger stores 

Sears — Most larger stores 

Alabama 

The Computer Stioppe 
Hunlsville 

Arkansas 

The Computer Shoppe 
Little Rock 

CalltDrnIa 

Access to Software 
San Francisco 
Alamo Compuler Center 
Cupertino 

Alamo Electronic 

Components 

San Jose 

Boots Camera Eleclronics 

Fresno 

Candy Computer 

Elk Grove 

Compuierman 

Diamond Bar 

Crown Book & SofWare 

Los Angeles. Santa Monica. 

Marina Del Rey. Studio City. 

Santa Ana. Redondo Beach. 

Hollywood. Glendale, Culver 

City. South Pasadena 

Thousand Oaks, Torrance. 

Huntinglon Beach. Downey. 

Sherman Oaks. Encino. El 

Toro. Long Beach. Palos 

VerdES. Korthbndge. 

Pasadena. Westminster. 

woodland Hills. Venlura. 

LakewDod 

Egghead Software 

Los Angeles. Huntington 

Seach 

Futurvision 

Napa 

H.T. Electronic, fnc. 

Sunnyvale 

Home Computing Centers 

San Bruno. San Leandro 



Learning Tree Computer 
Santa Ana 


Software First 

San Rafael and Santa Rosa 


Software Galeria 
Orange 

Sodvtare House 
Fresno 


Software Solution 
Chico 


Software Station 
Costa Mesa 


Software Supermarket 
Lawndale. Los Angeles. 
Sherman Oaks 


Software World 
Redding 


GDlDiado 

Kazoo 4 Company 
Denver 



Connecticut leant) 

Craity Eddie 

Norwalk 

Personal Computer Center 

Norwich 

Software City 

Stamford. Orange 

Software Kingdom 

E Hartford, E Windsor 

Video Conneclion 

Bridgeport 

Oitirfct of Columbia 

Crown Book & Software 
(3 locahons) 

Florida 

Games 'N Gadgets 

Clearwater. Jaeksonviile. 

Tallahassee. Orange Park 

Maxicat 

Miami 

Program Store 

Clearwater. Pinellas Park 

Georgia 

Electronics Boutique 
Atlanta — Lenon Square. 
Cumberland Mall 
Games N Gadgets 
Atlanta - North Lake Mall. 
Perimeter t^sW 



Hawaii 

Software Library 
Honolulu 

illlllDlS 

A9C Diskette 

Chicago 

Apprat Computers 

Arlington Heights 

Complete Computing 

Lombard 

ComputerLand 

fJiles 

Compuierworld 

Chicago 

Crown Book & Software 

Orland Park. Niles, Wheaton 

Evanslcn. Oakiawn. Oak Park. r",°"° 90 

Chicago. Skokie, Oeerfield, ,,'yj" 

Downers Grove. Highland ^ 

Park. Naperville. Hoffman 

Estates. Arlington Heights. 

Calumet City 

Disk-fJTech 

Orland Park 

FD. Software & C.A.O.S- 

Roselle 



Maryland (cont) 
Computer Kids 
Rockville 

Crown Book & Software 
Wheaton, Columbia, Laurel. 
Kensington. Silver Spnngs. 
Bowie, Bethesda. Greenbelt. 
Gaithersburg, Annapoiis, 
Rockville 

Electronics Boutique 
Baltimore 

Games 'N Gadgets 
Columbia, Baltimore, (White 
Marsh Mall, Security 
Square Mall. Eastern Ave.) 
Software 'N Things 
College Park 

Massachusetts 

Atlantic Computers 

Wallham 

Barnes & Noble Bookstore 

Boston 

Gaidar 

Chelmsford. Worcester. 

Westborough, Swansea. 

Pembroke, Westfield, Auburn, 

Maiden, Norweil. Brockton 

Canton, Bnghton, Taunton, 

Satem. Chicopee, Sloneham, 

Spnngfield, Framingham, 

Northampton. Weymouth, 

Saugus. Methuen. Burlington 

Computer Concepts 

Hanover 

Electronics Boutique 
Holyoke 
Software City 
West Springfield 
The Whiz 
Westboro 

Michigan 
Micro -Wo rid 
Livonia and Milfoid 



MIstourl 

Software To Go 

St. Louis and Clayton 

Nevada 



New Hampshire 

Caldor 

Bedford 

Portsmouth Computer Center 

Portsmouth 



Connectfcul 

Caldor 

West Norwalk. Old Saybrook. 
Enfield, f^iltord. W Hartford. 
Vernon, Riverside. Norwalk. 
Brookfield. Trumbull. 
Mansfield. Norwich. Hamden. 
Waterbury. fklanchester. 
Stamford. Wallmgford. Avon. 
Rocky Hill. Ridgefield. 
Torrington, Branford. Bristol. 
Meddletown. Fairfield. Groton. 
New Britain, Derby. Southinglon 



Software and Beyond 
Schaumburg 
Software City 
Arlington Heights 
Software Plus West 
Hanover Park 
Susie Software 
Mount Prospect 

Indiana 

Burkal Compuler Center 

South Bend 

Microcomputer, Inc, 

Indianapolis 

Kentucitv 

Software Source 

Louisville 

The Compuler Shoppe 

Louisville 12 locations) 

Videovisions 

Louisville 

Maryland 

Buried Treasure 

Rockville 

Caldor 

Timonium, Baltimore, 

Severna Park, Ellicott City 



New Jersey 

Bamberger's 

Menlo Park. Cherry Hill, 

Paramus. Livingston. 

Wayne 

Caldor 

Eatontown. S Plainfield, 

West Orange, Toms River. 

Watchung. Paramus. Morris 

Plain, Woodbndge. Brick 

Town, N, Brunswick. W. 

Palerson 

Crazy Eddie 

Paramus. E. Brunswick. 

Union. Totawa. Woodbndge 

Electronics Boutique 

Voohrhees. Rockaway. 

Woodbndge 

Family Computer Centres 

South Orange 

Games 'N Gadgets 

Livingston. Burlington, 

Wayne 

Wolslen's Inc. 

East Orange 

New Meilco 

Academy Computer 
Albuquerque 



New Ybrk 

45th Electro 

New York 

471h St. Pholo. Inc, 

New York (3 locations] 

Advanced Camera 

New York 

Annex Outlet 

New York 

Barnes & Noble Bookstore 

New York (2 locations) 

Big L Electronics 

w Hempstead, W 

Babylon, Syosset, New 

Hyde Park. Patchogue 

Binary Orchard Inc. 

Hamburg. West Seneca 

Broadway Computers 

New York 

Byte Shop 

Merrick 

Caldor 

Lake Ronkonk. East 

Patchogue. Wappingers Falls. 

Riverhead. Rocky Point. 

Bridgehampton. Vails Gate. 

Glens Falls. Kingston 

Middletown. Latham, 

Mahopac, Bedford Hills, 

Albany Yorktown Heights, 

Peekskili, Pelham Manor, 

Schenectady. Nanuet, White 

Plains, Yonkers, Newburgh, 

Port Chester Poughkeepsie, 

W, Babylon, Levittown, 

Coram, Clifton Park 

Computer Discount of 

America 

Huntington 

Compulerware 

East Meadow 

Computerworld 

Bayshore 

Crazy Eddie 

Nesconset, Mass, New 

York, Syosset, Elmhurst, 

Brooklyn, Carle Place, 

Hartsdale. Bronx, Nanuet 

East 33rd Typewnter 

New York 

Electronic Man 
New York 

Electronics Boutique 

Albany 

focus Electronic 

Brooklyn (2 locations) 

Four Guys 

New York 

Games 'N Gadgets 

Garden City, Huntington 

Station, Nanuet 

Glossy Photo 

New York 

Great American Software 

Flushing 

Intercontinental 
Flushing 

JSR Computer Outlet 
New York 

J&S Eleclronic 
New York 

Lloyd's 
New York 

Lloyd Corner 
New York 
London Luggage 
New York 
Micro Electronics 
Valley Stream 
Montgomery Grant 
New York 

Park Avenue Video 
New York 
Photo Sound 
New York 
Programs Plus 
Brentwood 



New York (con!) 
Quart; Electronics 
Ne'w York 
Qua Vadis 
Ridgewood 
Show & Tell Video 
8ayshore 
Software City 
Brooklyn, Flushing 
Sfalen Island Software 
Stalen Island 
Wall Street Camera 
New York 
Willoughby's 
New York 
World Trade 
Bayside 

North Carolina 
Games 'N Gadgets 
Raleigh 

North Dakota 
Software House 
Fargo 

Ohio 

Big Bytes Computers 
Poland 

Computer Center 
Mentor 

Computer Corner 
Lorain 

Computers Plus of Ohio 

Mansfield 

Disk Drive 

Toledo 

Dunn Computer Center 

Lynhurst 

Electronic Connexion 

Kettering 

Games N Gadgets 

N Randall 

Local Compuler Store 

Chesterland 

Microwave Magic 

Fairfield 

North Coast Programming 

Willoughby and Solon 

Software and More 

Cincinnati 

Swallens 

Cincinnati 

Video H.O. 

Cleveland 

Oklahoma 

Computer Software Cenler 

Oklahoma Ciry- 

Oregon 

Link Three, Inc. 

Beaverton 

Software Galeria 

Beiverton 

Pennsylvania 

Bamberger's 

Whitehall, King of Prussia 

Computer Renaissance 

Mcnioeville 

De Re Computers 

Harrisburg 

Eleclronics Boutique 
Langhorne. King of Prussia. 
Whitehall, Exton 
Games N Gadgets 
Lancaster. West Mifflin, 
King ol Prussia, Media. 
Philadelphia 

Rhode Island 

Caldor 

Woonsockef. Warwick, 

Lincoln 

Future Images 

Woonsockel 



Soulh Carolina 

Hofimn Commodore Super 

Store 

Greenville (2 locations) 

Tennessee 

Games N Gadgets 

Memphis 

Software Store 

Memphis 

The Computer Shoppe 

Nashville, Knoxvile, 

Memphis. Chattanooga, 

Madison 

Texas 

Babbages 

Dallas, Houston, Piano, 
Mesquite, Fort Worth, 
Irving. Hurst 

Compunte 

Houston (2 locations) 

Computer Experience 

San Antonio 

The Computer Store 

San Angelo 

Data Pro Computer Center 

Wichita Falls 

Edu-Tron 

fort Worth 

floppy Wizard 

Houston 

Software & Things 

Austin 

Software Store 

San Antonio 

Videoiand 

All locations 

UUh 

Software Center 
Salt Lake City 

Virginia 

Crown Book & Software 
Alexandria. Woodbndge, 
Reston, Spnngfield, Vienna, 
Manassas. Mclean. Falls 
Church, Fairfax 
Games *N Gadgets 
Hampton, Virginia Beach 
Program Store 
Falls Church 

Waslilnglan 

Nibbles & Biles 
Tacoma 

Wisconsin 

Computer Software Center 

Milwaukee 



]i tliere Lsii't a dealer lisled iii voiir area.tloii't give up. 
Give us a call.Ph< .ne l-8(K)-221-9884. In lUiiiois l-8(K)-942-7315. 



r^^ I N D S C A P E 



A new set 

of crayons for children of 

the computer age. 



ColorMe nurtures 
creativity with child's play. 

A child's imagination 
needs little more than tools 
and encouragement to flour- 
ish. That's why Mindscape 
created ColorMe:The 
Computer Coloring Kit, 

Every child can shine 
with ColorMe, Kids from the 
age of four and up can com- 
pose pictures without pre- 
vious artistic or computer 



paste options using 
predrawn pictures, 

ColorMe gives every 
artist room to grow. 

With ColorMe. 
kids can draw, color, 
and printtheirown creations 
Text can be integrated to 
createoriginal stories. 
The room for creativity 
is limitless, 

ColorMe Pic- 
ture Disks make this 





experience, The program disk 
can be used alone or with 
one or more optional picture 
disksfor hours of freehand draw- 
ing and thousands of cut and 



coloring kit extra special. 
Choose from Rainbow Brite™ 
Shirt Tales!" Hugga Bunch^'-' 
and TINKITONKi:" These 
popular characters are 



predrawn and ready to "cut 
and paste" for added color, 
excitement and fun. 
You can even take the 
ColorMe Supply 
Box with ad- 
hesive-backed 
paper for stickers, 
colored papers, 
buttons, cards, 
envelopes, and 
a binderfor 
original 
coloring 
books. 

ColorMe. The creative 
computer coloring kit 

Open a new world of 
excitement for your child. 
ColorMe does 
more than 
crayons ever 
could. So aski 
your software 
dealerfor a dem- 
onstration, Then 
take home the fun. 

ColorMe is available on: 
Apple"- and Commodore^ 







Mindscape, Inc. 3444 Dundee Road, Northbrook, Illinois 60062 
1-800.221-9884. (In Illinois 1-800-942-7315) 

Copyright!B1985. MincJscape. Inc. All Rights Reserved Apple and Commodore are registewa 
trademarks of Apple Computer Inc. and Commodore Business Machines. Rainbow Bnte. 
irt Tales and Hugga Bunch are trademarks of Hallmark Cards Inc. TINKITONK! is a trademark 
of TINK TONK, INC. Mindscape is a trademark of filindscape. Inc. 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 35 




HOME/MONEY MANAGEMENT 

HOW A COMPUTER CAN ORGANIZE YOUR FINANCES 
Home-Finance Programs Require Work, 
But Promise A Big Payback 



BY NICK SUtLIVAN 



When I was a teenager I had a sum- 
mer Job as chauffeur/handyman for 
a rich, retired lawyer. I drove him 
around and tended his roses. I also 
did errands for his daughter. If she 
gave me S2 to get sundries, and I 
spent Si. 97, 1 had to dutifully re- 
turn the 3 cents. Other times she'd 
call the dry cleaner, get a price, and 
give the exact amount in advance. ! 
found this penny-pinching attitude 
petty for such a wealthy family, and 
said so to my parents. Their re- 
sponse: "How do you think they got 
so rich?" 

If you watch your money carefully, 
you do so at all levels of your budget. 
Pinch 3 pennies one day and you 
might save $3 the next day, and 
S300 the next. Over the course of 
months and years, you're going to 
come out ahead of the laissez-faire 
money managers. 

Such control over the small and 
large details of your household bud- 
get is the promise of home-finance 
software. And. if you work at your fi- 
nancial recordkeeping, that promise 
win be kept. 

Using home-finance software prop- 
erly does require work. But you can 
consider it work you're being paid 



iMi^ra, Uiiuutt 



flOliSo:. S«c. I 



SBVKKrjh Cowrits 
Frei» Any k*>j to ccnctnufi 




(Top) Andrew Tobias' Managing nurMonef. 
Your finoRtiffl picture is cieor. 

(Battom) Sflvle Porter's Your Personal Money 
Manager. Write a check on your computer. 

for. Chances are you'll end up saving 
money or investing money more 
wisely; at the very least, youll proba- 
bly do your taxes more efficiently. 



THE BENEFITS OF FINANCE 
SOFTWARE 

Checkbook/budget programs 
squirrel away your transactions into 
neatly defined cubbyholes. Like data- 
base programs, home-finance pro- 
grams allow you to retrieve and sort 
transactions in different ways. Like 
spreadsheet programs, they allow 
you to calculate and recalculate ac- 
cording to different formulas. Unlike 
either data-base or spreadsheet pro- 
grams, however, home-finance pro- 
grams are set up and nearly ready to 
go. You just have to customize them 
for your own use. 

Checkbook/budget programs also 
perform several tasks you probably 
couldn't do with a pen, checkbook, 
or ledger sheet. They automatically 
perform "double-entry bookkeeping." 
When you print out a S75 check for 
your dentist, for example, the trans- 
action also is accounted for in your 
medical expense categorj\ tax re- 
cords, monthly budget, etc. 

Finance programs will automati- 
cally execute regular transactions 
with one keystroke. Instead of writ- 
ing out checks for home or car pay- 
ments, let the computer do the dirty 



Program/ Prlie 



CHECKBOOK/I 

Manufacturer 



Hardware 



PROGRAMS 

Comments 



Andreu) Tobias' Managing 

Your Money 

$199 



MECA 

(2031 222-1000 



128K Apple !le/llc; 128K IBM 
PC; 256K PCjr: PCjr cartridge 
version from IBM 



A complete program that Is powerful and easy to 
use; Includes tax, Insurance, real estate, and 
stock sections. The best program of its kind. 



Basic Accounting 
S59 



Firefighter Software 
(800) 641-0814 



48K Apple 1 



Hard to set up, but has full-service accounting. 



Dollars and Sense 
$99-$ 180 



Monogram 
(2131 215-0529 



48K Apple II; 128K IBM PC/ 
PCjr; Macintosh 



Not easy to use. but powerful. Allows portfolio 
management and works with Forecast (tax- 
planning) and home-banking services. 



Dow Jones Home Budget 
$139 



Dow Jones & Co.. Inc. 
(6091 452-2000 



128K IBM PC 



Full-service accounting program; however, 
doesn't process recurring transactions 
automatically. 



Home Accountant 
S75-$150 



Haba/Arrays 
(8181 994-1899 



48K Apple II; 48K Atari XE/XL; 
C 64/128; 128K IBM PC/PCjr; 
Macintosh; Expanded version 
for 128K Apple lle/Ilc; Plus 
version for 128K IBM PC/PCjr 



Complete budget program, but setup is tedious; 
some financial counseling. 



Designed to work with J.K. Lasser's Your 
Income Tax Drot!ram. 



J.K. Lasser's Your 
Money Manager 
S80 



Simon & Schuster 
(2121 245-6400 



128K Apple lle/IIc; 
PC/PCjr 



128K IBM 



Income Tax program 



Qulclcen 
S79-S99 



Intuit. Inc. 
(415) 322-0574 



128K Apple lle/Ilc; 192K IBM Primarily a checking program that is set up like 
PC: 256K PCjr a checkbook and Is easy to use. Better for 
tracking spending than setting budgets. 



Sylvia Porter's your Personal 
Financial Planner 
S60-S130 



Timeworks 
1312)948-9200 



128K Apple lle/Ilc; C 64/128; 
128K IBM PC/PCjr 



A complete program with clear documentalion. 
However, annoying beeps hinder program. 
Financial plamning section is good. 



Time Is Money 
S100-S125 



Turning Point Software 
(6171 923-4441 



48K Apple II; 128K IBM PC/PCjr Powerful budget program thai Is verv' easy to set 
np and use. " 



16 FAMILY COMPUTING 








..IN THE INFORMATION AGE 
WITH THE DOW JONES 
NEWSfiETIHEVAL-> MEMBERSHIP KIT. 
SAMPU A CONTWtlOUS STREAM 
OF KNOWLEDGE AT A PRKE 
YOUCANAFTORD. 

Now you and your whole family 
can experience the information 
age without getting in over your 
head. 

For just $29.95, the new Dow 
Jones News/Retrieval Membership 
Kit leads you step-by-step into 
entertaining and informative data 
bases. With five free hours to 
sample and explore, you can find 
a feet, shop at home, get the 



scores, plan a trip, review a 
movie, choose a stock, or check 
world and business news. There's 
a lot more, too. All you need to 
get started is a computer and 
modem: 

The Membership Kit is a big 
value that entities you to: 

• Your password ($75 value) 

• Easy, step-by-step User's 
Guide 

• FIVE FREE HOURS of usage 
to explore the magic of this 
comprehensive service 




"Toss away any preconception that 
Dow Junes News/Retrieval L<i a stuffy, one 
dimensional data base service designed 
only for an elite corps of stock anatyals 
and Wall Street wizards. Far from it — 
Dow Jones News/Retrieval also provides 
entertaining movie reviews, current 
weather and sports reports, convenient 
electronic shopping and inexpensive 
electronic mail. . .Dow Jones News/ 
Retrieval is informative, entertaining 
arid well worth the money. " 
-Brad Baldwin, InfoWortd Magazine 



^ ^ 1 



• A subscription to Dowline™, 
the magazine of Dow Jones 
Information Services 

Get your feet wet in the infor- 
mation age with the Dow Jones 
News/Retrieval Membership Kit. 
At $29.95, youTl enjoy tiie dip 
without getting soaked. Available 
at computer retailers and selected 
bookstores. For the location 
nearest you, call; 

1-800-257-5114 

In New Jersey, Canada 
and Alaska 1-609-452-15U 

"Free lime" offcr limiled to fi\p(.i) hours per housebc^. 
Musi be used wilhm 30 dz^n of nxtipt d passwunl. 
Nfjmiivil servTCL' fee still applies. 



DOW JDNES^ 



1985 L>tiw JoTios md Oimpan). Inc 
.Ml Rigiits RtatTiwi Dew Jones NchTirReEriev^r 
Ls a njgKStivil 5t5^Tce mark tV IV^w. Jones and 
Compam: Inc. 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 13 



HOME/MONEY MANAGEMENT 



THE PROMISED 
PAYBACK 



1. A big>plcfwre plan. If you Talth- 

fully enter all income and expenses, you 
can view your financial "big picture." 
This will allow you to develop a better 
plan for your future spending and sav- 
ing. By developing a monthly budget, you 
might find that you have 350 extra each 
month that is wasting away In a low-in- 
terest checking account. You might then 
decide to make regular S50 payments to 
your high-interest account or tax-free 
mutual fund. 

Do you need a computer lo tell you 
such an obvious thing? Of course not. 
But since we often overlook the obvious, 
the computer will train our eyes where 
we don't necessarily look. 

2. Pinpoint frivolous spending. 
Where docs the money go? A finance pro- 
gram will tell you that you spent 2.2 per- 
cent of your income on lake-out food or 
that you spent 10 percent of your income 
on clothes. No longer will you have only a 
vague notion of what large credit card 
bills represent: a budget program will 
force you to itemize them. 



3. Complefe tax records. If you've 
properly indexed your transaction catego- 
ries, at year's end you'll be able to get 
complete printouts of tax-deductible ex- 
penses. For instance, you could have cat- 
egories for MORTGAGE INTERt;sT. MBniCAl, 

(with various subcategories), car-loan in- 
terest. MOVING, etc. Instead of running 
around looking for crucial receipts and 
stubs and then adding them up, let your 
computer do the calculations. 'Ybu might 
even find more tax-deductible expenses 
than in previous years. 

4. Understand money. Even If 
you don't maintain your records with 
your computer, and only use a budget 
program occasionally, you still might 
learn something about the ebb and flow 
of your money. Budget programs force 
you lo think of everything (even your 
Babe Ruth autographed baseballs) as ei- 
ther INCOME or EXPENSE, ASSET Or LIABILHT. 

And the mere act of entering transac- 
tions will probably make you a more 
careful spender — you will think about ev- 
ery penny twice! 



THE REQUIRED 
WORK 



1. Set goals. To get full value 
from a finance program, you must know 
what you want to accomplish. Do you 
want a year-end record of all tax-deduct- 
ible expenditures? If so. you must mark 
each tax-deductible expense category, 
and where possible describe its type 
(1040. Schedule C, etc.). In addition, it 
helps to know enough about your tax sit- 
uation to know how much is deductible. 

Do you want to see where you're slip- 
ping off-budget? You must figure out a 
category for everything you spend money 
on and assign realistic budgets. If you're 
spending big money buying chocolates, 
but don't want lo recognize that habit by 
entering it In the computer, your budget 
won't be complete — or true. 

3. Record all transactions. You 
must be vigilant about recording all in- 
come and expenses on your computer. 
Whatever your goal, you won't achieve It 
unless all financial information is Includ- 
ed. In practice, this means entering all 
your transactions on the computer and 
then printing oul checks. If you get in 
the habit of paying your monthly phone, 
utilities, and rentymorlgage bills from 
your computer, fine. 

But what happens when you write a 
check for S102.95 at the dry cleaners? 
That won't be recorded in the computer 
because you didn't use it to write your 
check. What happens when you get S200 
from the bank's cash machine? Record 
the transaction the next time you sit 
down. (You should have an expense cate- 
gory named cash.) Will you remember to 
do so? Get in the habit of throwing odd 



receipts and slips into a basket near your 
computer, and recording them when 
you're ready to pay bills. 

3. Time and money. With few excep- 
tions, home-finance programs are big 
and intimidating, at least at first. They're 
not as fluid as single-purpose programs, 
such as word processors or spreadsheets, 
because they do more. Count on spend- 
ing a leisurely weekend to learn and cus- 
tomize the program. In your haste to get 
started, don't rush through the setup 
procedure. 

In addition, since it's unlikely you'll en- 
ter data unless you pay your checks by 
computer, you'll need a printer and spe- 
cial checks on continuous-form computer 
paper. These cost about S40 for 500 
checks and are customized with your 
name and address. (Ordering informa- 
tion is included in every program.) If you 
wish, you can also order open-window 
envelopes for mailing. 

Note: Make sure your checks match 
your transaction. If you're paying out 
from your Bank One account, you don't 
want Bank Two checks in the printer! 

4. Bacli up your data. You must 
constantly make backups of your dala 
disks. Imagine losing 1 1 months of item- 
ized income and expense reports. Since 
finance programs are forever asking you 
to make backups or to format blank data 
disks, you'd think such utilities would be 
included in the programs. By and large. 
they're not. So spend a few minutes to 
back up existing data disks, and have a 
handful of blank formatted floppy disks 
ready when starting new tasks. 



START IN JANUARY 

Since most individuals operate by 
the calendar year, at least for IRS 
purposes. January Is the best time 
to get started with a finance pro- 
gram. If you continue through the 
year to record your income and ex- 
penses by computer, not only will 
you have a good idea of what went 
where, but you'll also have complete 
accounting records. It's OK to start 
later in the year as long as you can 
go back and fill in the blanks. 

What kind of program do you 
need? Find one that allows you to do 
two main activities — set up budgets 
and print out checks. Some finance 
programs, such as Managing Your 
Money, allow you to analyze poten- 
tial real-estate Investments and life 
insurance plans; others, such as 
Quicken, aren't designed for setting 
up full-fledged budgets but are great 
for tracking your spending. 

Some home-finance programs 
work in conjunction with tax-prepa- 
ration programs. Data from J.K. 
Lasser's Your Moneij Manager can 
be used In J.K. Lasser's Tax Prepar- 
er, and data from Dollars and Sense 
can be used in Forecast. Other pro- 
grams work with home-banking ser- 
vices. Some banking services allow 
you to download banking data for 
use with Dollars and Sense (using 
Moneylink. $49.95) as well as with 
popular spreadsheets. 

Chase Manhattan Bank's Spec- 
trum home-banking ser\'icc lets 
you do your budgeting online. You 
can even enter items you buy with 
cash or with checks from another 
bank. If you own a tax program or 
subscribe lo a home-banking ser- 
vice, check to see if there's an asso- 
ciated home-finance program. 

A TYPICAL CHECKBOOK/ 
BUDGET PROGRAM 

All checkbook/budget programs 
operate by the same general princi- 
ples. Here's how a typical program 
works: 

1. Set up accounts. After you 
specify information about your com- 
puter (number of disk drives, print- 
er, etc.), you're asked to list your ac- 
counts: checking, credit cards. IRAs, 
money market, etc. You also provide 
information such as current bal- 
ance. Each time money comes in or 
goes out it will affect one or more of 
these accounts. 

2. Set up budget categories. 
Most programs come with budget 
categories already In place, such as 

TELEPHONE Of DENTIST. YOU Can alSO 

add and subtract categories. Next, 



18 KAMILY COMPUTING 



SYLVIA PORTEirS 
PERSONAL FINANCIAL PLANNER 

DOES MORE THAN 
MANAGE YOUR MONEY 

IT PLANS YOUR FHAIKUL FUTURE TOO 

Sylvia Porter, and the editors of Sylvia Porter's Personal Finance Magazine, now combine with all the computer tools 
you'll ever need to help manage your money on a day-to-day basis and plan your financial future, too. In Sylvia Porter's 

style, without complicated financial jargon or "computerese". 



Volume! 

Your Personal Financial Planner: 

Helps you track your day-to- 
day financial data, then com- 
bines this information with your 
future financial objectives to 
produce ttie most comprehen- 
sive and easily-understood finan 
cial planning program available. 

For Your Day-to-Day 
Affairs: 

• Maintains your electronic check- 
book and credit card system. 

• Wriles your checks and balances 
your checkbook. (We even built in a 
calculator and memo pad for you. 

• Prepares and monitors your budget. 

• Classifies and tracks your taxable 
income and expenses. 

• Calculates your net worth and gener- 
ates customized personal financial 
statements. 

• Tracks your financial assets - and your 
insurance policies. 

• Graphically generates supplemental data, 
such as percentages, ratios and charts. 

• You get our Toil-Free Hotline and our Cus- 
tomer Technical Support Team at no charge. 

• You getTimeworks' Money Back Guarantee. 
(Details in each package.) 




For Your Financial Future: 

» You'll be led step-by-step through a 
series of questions regarding your life 
and lifestyle, your financial goals, and 
your current financial condition. Your 
answers will enable a computer 
to determine and print a summary 
of the amounts you must save each 
year to meet your financial 
objectives - in both real and inflated 
dollars. 
• Helps you plan for protection 
against major medical adversities 
and other financial setbacks. 
Each program interfaces with 
others in this series. Your 
information can be 
incorporated into letters and 
reports produced by 
Timeworks' Word Writer. 
• Everything is integrated. You 
need to enter data only 
once. 

Available for Apple, IBM 
and Commodore computers. 

Moderately Priced - from your 
favorite Dealer or contact 
Timeworks for the Dealer closest to you. 




Next in this integrated series: 

Your Personal Investment Manager. 

Other Timeworks Programs: The Evelyn Wood 
Dynamic Reader ' W:rd Writer with Spell 
Checker Data Manager 2 ■ SwiftCalc with 
Sideways ■ Business Systems • Swiflax 
Cave of the Word Wizard ■ Wali Street 



More power for your dollar. 

TIMEWORKS, INC., 444 Lake Cook Rd., Deerfield, IL 60015, 312-948-9200 

® 19W Sylwa Porter's Personal Financo Magazine Co, S Time*ori(s. inc. All rigliis reserved 
CIRCLE READER SERVICE 54 




22 EAST-PACED, 

\ GO FOR THE GOLD! 



■^1 



■-^ 





SUMMER GAMES.® 

Want some great play action? This 
award winning best seller brings you 
eightgreat events, including Swimming, 
Diving, TVack, Gymnastics, and more 
Compete against world records. Or get 
together with a group of up to eight for 
some good competitive (mx. Realistic, 
graphics and action will challenge you 
again and again to go for the gold. 

SUMMER GAMES ll." 

You asked us for more great events. 
Here they are. Rowing, TViple Jump, 
Javelin, High Jump, Fencing, Cycling, 
Kayaking, even Equestrian. Like 
SUMMER GAMES, you get spine tingl- 
ing action and challenge for one to 
eight players. These aren't just games. 
They're the games. And you're the star. 

WINTER GAMES." 

You've got to see the graphics, and feel 
the knot in your stomach as your bob- 
sled careens along the walls of the run 



to know why people are wild over 
WINTER GAMES. Seven events give 
you a variety of action— from the 
endurance of the Biathlon to the 
timing of the Ski Jump, and more. 

What ate you waiting for? 

Play your favorite events over and 
over. Play all 22. Set up teams. Chal- 
lenge your friends. These great action- 
strategy games are sure to be the stars 
of i/o«r collection. 
At your local Epyx ciealer. 

APPU WJA MUa t64/U8 

Summer Games 11 y^ t^ 

\VmtcrGam£s *^ .^ ^ 



SUMMJEa. 



' SUMMERGAMESD 





' See ?pti.i.iil!- mafkd hovi^ l.Dr dctai^- 
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COmVTB>SOFTWAIt£ 



1043 Kiel CL, Sunnyvale, CA 94089 

^rategy Games for the Action-Game flayer' 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 15 



HOME/MONEY 

you're asked to describe whether it's 

INCOME, EXPENSE, ASSET, Or LIABILITY'. 

For instance, your PAYCHECK would 
be a budget category and would be 
classed as income. 

3. Assign budgets. Most pro- 
grams allow you to design monthly 
budgets for checking or charge ac- 
counts and income and expense cat- 
egories. 

If the expenses in any category re- 
main constant, you don't have to en- 
ter the budget each month. The 
computer will do that. If you expect 
a steady increase or decrease, the 
computer can also add or subtract a 
monthly percentage. 

This automatic calculation saves 
time and also allows you to play fore- 
casting games. What if you spent 5 
percent less on groceries each 
month — what would that do for your 
overall budget? 

4. Record transactions. Each 
lime you add or spend money you 
have made a transaction that affects 
your accounts. To keep your ac- 
counts balanced, you should record 
each transaction. Printing out 
checks is about the only practical 
way to use finance programs, as it 
forces you to record transactions. 
You list the payee, the account the 
money is coming from and the bud- 
get category (or categories) it's as- 
signed to. Then you push a button 
and print out a check. For recurring 
transactions, such as rent, the com- 
puter can pick up last month's infor- 
mation for you. 

5. Grapbs and reports. During 
the year, as your transactions accu- 
mulate, you build up a massive data 
base of personal financial informa- 
tion. You can play with the data in a 
number of ways. Many programs will 
create bar graphs or pie charts de- 
picting horrific trend lines, such as 
your expenses vs. your budget. De- 
pending on your printer's capability, 
you may be able to print out these 
charts. At the very least, you will be 
able to create text reports that can 
be printed out. 

COOP FOR YOU? 

Are checkbook/budget programs 
worth your time and money? If 
you're hopelessly disorganized, prob- 
ably not. Such programs don't prom- 
ise to reform you. If you're responsi- 
ble but careless, finance programs 
might be the goad you need. If 
you're organized already, a finance 
program probably won't help, but 
you'll enjoy putting it through its 
paces. When they're working well, fi- 
nance programs are fun to use. Til 




CIRCLE READER SERVICE 23 



JANUARY 19S6 21 



ANNOUNCING THE 
FAMILY SOFTWARE SPECTACULAR: 



BUY 3, GET 1 FREE. 



CHOOSE FROM 
OVER 50 LEADING TITLES. 

What do you call an offer that brings together, for the 
first time ever, five leading brands of home softvrare? 

The Family Software Spectacular! 

And it's your opportunity to choose zfree software pro- 
gram from the best titles on the market today. All you have to 
do is buy any combination of three tides from any participat- 
ing brands during this special offer period . And we'll send 
you another one of your choice -free! 

It's a one-of-a-kind value your family shouldn't miss. 

FISHER-PRICEf 
A NAME YOU CAN TRUST. 



They're great for kids, yet fun for all ages. 

Enjoy "THE WIZARD OF OZ." " You are Dorothy, 
and each of your decisions determines your adventure. 
There's more than one adventure to be had as you meet old 
friends and new in the land of Oz, 

WORIC BETTER WITH 
BETTER WORKING." 



For years Fisher-Price has been known for helping chil- 
dren develop skills as they play. With Fisher-Price '" Learning 
Software, your child can develop skills in five key areas: math, 
language, creativity, basic learning and computer literacy 

Your child will love developing and testing language 
skills with the help of PETER RABBIT READING, a pro- 
gram that uses voice to teach sound and letter recognition 
in words. 



WIND JIAM classics: CLASSIC 
NOVELS COME TO LIFE. 

Pick up Windham Classics, graphic interac- 
tive fiction based on some of the greatest adventures 
of all time. 



Constantiy erasing and retyping? Unsure of your spell- 
ing? WORD PROCESSOR WITH SPELLCHECKERis 
exactiy what you need. This full featured word processor 
includes the 50,000 word AMERICAN HERITAGE 
DICTIONARY '" speUchecker which detects over 99% of 
misspelled words. 

The full line also includes 
FILE& REPORTand 
SPREADSHEET-tities 
that represent the best 
values on tiie market 
today 




SPINNAKER? THE LEADER IN 
FAMILY LEARNING SOFTWARE. 

From pre-school counting to high-school compositions, 
Spinnaker offers the high quality educational programs 
you have come to expect . For example, there's the HOME- 
WORK HELPER '" series which provides step-by-step 
methods for improving writing and math skills and helps 
kids tackle otherwise troublesome school assignments. 

TELARIUM." 
INTERACTIVE FICTION AT ITS BEST 

Here's graphic interactive fiction by famous writers of 
science fiction, fantasy, and mystery like Ray Bradbury, Arthur 




C. Clarke and Erie Stanley Gardner. Each story unfolds with 
you in the center of the action - and completely in control. In 
PERRY AiASON: THE CASE OF THE MANDARIN 
MURDERr you are the worid famous criminal law7er. Chal- 
lenge the evidence. Cross-examine the wimess. Only you 
can prove your client's innocence. And time is running out. 

A SOFTWARE OFFER FOR ALL AGES. 

Any software offer including something for everyone in 
the family is certainly fantastic. But combine that with a free 
product offer and what you have is something spectacular. 
Look for the specially marked boxes of The Family Software 
Spectacular at your retailer. 





TURN PAGE FOR MORE INFORMATION ON T 
SOFTWARE SPECTACULAR. — 

■S 1985 SSC. , One Kendall S<)Uare,Canifiridge , MA 02 1 39. All rights rtscn-eJ. Tiliesavailablcon niosi popular hiime compHIm. Spelling Sofi- 
a^fedcitlopcd by Ho uRhm n Mifflin Company, puhliiheri of the.-immfjnJ/i-nMg.-DirtMnim', 

THE FAMILY SOFTW.y^E SPECT.ACULAR is a iradcmark of Spinnaker Software Corp. SPiNNAKERis ai*gia&ed uademarkof 
Spinnaker Software Corp. FISHER-PRICE is a iradonark of The Quaker Oils Companvmd is used under license. WINDHAM CLASSICS is 
atrademark of Windham Classics Corp. TELARIU.M is a trademark of TeUriura Corp. BETTER WORKING isa trademark of Spinnaker 
Sofmare&irp, (-|^cLE READER SERVICE 49 



HERE'S HOW WiJ CAN 
TAKE ADVANTAGE OF 

She Swnily ^^iwiwe^peetmcidar^ 



REMEMBER, TO RECEIVE A FREE 
PRODUCT YOU MUST PURCHASE ANY 
THREE TITLES FROM THE PARTICIPAT- 
ING BRANDS (IN ANY COMBINATION) 
AND MAIL YOUR ENTRY NO LATER 
THAN JANUARY 31, 1987. 

1 . S tan by saving the reccipt(s) from your soft- 
ware program purchases. (I t is noi necessary 
for software purchases to appear on one 
receipt. Photocopies of the receipi(s)are 
accepted. Receipts must be dated BETWEEN 
JULY 1,1985, AND JANUARY 31, 1987.) 

2. Cut the proof-of-purchase tab from each of the 
three user manuals that come with the pro- 
grams . (Photocopies not accepted . ) 

3. Attach the purchase receipi(s) and the three 
original proof-of-purchase tabs to one separate 
sheet of pa per. 

4. Fill in the form below and place the completed 
form in an envelope with : 

a. A sheet of paper with three original proof- 
of-purchase tabs and your purchase 
receipt(s). 

b. A check or money order for S3. 50 to cover 
postage and handling. (Canada residents 
please send $5 .00 for postage and 
handling.) 

Make check payable to THE FAMILY SOFT- 
WARE SPECTACULAR and maH envelope to: 
THE FAMILY SOFTWARE 
SPECTACULAR 

P.O.Box 1327,Cambridge,MA 02238 

rORDERFORM T 

I To receive your free prograin, this fonn must be filled 
out compleleiy. Please print. 

I Free Product Chosen: 

I Titie'Braiid 



¥)u'll find all participating brands at these stores. 



Computer/Model. 



MAKE SURE THE PRODUCT VOU CHOOSE IS AVAU-MU; 
ON THE COMPUTER SYSTEM VOU H.WE SELECTED. 

Name 



Phone ( )_ 

Address 

Gts 



- Stiste. 



-Zip_ 



TITLES PURCHASED 



1 

2 

3 

BRANDS 



DA11E0FPURCHASE 

I 

2 

i 



Allow 6-8 weeks fordeliwryof yourfree software program. 
Note: A!] receipts and envelope postmark must be dated 
priorto January 31, 1987. Offer good in the US and Canada 
I onlyVoidwheretaxed.restrictEdorpfohibitedbylaw. | 



ALABAMA 

Burns Software 
Sheffield, AL 
Hytek Computers 
Florence, AL 

ARIZONA 

Collegian Computer 
Book and Software 
Stores, Inc. 

Phoenix, AZ 

Software Oily 
Tucson, AZ 

ARKANSAS 

Arkansoft 
Harrison, AR 
Computers and You 
El Dorado, AR 

CALIFORNIA 

Softwaire Centre 
Brea.CA 
R.W.ChrisI 
Campbell. CA 
The Software Solution 
Chico.CA 
Border Software 
Chula Vista, CA 
Softwaire Centre 
Concord, CA 

Dublin Computer 

Systems 
Dublin, CA 
Candy Computer 
£lkGrove,CA 
Computer Center of 

Hayward 
Hay ward, CA 

Software Centre 
La Mesa, C A 

The Loading Zone 
National City, CA 
Software Etc. 
Novate, CA 

Software Galeri a 
Orange, C A 

Software Central 
Pasadena, CA 

Golden West Systems 
Porterville.CA 

Software World 
Redding, CA 
Brown Knows 

Computing 
Redlands.CA 
Software Seryice 

Center 
Riverside, CA 
Computerland 
San Bernardino, CA 

Software City 
San Diego, CA 
Access to Software 
San Francisco, CA 
Computers and 

Beyond 
San Francisco, C A 



Software Galena o1 

San Francisco 
San Francisco, CA 
Affordable Computer 

Systems 
San Jose, CA 
Software Galena 
SanlaRosa,CA 
Tfie Computer Room 
Thousand Oaks, CA 
Softwaire Centre 
Torrance, CA 

COLORADO 

Computerland of North 

Denver 
Arvada.CO 
Computer City 
Broomfteld,CO 
Ciladel Computers 
Colorado, Springs, CO 
DMA Computer 

Solutions 
Colorado Springs, CO 
Renaissance 

Computerware 
Colorado Springs, CO 
Micro Computer World 
Greeley. CO 

Computerland of 

Columbine 
Littleton. CO 
Software Center 
Littleton. CO 
CONNECTICUT 
Oanbury Videos 

Computer Ctr 
Danbury.CT 

Softown. Inc. 
Danbury.CT 
Software Kingdom 
E. Hartford, CT 
Bright Ideas Computer 

Center 
Guilford, CT 
Software Kingdom 
East Windsor, CT 
Omni Computer 
New Canaan, CT 

The Personal 

Computer Center 
Norwich, CT 
Software City 
West Hartford, CT 
Small Computer 

Service Center 
Westport,CT 

DISTRICT OF 
COLUMBIA 

The Program Store 
Federal Center Plaza 
Washington, DC 



FLORIDA 

Inacomp Computer 

Ctr, 
AltarnonleSpnng, FL 
Softsvare Shops 
Brandon, FL 

The Program Store 
Clearwater, FL 

Sunshine Discount 

Software 
Fort Lauderdale, FL 
Computers Etc. 
Lakeland, FL 
H.I.S. 

Computermation 
Melbourne, FL 
Maxical Computers 
Miami, FL 

Nibbils Software 

Centers 
North Miami Beach, FL 
Computer Center 
Panama City, FL 
The Program Store 
Pinellas, FL 

Fiorida Micro Media 
Pompano Beach, FL 
Modern Computing 
Rockledge,FL 
Software City 
Saint Petersburg, FL 
Computer Chip Inc. 
Sarasota. FL 
Discount Discs 
Shalimar, FL 

Education Computers 

Etc. 
Tallahassee. FL 
Discount Software 
West Palm-Beach, FL 
GEORGIA 
Software House 
Jonesboro.GA 
Software City 
Savannah, GA 

HAWAII 

Microcomputer 

Systems 
Honolulu, HI 
Software Library Inc. 
Honolulu, HI 
Software Plus 
Honolulu, HI 

Microcomputer 

Systems 
Kailua.HI 

IDAHO 

Software City 
Idaho Falls, ID 

ILLINOIS 

Software City 
Arlington Heights, !L 
Software City 
Carol Stream, IL 

Computers Plus 
Chicago, I L 



Aardvark Computer 
Software Specialists 

Chicago Heights, IL 

Microcomputer 
Center 

Crystal Lake, I L 

Computer Tree 

DeKalb,IL 

Computer Corner 

Edwardsville,IL 

Software First 

Evanston,iL 

Software Or Systems 

Fairview Heights, IL 

Computer Corner 

Fairview Heights, IL 

Lake Shore 
Computers 

Lake Forest, I L 

Save on Software 
Lombard, IL 
Centram Distributors 
Mokena.lL 
Compuler Software 

Connection 
Moline.lL 

mini Microcomputer 
Naperville.FL 

Software Centre 
Niles,IL 

Oak Brook Computer 

Center 
Oak Brook, IL 
Micro Age Computer 
OrlandPark,IL 

Computer Visions 
Roselle.lL 

Software and Beyond 
Schaumburg,IL 
The Software Center 
Urbana.lL 
Software Plus 
Wheeling, IL 
Software Galeria 
Westchester, I L 

INDIANA 

Microcomputer 

Systems 
Columbus, IN 
Computerland ol 

Evansville 
Evansville, IN 
Tfie Game Preserve 
Indianapolis, IN 
Burkat Computer 

Center 
South Bend, IN 

IOWA 

Rick's Computers 
Danbury, lA 

KANSAS 

Team Electronics 
Garden City, KS 
Softwaire Centre 

International 
Leawood,KS 



Software City 
Overland Park, KS 

KENTUCKY 

Software FirsI Inc. 
Florence. KY 
Software City 
Louisville, KY 
Perrys Computer 
Utica,KY 

LOUISIANA 

The Software Place 
Metarie, LA 
Softwaire Centre 
Metairie, LA 
Software f^art, Inc. 
Metairie, LA 

MAINE 

Pierre's of Excfiange 

St. 
Portland, fv^E 

MARYLAND 

f^iller and fwliNer 
Cumberland, MD 
Computer Learning 

Systems 
Frostburg.MD 
Ttie Program Store 
White Flint fviall 
Kensington, MD 
Computer Kids 
Rockvi(le,MD 
Software City 
Rockville.MD 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Online Computer 

Systems 
Andover, MA 
Software Galeria 
Boston, MA 
Software Plus 
Concord, fulA 

General Computer 

Store 
Hamilton Plaza West 
Framingham.MA 
Computer Systems 

and Software 
Leominster, fvl A 
Personal Computer 

Resources 
Norwell,fi/1A 
Computers Etc. 
PeabodyMA 
Land of Electronics 
Saugus.MA 
Computer 

Marketplace 
Tewksbury,MA 
Ttie Bit Bucket 

Computer Store 
West Newton, MA 
The Whiz Computer 
Stores, Inc. 
Westboro.MA 
Software City 
W. Springfield, MA 

MICHIGAN 

Computer Center 
Birmingham, Ml 
Computer Center 
Farmington Hills, Ml 
Computer Center 
Garden City, Ml 
Advanced 

Management 

Systems 
Grand Rapids, Ml 

Software City 
Grand Rapids, Ml 

Software Carousel 
Grand Rapids, Ml 

Computers Today 
Holland, Ml 



Software Library 
l<eego Harbor, IVll 
Advanced 

Management 

Systems 
Muskegon, Ml 
Bits, Bytes, Nibbles 
PeloskeyMI 
Strom Computer 
Plymouth, hill 
Micro Station 
Soulhfield.MI 
Software City 
Southfield,MI 
Rainbow Computers 
Troy, Ml 

Orion Computer 
Walled Lake, Ml 
Command Computer 

Systems 
Warren, Ml 
Rite Way Computers 
Warren, Ml 
Software Library 
Westland,MI 

MINNESOTA 

Computer Consulting 

Center 
Fairmont, MN 

Rolandsons 

Computer Center 
Fergus Falls, MN 

Computer Exercise 

World 
Minneapolis, MN 

MISSOURI 

Alternate Computer 

Supply 
1-800-221-3789 
Software City 
Independence, MO 
Database Systems 
Springfield. MO 
Software City 
St, Louis, MO 
Software to Go 
St. Louis, MO 

NEBRASKA 

C.B.M. Computer 
Omaha, NE 
Software City 
Omaha, NE 
Computer 

Connections 
Scotts Bluffs. NE 
NEVADA 
Computer Base 
Carson City, NV 
Software City 
Las Vegas, NV 
Computer Menu 
Reno,NV 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Computer Mart of 
New Hampshire 
Amherst. NH 

Computer Mart of 
New Hampshire 
Manchester, NH 

Computer Mario! 
t^lew Hampshire 
Nashua, NH 
Computer Town 
Nastiua,NH 
Computer Town 
Salem, NH 

NEW JERSEY 

Software City 
Bergenfield, NJ 



Village Computer 

Center 
Cedar Knolls. NJ 
Software City 
Cross County Plaza 
Cherry Hill, NJ 
Wolsten Inc. 
East Orange, NJ 
The Program Store 
Eatontown, NJ 
American Way Outlet 

Mall 
Fairfield. NJ 

Family Computer 

Center 
Fairfield. N J 

Software City 
Fair Lawn, NJ 

Software City 
Hamilton, NJ 
Livingston Computers, 

Inc. 
Livingston, NJ 
Software City 
Montvale,NJ 
Software Station 
Mornstown.NJ 
Computer Ark 
Nonhfie!d,NJ 
Computerland 

Norlhlield 
Nonhfield,NJ 
Software City 
Pine Brook. I\IJ 

Software City 
Red Bank. NJ 
Software City 
Ridgefield.NJ 
Computer Ark 
Rio Grande, NJ 
Software Station 
Rockaway, NJ 
Computerland 
Somerville,NJ 
Family Computer 

Center 
South Orange, NJ 
Computer Emporium 
Sparta, NJ 
Software City 
Summit, NJ 
Software City 
Teaneck,NJ 
The Program Store 
Wayne, NJ 

NEW MEXICO 

Page One Software 
Albuquerque, NM 

NEW YORK 

Home Software 
Albany. NY 

Riester's Computer 

Store 
Auburn. NY 

Sysut Computers 
Brooklyn, NY 

Binary Orchard 
Buffalo, NY 
Computer Systems 
Depew,NY 
Microimages 

Industries 
Flushing, NY 
Softwaire Centre 
Forest Hills, NY 
Ray Supply Inc. 
Glens Falls, NY 
Software Seller 
Harrison, NY 
Camel Computer 

Systems 
Lindenhurst, NY 



C.C.C.Computer 

Center 
t>JewRochelle,NY 

Computer Center 
NewRochelle.NY 
Software Solutions 
New York, NY 
Adirondack Computer 

Supply 
Plattsburgh,NY 
Ray Supply Inc. 
Plattsburgh,NY 
Sound Software 
Salt Point, NY 
Computer Innovations 
Smithtown.NY 
Software City 
Staten Island, NY 
Computer Solutions 
Syracuse, NY 
Computer Factory 

Outlet 
Tonawanda, NY 

Software City 
Tonawanda, NY 

Computer Factory 

Outlet 
Southgate Plaza 
West Seneca, NY 

NORTH CAROLINA 

Computer Alternatives 

Systems 
A5hville,NC 
Software City 
Fayetteville,NC 
The Computer Store 
Laurinburg.NC 
Computer Displays 
Rocky Mount, NC 

OHIO 

Wyse Book and Office 

Supplies 
Archbold,OH 
Personal Computer 

Co. 
Boardman.OH 
Software Galena 
Cleveland.OH 
Diskcount Software 
Columbus. OH 
FAS-Trak 
Columbus. OH 

The Program Store 
829 Bethel Rd. 
Columbus, OH 
The Program Store 
4432 Cross Roads 

East 
Columbus, OH 
Friend Chips 
Cuyahoga Falls, OH 
Software City 
Dayton, OH 
Software Shuttle 
Dayton. OH 
Chuck's Computers 
Massillon,OH 
Softwaire Centre Int. 
N.Olmsted, OH 
The Disk Dnve 
Toledo, OH 
Software City 
Youngstown,OH 

A.D.S. Systems 
Zanesvilte, OH 

OKLAHOMA 

Video Comp 
Lawton.OK 
Computer Software 

Center 
Oklahoma City, OK 
Software City 
Tulsa, OK 



OREGON 

Software Station 
Beaverton,OR 
Cherry Computers 
The Dalles, OR 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Software City 
Bethel Park, PA 
Country Computing 
Blueridge Summit, PA 
Software City 
Exton, PA 

De Re Computers 
Harrisburg,PA 

EastcoasI Software 
Hershey, PA 
Software Unlimited 
Levittown, PA 

Edu-Care 

Microcomputer 
Mechanicsburg, PA 
Software Hut 
Philadelphia, PA 
Computer Bug 
Pittsburgh. PA 
Pittsburgh Computer 

Store 
Pittsburgh, PA 
Pittsburgh Computer 

Store 
Pleasant Hills, PA 

Hi-Tech Computer 
Springfield, PA 
Software- N-Stuff 
Warrington, PA 

The Computer Source 
W. Reading, PA 
Software Galena 
Wayne, PA 

TENNESSEE 

Stewart Software Co. 
Memphis, TN 
ECS Computer 
Murfreesboro.TN 

TEXAS 

Computer Stop 
Abilene, TX 
Book Stop Inc. 
Austin, TX 
Impulse Computer 
Bay City TX 
Discount Computer 

Supply 
Corpus Christi,TX 
Book Stop Inc. 
Dallas. TX 
ComputerAge 
Dallas, TX 
EKB Software 
El Paso, TX 
Book Stop Inc. 
Houston, TX 
ComputerAge 
Houston, TX 
Computer Country 
Loehmans Plaza 
Houston, TX 
CompuRite 
Houston, TX 
Computeriand 

Lubbock 
Lubbock, TX 
C.R. Software 
Mesquite.TX 
Software Supply 
MissouriCity.TX 



Computer Tutor 
Piano, TX 
Book Stop Inc. 
San Antonio, TX 
Software Store 
San Antonio, TX 
San Antonio Discount 

Computer Supply 
San Antonio, TX 
Action Business 

Systems 
Temple, TX 

Software Place 
Webster, TX 
Software Ink 
Wichita Falls, TX 

UTAH 

Lloyd'sComputers 
Orem, UT 
Home Computer 

Goods 
Sandy, UT 

VERMONT 

Ormsby's Computer 

Store 
Barre,VT 
Ray Supply Inc. 
South Buriinglon.VT 

VIRGINIA 

Family Computer 

Center 
Fairfax. VA 

Firstep Computers 
Richmond. VA 
Software City 
8026 AW Broad SL 
Richmond, VA 
Software City 
9944 Mindlothian 
Richmond, VA 
Software Plus. Inc. 
Richmond, VA 

Jack Hartman 8. Co. 
Roanoke, VA 
Diskovery 
Seven Corners, VA 
Software City 
Virginia Beach, VA 
Computeriand 
Winchester, VA 

WASHINGTON 

Software City 
Bellevue,WA 
Apple Valley Computer 
East Wenatchee, WA 
University Bookstore 
Seattle, WA 

WISCONSIN 

Software Source 
Brookfield,WI 
Team Electronics 
La Crosse, Wl 

Fox Valley Personal 

Computers 
Oshkosh,WI 
Team Electronics 
La Crosse, Wl 
C.B.M. Computer 

Center 
Madison, Wl 
WYOMING 
Wind River Sporting 

Goods 
Pinedale.WY 



GAMES 

OUR CRITIC PRESENTS THE 20 GREATEST GAMES OF 1985 



BY JAMES DELSON 

The past 12 months have been a 
time of growth for computer gaming. 
Even with fewer companies, more 
quality games arrived this year than 
ever. As arcade programs declined in 
number, the strategy/arcade field 
look off. leaping to the forefront of 
gaming. 

Big news in 1985 included new 
forms of role-playing adventures, the 
introduction of animation in text/ 
graphic adventures, and an increase 
in the scope and numbers of strate- 
gy and tactics games. 

Computer gaming is an exciting 
and developing field that surprises 
me eveiy month. After playing close 
to 200 new games in 1985, 1 careful- 
ly chose this selection as the best of 
the year. 

Note: For the first time, there's 
been a lie for Game of the Year. Un- 
less stated otherwise, all games are 
for ages 12 and up. Minimum mem- 
ory requirements are 48K for Apple 
II series, 48K for Atari Home Com- 
puter, 128K for IBM PC/PCjY, and 
128K for Macintosh. 



GAME OF THE YEAR No. 1 





Galactic Adventures 

Strategic Simulations; 
(415) 964-1353 

The most involving and enjoyable 
role-playing adventure to date, it 
surpasses even the Wizardry and Ul- 
tima series. A solo player or team 
guides one to 10 developing charac- 
ters through a galaxy of hair-raising 
adventures and combat, matching 
wits and weapons against the per- 
sonalities found in the course of 
play. Design your own modest en- 
counters or full-fledged adventures 
with the game's construction set. 
Galactic Adventures is complex, 
takes months to play, and offers the 
best times gamers can have on a 
computer. (For Apple II, Atari; S60.) 

JAMES DELSON. FAMii,Y COMPUTING 's games 
crilic, has been playing games since 
shortly after he was born — and 
computer games since shortly after 
micros were bom. 



GAME OF THE YEAR No. 2 





STRATEGY AND TACTICS 

^ 



,i=^ 



^l^ 



Colonial Conquest 

Strategic Simulations: 
(415) 964-1353 

This one- to six-player political/ 
economic/military simulation has 
the Great Powers, circa 1880, strug- 
gling to control the world. Easy to 
learn but hard to master, the game 
system offers novices and experts 
alike a serious challenge from the 
most sophisticated set of artificial 
opponents we've encountered. I'll be 
comparing new games with this one 
for some time to come. (For Atari, 
C64: S40,) 



CONTINUING SERIES 

r 





Ultima IV 

Origin Systems, distributed by 
Electronic Arts; 
(415)571-7171 

A hybrid of traditional role-playing 
and text/graphic adventures com- 
prises this long-awaited sequel. It 
combines character growth and 
combat with the required interactive 
conversations of an intellectual pro- 
gram. Improved graphics, a novel 
approach to spell-casting, and all the 
usual tomfoolery expected from Lord 
British make this a welcome treat. 
(For Apple II: $40.) 



ROLE-PLAYING ADVENTURE/ /> 
Phantasie ^ ^ 




JZE 



=c 



strategic Simulations; 
(415) 964-1353 

Quest into unknown territory, dis- 
covering sections of a huge, scrolling 
map as you travel. One to six players 
age 10 or older fight monsters, de- 
velop characters for dangerous so- 
journs into dungeons, teleport from 
town to town, and learn spells. Com- 
bines the best elements of previous 
role-playing adventures with the 
most fully fleshed-out characters yet. 
(For Apple II: C 64/128; S40.) 



;E=5-!ffi i ii-Kli 




The Battle of Chiclcamauga 

Game Designer's Workshop; 
(309) 452-3632 

Here's a one- to two-player simula- 
tion of the American Civil War bat- 
tle. The program allows you to deter- 
mine both how many of your forces 
the computer can "see" and the com- 
puter's "thinking" time In solo 
games. The game also tracks each 
unit's fatigue, morale, hidden move- 
ment, and command-control status. 
This is a breakthrough in the genre 
at a time when its development and 
popularity are accelerating. (For 
Atari; S35.) 




TACTICAL SIMULATION 
Field of Fire 

Strategic Simulations; 
(415)964-1353 

Tactical simulation is a new game 
category beginning to appear. Unlike 
strategic simulations (such as 
Chickamauga. listed above), which 
cover entire battles and all the par- 
ticipating units, these games are 
small-unit encounters where the ob- 
ject may be to take a house, not a 
town; a bridge, not a province. 

In Field of Fire, a single player or 
team takes a "World War 11 company 
of U.S. troops from North Africa to 
the Battle of the Bulge in eight var- 
ied scenarios or a full campaign. The 
program offers features common to 
both war games and role-playing ad- 
ventures, (For Atari. C 64: S40.) 



POLITICAL 





X 



^=C 



Incunabula 

Avalon Hill: 
1301) 254-5300 

Set on a mythic pre-Christian con- 
tinent, here's a complex game of 
statecraft mixed with economic, fi- 
nancial, and historical conflicts. One 
to seven human or computer players 
combine foreign trade, alliance-forg- 



26 FAMILY COMPUTING 



(No I.D. required for half-elves.) 



When the Going Gets Tough, 
the Bard Goes Drinking* 



Hnd the going is tough 
. in Skara Brae town. 
The evil wizard Mangar 
has cast an eternal winter 
spell. Monsters control 
the streets and dun- 
geons beneath. Good 
citizens fear for their 
lives. What's worse, 
there's only one tavern 
left that serves wine. 
But the Bard knows 
no fear \Vith his trusty 
harp and a few rowdy 
minstrel songs he claims 




are magic, the Bard is ready 
to boogie. All he needs is 
a band of loyal followers: 
a light-fingered rogue to 
find secret doors, a 
couple of fighters 
to bash heads, a con- 
jurer to create weird 
allies, a magician for 
magic armor 
Then it's off to com- 
bat, as soon as the Bard 
finishes one more verse. 
Now what's a word that 
rhymes with "dead ogre?" 




4 classes of magic user, including 

wizard and sorcerer. 85 new 

magic spells in all. 







You ire start l^d 
i by a $rt» snarl. 
I 3(?fore yotit you 
I $«■«■ I Red dra.E|Dn^ 

aUill your 

I 5U Ju»f t band 

1 ct.Dos*^ to (Tjight 



nRIBII THE FIST 



I1ERI.IH 



128 color monsters, many 
animated. All challenging. 




Full-color scroiling dungeons. 

16 levels, each better than the 

one before. 3-D city, too. 



The Bard's Tale 

from 







ELECTRONIC ARTS" 

Specs: 100% machine language, 400K worth on 2 disks- 64K RAM minimum; enhanced for I28K, Now available for Apple II family for $41-95. C-M Si 128 for $59.95- 
To order: Visii ynur rclarlcr or c.lll (800( 227-6703 (In Calif, call (800) 652-7979) for VISA or MasterCard orders- To purchase by mail, send check or money order to Electronic 
Arts, P.O- Box 506, Half Moon Bay, CA 94109. Add $5 for insured shippinp and handling. Allow 1-4 weeks for delivery. The Bard's Talc is worth [he wait 

Apple is a trademark of Apple Computer Wizardry is a registered trademark of Sir-Tech Software, Inc. Ultima is a registered trademark of Richartl Garrtntt The Bard's Tale and 
Electronic Arts are trademarks of Electronic Arts. For a copy of our complete catalogue and direct order form, send S.50 and a stamped, self-addressed envelope to Electronic 
Arts, 2755 Campus Drive, San Mateo CA 94403. 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE M 



GAMES 

ing. and military operations, all 
within the game's nomadic lifestyle. 
The result is a fascinating, ancient 
version of Diplomacy with Monopoly 
overtones. (For IBM PC/PCjr; S30.) 




MULTIPLAYER 
Paris In Danger 

(301)254-5300 ' l |_ 

Paris in Danger, the best multi- 
player game of 1985. is one of those 
rare games designed from the start 
for two or more players. That saves 
the computer's power for details of 
group gaming. Reenact Napoleons 
1814 campaign to save France from 
the invading Prussian-Austrian-Rus- 
sian alliance. Players switch from 
strategic movement on a master 
map of France to tactical combat on 
hundreds of smaller maps enlarged 
from the master. The play system is 
superb. Suitable for use by up to a 
dozen gamers. (For Atari; S35.) 



The attribute points of characters 
increase after combat. (For Apple II; 
$35.) 



ARCADE/SHOOT-'EM-UP 





STRATEGY/ARCADE 



SHU! ' 




Kennedy Approach . . . 

MicroProse Software: 
(301) 667-1151 

If you think flying one plane Is 
tough, try taking charge of an air- 
port control tower. This cdge-of-the- 
seat air traffic controller simulation 
is one of the most intense games 
around. In a nonstop battle of wits 
and hand/eye skills, solitaire players 
or teams control a sk>' full of air- 
planes that can talk with you. Oper- 
ating on several skill levels at six 
U.S. airports, you must maintain a 
constant balance in routing flights, 
directing planes to land and take off, 
and keeping the aircraft from collid- 
ing with, or even approaching each 
other. (For Atari. C 64; $35.) 




ARCADE/ROLE-PLAYING 
ADVENTURE 
Competition Karate 

Motivated Software: 
(415) 383-9005 

The first program to combine the 
character-creation and long-range 
development elements of games such 
as Wizardry with the streamlined 
play systems of strategy/arcade pro- 
grams like Archon. The fast-moving 
system allows you to create charac- 
ters and match them against human- 
or computer-controlled opponents. 



Countdown To Siiutdown 

Actiuision: 
(415) 960-0410 

Solo players or teams control eight 
robots — each having different spe- 
cialties — to avoid a meltdown in a 
huge nuclear plant. You have the ro- 
bots work as a team, using their in- 
dividual strengths while protecting 
their weaknesses. Scout out a vast, 
multileveled labyrinth, map a route 
through it, and eliminate your oppo- 
nents. Finally, shut off the reactor at 
the labyrinth's core. With slick 
graphics, this game is fast moving, 
amusing, and compelling. For age 10 
and older. (For Apple II. C 64; $30- 
S40.) 




ARCADE 
Karaieica 

Broderbund: [ , " i ^^ 

(415)479-1170 * -4]_ 

A martial arts hero tries to rescue 
a princess. Entering the domain of a 
mysterious bad guy, he has one-on- 
one karate encounters with comput- 
er opponents, each tougher than the 
last. It's for age 10 and older and is 
beautifully animated, (For Apple II. 
Atari, C 64; S30-$35,) 

HYBRID 





The Ancient Art of War 

Broderbund; 
(415)479-1170 

This intelligent and challenging 
hybrid program combines war-game 
strategy, arcade skills, and a con- 
struction-set structure with great 
animated graphics. You fight com- 
puter opponents such as Caesar, 
Genghis Khan, and Alexander the 
Great. Solo or team players can use 
the games provided or create their 
own scenarios. The Ancient Art of 
War includes animated characters 
who move like real people (a first for 
this genre). A good introductory 
game with appeal for experts. (For 
IBM PC/PCjr, Macintosh: S45.) 



SIMULATOR 





let 

subLOClC: 
(217) 359-8482 

Here's a superb jet fighter program 
that allows you to lake off, land, par- 
ticipate in dogfights and aerobatics, 
go on high-risk bombing runs, and 
fly precision maneuvers. You can use 
long-range radar, computer-con- 
trolled target tracking, 360-degree 
vision while flying, variable magnifi- 
cation to see distant targets, and an 
ejection seat for quick escapes. It's 
all in real-time with 3-D graphics. 
(For IBM PC/PCjr; $50.) 



TEXT/GRAPHIC ADVENTURE 





Wilderness 

Electric Transit, distributed by 
Electronic Arts: 
(415)571-7171 

You are an aircrash victim lost in 
the wilderness. To survive, you must 
hike out of your predicament, living 
off your provisions and the land. 
This stunning, thrilling, and innova- 
tive program includes excellent doc- 
umentation with lots of information 
on hiking and other outdoor skills. 
(For Apple II: 849.) 




^ 



TEXT-ONLY ADVENTURE 
The Hitchhiker's Guide 
to the Galaxy 

Injocom: r~7 

(617)492-1031 '^^ 

As the Earth's only survivor, your 
travels are difficult but rewarding. 
You wander the galaxy in search of 
truth and some explanation of the 
meaning of existence (or whatever 
passes for it amidst the stars). Often 
frustrating to the point of distrac- 
tion, this is the funniest game of the 
year; for age 14 and up. (For Apple 
I!, Atari, C 64. IBM PC/PCjr, Macin- 
tosh, Tandy Model III: $35-S40.) 



CONSTRUCTION SET 
Mail Order IMonsters 

Electronic Arts; 
(415) 571-7171 

Monsters is the first construction 
set in which you create characters 




28 FAMILY COMPUTtNG 



Another Qeat Smuktion from SW Me/er - 
Autiior ofF-15 Strike Eagle 

Now he takes you from the cold, thin air and limitless space ofF-15 Strike Eagle down into 
the dark depths of the Pacific Ocean inside an American World War It submarine for a 
realistic, action-filled simulation — 



r^^^. 



RIIFMT 



Thrill to the initial sighting of the 
enemy's strike force in your peri- 
scope as their ships come into your •'^ 
range. But watch out — the enemy's 
escorts have just sighted you. You're 
the hunter — but suddenly ~ you've 
become the huntedl 

As Commander, you must sink their 
ships and keep your submarine (roi 
being destroyed — if you can. Will yoi 
select a quiet patrol sector in the 
Marianas Islands or choose the 
dangerous waters off the coast of 
Japan? Is a submerged daylight 
periscope attack best or do you 
charge n on the surface at night 
using only radar bearings to guide 
you? Do you fire a spread of your pre- 
cious torpedoes or can you close the 
range and pick off the enemy v\rtth a 
single torpedo shot? These decisions 
and many more are yours to make as 
you take your place among the elite 
ranks of tlie SILEIXT SERVICEI 

It's exciting — and it's fiin. Its 

another great Micro Prose simulation 
— and it's called SILENT SERVICE. 
Look for it now on your 
dealer's shelves. 



v^*.V 






Try These Other 
Real Ufe Simulations 



Decimon 




FIVE AUTHBiTIC 
BATTLE STATIOn SCREETiS 



Silent Service is avaJiaWe for Commodore 64/128. 

Apple II Family, Atari XLyXE, IBM PC/PC Jr. 
computers for a suggested retail of only 
$34,95. Avaifabte socn tor Macintosh for a 
suggested retail of only S39.95. Call or 
wTJte for more information or MC<^ISA Orders. 



nOuuOtKiME- APPLE. ATAR*. IBM.«^ UACiNTOSh. 
are regoHsa ndoTiwta cil Corranodore Blsmvss Inc. 




Ehfing Attack Helicopter 
Actcn in ttffi AH^ Apaciv! 



Exciting Speech ond 
Graphic AirTroffic 
Control Action! 



Ytju a/e m commartd - 
Nonft Africa 1940-1943 



AmSiPKlSE 






,arins 



SIMULATION 



SOFTWARE 



Pholo Gouilssy Baltlmora Maritime Museum 



120 LAKEFRONT DRIVE • HUNT VALLEV, MD 21030 • (301) 667-1151 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 32 



GAMES 



that grow and develop. This excit- 
ing, build-it-yourself program also 
doubles as an impressive strategy/ar- 
cade game. Pick creatures (such as a 
human being, bear, amoeba, or Ty- 
rannosaurus rex), then equip them 
with a wide variety of weapons and 
devices to improve their fighting and 
survival skills. Send your monsters 
into combat or competition against 
human or computer opponents. You 
can play this game a hundred times, 
and it'll never be the same twice. For 
age 10 and up. (For C 64; S32.) 



FINANCIAL 
BottomLine Capitalist 

Venture Software: 
(818) 986-4110 

BottomLine Capitalist is a sophis- 
ticated program for up to four play- 
ers or teams. Take a small electron- 




ics firm and turn it into a national 
corporation. Control unit prices, 
manufacturing costs, advertising, 
marketing strategies, and more. A 
thrilling experience aided by useful 
charts and tables. The documenta- 
tion is the only hitch, since it's hard 
to follow without financial gaming 
experience. (For IBM PC/XT; S80.) 




FOR YOUNGSTERS / /■ 

B.C. II: Grog's Revenge^ ^ 

Sierra On-Llne; 
(209) 683-6858 

This sprightly game features the 
daring exploits of ace Stone Age in- 
ventor Thor. Rolling along atop his 
wheel, Thor steers through moun- 
tain trails and stalactite-dotted cav- 
erns, picking up clams while avoid- 
ing natural dangers and Grog the 
dinosaur. The animated scrolling 




graphics are superb, and the play 
system is easy to master for kids old- 
er than 6, (For C 64; S35,) 



SPORTS 

On-Field Football 

Gamestar: 
(805) 963-3487 

Employing joysticks and the key- 
board, one to two players control 
fully animated four-man teams. This 
is the most complex sports simula- 
tion to date; yet once you learn it, 
it's the easiest to play. Choose from 
a variety of plays. You can pass, 
hand off. fake a kick, punt, lateral in 
the backfleld, or run the ball your- 
self. You can also intercept and run 
back the other team's passes, kick 
off, return a kickoff, recover fum- 
bles, and more. Enjoyable for age 
10 and up. (For C 64; $31.) 'k 




♦St. 



J»'.'' 



MAKIT 
with 

MOVIT 



Only the choice is difficult . . . Sound Sensor Controlled models 
which include Peppy, Piper Mouse, Medusa. NEW S-CARGO 
and Turnbacker . . . In(ra-Red Sensor Controlled kits like the 
Avoider or Line Tracer. ..Circular, A Radio Frequency Controlled 
kit ... M r. Bootsman, ourHandContro!ledkit...256X4bitRAM 
programmable Memocon Crawler Available with Interface kit 
(optional) lor Commodore, or Apple II, + , e, NEW WAO program- 
mable with "turtle type" graphics, interlace kit {optional) for 
Apple, IBM, Commodore, and NEW NAVIUS — Programmable 
Disc "Recommended DURACELL baMeriea. 

See your local Electronic/Computer Dealer. MOVIT kits range 
from $24.95 to 399.95 Suggested list price. 



> * 



OWI 



■jSr' a 



OWilna 1160 Mahalo Place 
Compton, CA 90220 (213) 638-4732 




30 FAMILY COMPUTING 



Number one arcade hits 















\ 






h 










mm^m 



You are the KUNG FU MASTER, 
Sartie the evil forces through the 
five dangerous floors in the 
wizard's castle to rescue the cap- 
tive fair maiden 



470 Needles Ave. 
San Jose. CA 95 11 2 
(408) 72^4490 



Put on your black belt and chal- 
lenge your friends or the com- 
puter through nine picturesque 
settings in this leading Martial 
Arts Gfinie to become the 
KARATE CHAMP. 






Sef^>es Look iot iliefn ai youi- »oc<sI comfRjiei/so/tware or g'3rh^"'Ko"r^^ttict3yr 

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"jrW (rf COfnfTOdC/^ Eteciro/lif? LTD srvT 




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PRICE 
BUSTERS 




apple *• alarf •■ commodore ** ibm-pc " pc-jf 

games • educalion " home management 

business ' ulilHies ' systems 

on 

disks cartridges cassettes 

Our prices are 25% to 50»/« or more below retail. 

We tiave ttiousands ol different compuler items. 

And. YES. they are the Real Thing. ..NOT COPIES. 

Please call or write for our current price list. 

Be sure lo lell us what computer you have. 

CODE for Ihls PRICE LIST 

APS-Appieil. li + .IIC.liE ATDaAiariDisk 

CH = C/64lllSi< IBM. IBM-PC and IBM-PCir 

e = Educaminai h = Home Use r=BecreaIiona( 

APZ AID C64 IBM Hama dI Program or lien 



$33 e 

S29 r 

US S4S S33 S50 h 
S23 S23 S23 SJ3 
S35 S35 S35 S33 





UContlgrit 


ui Slilas 


Alama/Hiwiil 


Sottarara 






FPO/AFO/Oiuda 


SMpping 


U.P.S. 


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Fuarto nico 


Coil For: 


Grouod 


2-0>y Air 


(Air) 


1 llEin 


3 50 


550 


7 50 


2 Items 


bSO 


BDO 


10 00 


3 Items 


7 50 


10 50 


12 50 


4 Items 


9 50 


13,00 


15 00 


i lleras 


11 50 


15.50 


17.50 


6 Hems 


13 5D 


1600 


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7 or More 


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20 DO 


22 00 



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Bank Street Writer 
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Flight Simulator II 



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Wa Carry ALL ol EleElronlc Arts Products such «: 

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528 $18 $18 $28 h Music Construction Set 

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CIRCLE READER SERVICE 17 



COMPUTING CLINIC 

ATARI 130XE RAM DISK* APPLE lie EXPANSION 
•PRINTING FROM BASIC 



When I use the Lusr function 
with my Radio Shack Color Com- 
puter 2, my CeP-l 15 Color 
Graphics Printer prints the lines 
on top of each other. How I can 
prevent this? 
kenne;th summey 
Cartersville. Georgia 

This is a common problem. The BA- 
SICS on some computers give line 
feeds to printers (advance the print 
head to the next line); others do not. 
Atari, Commodore, and Radio Shack 
BASICS don't. The CoCo llist func- 
tion sends a carriage return (returns 
the print head to the beginning of 
the line), but not a line-feed instruc- 
tion. Consequently, the DIP switches 
on your printer should be set to pro- 
vide an automatic line feed after 
each carriage return. This will stop 
the overprinting of lines. — j.b. 

Does Apple have any plans to 
make a peripheral for the lie 
that will allow the use of plug- 
in circuit boards, such as those 
used on the lie? 

F3.D. WOOD 

Surfside. South Carolina 

Not so far as we know: but such a 
device is often not necessary. The 
lie's printer, modem, and Joystick/ 
mouse ports all offer expansion pos- 
sibilities. Other products, such as 
system clocks and speech and music 
synthesizers (which often come in 
the form of circuit boards for the 
He), are available as external devices 
for the lie. 

In addition, some third-party man- 
ufacturers have introduced products 
that you can install inside your lie 
to give it more power. And no solder- 
ing is needed: the companies say all 
you need is a screwdriver. 

The MultlRam CX Card from 
Checkmate Technology, Inc. (509 
South Rockford Drive, Tempe, AZ 
85281: [6021 966-5802) expands the 
He's 128K RAM to either 384K 
($229) or 640K (S429)! And you can 
install the company's optional 
65C816 kit (which will give the lie a 
16-bit processor) right on the card. 



Questions are answered by jeftrey 
iiAiRSTOW. a regular Clinic comributor, 
and LOUIS WALLACE, who has written 
several product reuieiiis and Buyer's 
Guides. 



If you're more interested in run- 
ning software such as WordStar or 
dBase on your lie, consider Z-RAM 
from Applied Engineering (P.O. Box 
798, Carroll ton, TX 75006: |214| 
241-6060). Both the 256K (S359) 
and the 512K (S419) models include 
the Z-80 processor necessary to run 
CP/M programs. Applied Engineer- 
ing's Z-80c card ($159) adds CP/M 
capability but no extra memory. 

Both companies' memory-expan- 
sion products will work with the 
best-selling AppieWorfcs program, 
expanding its desktop dramatically 
(to 413K with Z-RAM!), Also, since 
AppleWorks is loaded entirely into 
memory at one time, thus bypassing 
the need for disk access, it runs 
much faster with these. Dan Pole, 
president of Applied Engineering, 
expects his company and others to 
come up with many more hardware 
and software enhancements for the 
Apple lie and Macintosh (also a 
"closed" system). — l.w. 



How do I use the full laSK in 
my Atari 130XE7 And can DOS 
3.0 turn the extra 64K into a 
IRAM disk? 

M. IHCINTYRE 

Harriman. Tennessee 

If you wish to use the extra 64K in 
your BASIC or machine-language 
programs, you should consult the 
130XE owner's manual. It gives in- 
formation on accessing the extra 
memory (in banks of 16K). You can 
use this memory space to store data 
(such as sprites, pictures, etc.) that 
can be called into a program when it 
runs. 

According to John Skruch, man- 
ager of XE software, your DOS 3,0 
will not turn the extra 64K into a 
RAM disk. (A RAM disk is part of the 
computer's memory that acts like a 
super disk drive — you can load flies 
into RAM and access them faster 
than from the disk drive.) However. 
DOS 2,5. which now comes with the 
1050 disk drive (in place of DOS 
3.0). automatically turns the extra 
64K into a RAM d'isk. You'll be able 
to use it with unprotected programs, 
such as Atari Writer. To obtain DOS 
2.5. send your DOS 3.0 disk to Atari 
Corp. (1 196 Borregas Ave., Sunny- 
vale, CA 94088, Attn: Customer Re- 
lations, DOS 2.5). —L.w. 



32 FAMILY coiwpirriNG 



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Only NRI teaches you to service and 
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micro 



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as an NRI graduate, you'll possess the up- 
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You learn at your own convenience, in 
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Critics hail the new Sanyo as 
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As you build the Sanyo from the 
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Using utility programs, you'll check out 8088 
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NRI is the only home 
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Your NRI Course Includes 
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Worth $1500 at Retail— and More. 



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If the card is missing write to NRI at the 
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. , . then install 
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11 




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see your nearest computer dealer. To 
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FAMILY 
COMPUTING 



Setting Up Your 
Software Library 



BY DAVID HALLERMAN 



OUR CRITICS OFFER YOU THEIR SUGGESTIONS 
FOR BUILDING COMPUTER SATISFAaiON 

Tutorg 



I 





ould you rather be singing "Getting to Know You" or "(I 
Can't Get No) Satisfaction" while using your new comput- 
er? Organizing your personal software library could make 
the difference. In order to make the machine do what you want (for 
computers do nothing without software), you need smart tools to 
control it. So naturally you ask, "What should I buy? Which are the 
'must have* software packages?" 

When asked which titles they'd choose for setting up a family 
software library, FAMILY COMPUTING'S panel of experienced reviewers 
spoke with almost one voice: "It depends." 

Before talking about specific titles, most of the panelists pointed 
out that researching your needs comes first. Concentrate on learning 
your computer's capabilities and on finding out what's available, 
they said. Your best bet is reading books and magazines. 

Only then, the group felt, could their software suggestions be 
useful. "Every time 1 recommend [a software package], I must be 
aware of biases" and "what ought to be on your shelf may not be 
what's on mine " were commonly expressed. 



JANUARY 19B6 35 




II 



With those caveats in mind, let's look at the results of 
FAMILY computing's informal software library survey. 

CATEGORIES FOR YOUR COLLECTION 

Of all the different types of software on the market, one 
category in particular won approval across the board. In 
fact, it was everyone's first choice. We're talking about 
word processors. These programs have essentially re- 
placed typewriters as the writing tools of choice. Even if 
you write only once in a while, the ability to correct 
mistakes on-screen before printing makes them invalu- 
able. And if writing is a regular part of your life, then 
switching to a word processor will be, as one reviewer 
phrased it, "the next best thing to paradise!" 

While not as universally needed as word processing, 
number-crunchers and data managers will make a major 
difference for people who handle substantial amounts of 
information. Spreadsheets and personal finance pack- 
ages offer two methods for manipulating your bills and 
budgets. As general number-tracking toois, spreadsheets 
work equally well at managing home accounting or the 
statistics of your favorite baseball team. Personal finance 
software is, as the name indicates, dedicated to that 
specific purpose. If your information consists of words as 
well as numbers — a name and address file is a classic 
example — data-base (or filing) programs help you arrange 
and call up data as needed. These much-touted produc- 
tivity tools can help organize your life. But you'll probably 
need to update your information regularly. Ask yourself if 
your work style is conducive to that requirement. Re- 
member that fitting a computer into your life often works 
best when it's used as an extension of interests you're 
already involved in. Don't trj' to twist yourself out of 
shape to adjust to the machine; it's your servant. 

A good introduction to computers will ease the transi- 
tion. Nothing saves you more time than familiarity with 
the keyboard, so if you're not comfortable at the keys, try 
a program that teaches typing. Or for a stimulating taste 
of your machine's possibilities, pick up the latest volume 
of a magazine-like disk containing a variety of programs. 
DAVID HALLERMAN is reuiews editor Jor family computing. 



" WJV^I 1 III t 



=liJ^"l 






Certain games can help you get acquainted, too, by dem- 
onstrating the computer's intricate. Interactive nature. 

The computer's capabilities in graphics and sound of- 
ten yield eager visions of expanded artistic productivity. 
Many families surveyed found that software (and in this 
case, hardware add-ons) can enhance your visions. Such 
tools foster creativity in drawing, music, and animation 
by letting your ideas flow smoothly and by encouraging 
experimentation. They're a lot of fun, too. But if drawing 
a stick figure is hard now, or if you don't know a "C" note 
from a notepad, the software won't make you into a 
talent. Graphics programs for creating pages filled with 
pictures and fancy typefaces are also fun. They're often 
productive and easier for the artistically handicapped. 

Do you need to program? Well, no, not nowadays. Not 
most folks. You can live a long, productive life on a diet of 
canned software alone. But even though programming is 
no longer as essential as it once was. it's still popular in many 
households. In fact, parents and children can meet as 
true equals when playing with computer languages. Also, 
you'll be more self-sufficient after you learn how to grow 
your own programs. "Little" ones written at home can 
customize the computer to your way of working. Even a 
passing familiarity with programming deepens your 
sense of computer logic. That touch alone will often help 
you master some subsequent program. Of course, Logo, 
Pascal, and BASIC maintain their vitality in schools as 
well. Maybe not as much as some commercials would 
have you believe, but they're an important factor for 
many students, nonetheless. 

WORD PROCESSORS: YOU CAN'T LIVE 
WITHOUT ONE 

"The first thing to look at . . . one of the best reasons 
for owning a computer . . . it's vita! for letters alone . . . 
no family can be without one." It's hard to hyperbolize 
the value of word processors. 

Bank Street Writer was recommended most often for 
beginners, for folks who write only once in a while, and 
sometimes for the whole family. Available for most major 
computers (see the software directory Jor JuU availabll- 



CADET 




SAT 





Ti 



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jiS 



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rtlvi 



ity information]. Bank Street Writer won high praise for 
its simplicity and usefulness. 

Novice users should also look at Magic Slate ("Ex- 
pands from 20^ to 40- to 80-columns to fit your 
needs."); MasterType's Writer ("My nine-year-old took it 
as her own."); Letter-Writer for the Tandy Models I. HI and 
4 ("Does form letters and split-screen."); and Aiari 
Writer ("The standard for the Atari"). 

Most modern word processors will help you put your 
thoughts down more easily than when using a pen or 
typewriter. So when you need the "extra" that simple 
packages don't offer, "focus your attention on accessory 
features. These might include complex formatting for 
newsletters, footnoting for scholarly works, and file com- 
patibility with data-base, spreadsheet, or telecommunica- 
tions programs. Macros are another desirable function. 
They ease repetitive writing by allowing you to insert 
often-used phrases, sentences, or even whole paragraphs 
by pressing one or two keys. 

Like Bank Street Writer, PFSiWrite is available for 
most computers and is easy for both children and 
adults. PFS.Write. however, offers more features, such as 
greater control of your printer, and spreadsheet or tele- 
communications compatibility. 

Writing tools recommended for specific machines in- 
clude the easy-to-use Creatine Writer on the C 64 and old 
standbys like Scripsif. which has numerous add-ons, in- 
cluding a grammar checker (for Tandy Models I, III and 
4). Te;eLiJriter-64 lets users of Tandy Color Computers 
start writing minutes after it's unwrapped. 

When you need a high degree of printer control, 
check out Apple Writer I!, Letter Perject for the Atari, or 
Paperclip for the Atari and C 64/128. These programs 
have more features than the family possibly needs, but 
it's nice to have the power in reserve. {For more injorma- 
tion see "Word Processors: New Tools for an Age-Old 
Task" in the November 1985 fa.mily computing. ) 

INTECRATEP VS. STAND-ALONE 

Some software gives you more than just a word pro- 
cessor. Integrated packages that also contain a data base 
and a spreadsheet are very popular. They make it relative- 
ly easy to transfer information across applications and 
quickly switch back and forth between them. Those arc 
their strengths. The Achilles' heel of integration is com- 
mon to most jack-of-all-trades: it is master of none. If 
you're writing all the time, for instance, use a stand-alone 
word-processing program. You'll generally get greater 
power and more features from a program that doesn't 
need to share precious memory or disk space with other 
applications. 

AppleWorks, the best-selling software package in 
America, came showered with praise from our panel, too; 
"The best . . . almost too easy . . . more fun to use than 
other programs." Here, in one program, is all the produc- 
tivity power many families will ever need. The data-base 
module, in particular, is quick and especially easy. Still, 
you will run into limitations if you want to do any one 
thing in depth. 

Integrated software is voracious in eating up memo- 
ry. That's why you won't find many versions for older 
machines like the C 64. TRIO is an exception. Organized 
along the same lines as AppleWorks (data-base or spread- 
sheet files are inserted into the word processor). TRIO 
does a credible job with a mere 64K, 

You can also integrate information from individual 
packages that work together. Three examples include the 
PFS, Bank Street, and Creative software series. Each 
offers separate programs-word processors, filers, spread- 
sheets, and even some spelling checkers and business 
graphics -all of which work together. This allows you to 




Mi<i^ 



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Laboratory 



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[UtorJ 



MMUI 

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1 



expand and spend as your needs and wallet grow. There's 
a tendency, however, to become locked into a single se- 
ries, where each package may not be equal in quality. 
You don't have to play the game that way. For exam- 
ple, the menu-driven SyriFile + and SynCalc data-base 
and spreadsheet programs are considered the best of 
their kind for the Atari. You can transfer files from either 
into Atari Writer— creating an "integrated series" from 
two companies' products. 

KEEPING GOOD ACCOUNT OF YOUR LIFE 

When used in the home, a file manager or number- 
cruncher need not be as powerful as the ones employed in 
a business. Since knowing how to use data-base pro- 
grams is becoming a basic required skill in the computer- 
ized world, their use in the home can be construed as 
being educational. Bank Street Filer, which shares infor- 
mation with Bank Street Writer, is a good intro for kids 
starting off. 

One panelist spoke thus about PFS:Write's compan- 
ion data-base program; "My 14-year-old is computcrpho- 
bic, but she finds it easy to set up PFS.File to do a wide 
range of things for her school work." Yet this data base is 
not just for kids. It's just easy, with full screens that you 
arrange into the forms you want, then fill in. 

Spreadsheets are one way of tracking your taxes, 
budgeting, and accounting. You can't go wrong with the 
inexpensive My Calc for the IBM PC. (It appeared as a 
"best buy" in family computing's May 1985 cover story 
"Spreadsheets: New Tools for Decision-Making.") Apple II 
users will like PractiCalc for price, too. in addition to its 
many math functions. Multiplan's long-term popularity 
means you'll find file-transfer compatibility with pro- 
grams such as AppleWorks. The Mac version of Multi- 
plan can be more fun than other machines' because of 
the mouse interface. Point-and-click is a natural method 
for moving around the grid-like ceils of a spreadsheet. 

You might prefer a spreadsheet's flexible layout for 
your money management. Some critics felt that packages 
dedicated to personal finance "generally don't handle 
home accounting the way people actually work." 

But the imposed structure of home budgeting and 
finance software is attractive to many. (See Home/Money 
Management In this issue.] Home Accountant is good if 
you commit your time to it and is very comprehen- 
sive. The best-selling Managing Your Money is available ^^...l^ 
in an upgraded version for the IBM PC and contains more 
than one hundred new features. For simplicity and accu- 
racy. Time Is Money is an excellent home accounting 
choice. 



IT DEPENDS HOW OLD YOU ARE 

If you live with younger children, look for programs 
to help them grow accustomed to the computer. Especial- 
ly good are packages they can use without the aid of an 
adult. Mickey's Space Adventures, starring the famous 
mouse; Pacemaker, for kids upto age 7; Early Games/or 
Young Children; and Kids on Keys were judged winners 
in this category. 

Panelists with kids over the age of 10 extolled the fun 
and learning to be found in Rocky's Boots, a game of 
Boolean logic (the "on/ofr' logic used by every computer). 
"It will go down as a classic," one panelist said. Also for 
the 10 and older age group, the Snooper Troops series is 
a painless way to introduce computer concepts. 

Computers can accomplish a wide variety of activi- 
ties. That's their wonder and their puzzle. To increase 
that getting-to-know-you feeling, the reviewers strongly 
suggested the iWicrozine series. Among the comments; 
"Each disk contains several programs . . . It's always in- 
teresting and always well-done, spans a wide age range 



iiil h 





BAR^ lKi5?-j'^' 




CADIT 




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'T.'W 


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P6D0L 



WHAT 

TO LOOK FOR 

WHEN SHOPPING 

FOR SOFTWARE 



When they talk about "compatlbitity," computer folks are 
basically asking, "Will it work together?" The variety of 
areas that comprise "it." however, are what keeps shop- 
pers (as well as software designers) on their toes. To build 
your software library on a firm foundation, all the parts 
must fit in. Stop before buying any piece of software, and 
ask yourself these questions: 

1. Is this software for your brand of computer? 
Don't overlook the obvious. If your machine is an older 
model (e.g.. an Apple II plus), will new sofware still run on 
it? If you have an IBM "clone," does it emulate the origi- 
nal machine closely enough to run all off-the-shelf pack- 
ages? Remember that compatibility sometimes comes in 
shades of gray, not solely black or white. 

a. Even if it's the right software for the right ma- 
chine, do you have enough memory? Do you need an 80- 
column display, or will a 40-column do? Hardware re- 
quirements are usually indicated right on the box. 
What are the configuration requirements? Programs 
have many demands. One won't work without Uvo disk 
drives; another needs a mouse, a color monitor, a specific 
brand of printer interface card, or some other attachment 
you find you don't have when you get home. 

3. Will this program work with your printer? This is 
especially important with graphics programs. Does this 
word processor allow access to your printer's capacity for 
boldface, underlining, italics, etc.? Look in the software 
manual; it should indicate which printers are compati- 
ble. If you don't own a printer yet, but are buying soft- 
ware now, look for flexibility in printer configuration. 

4. Can this program work with your existing soft- 
ware? For instance, are the notes created by your word 
processor going to load into the new telecommunications 
package you're thinking of purchasing or have just ac- 
quired? 

5. Speaking of telecommunications software, will it 
work with your modem? This area of compatibility can be 
murky, so be particularly sure before buying. {See the 
"Buyer's Guide to Modems" on page 46 in this issue.) If 
you don't own a modem yet, first find hardware and 
software with designs that will work together (not neces- 
sarily from the same company); then buy. 

6. Is there a return policy? Protect yourself when 
shopping. First, it's your responsibility to know your own 
hardware setup. Then, after asking the salespeople and 
checking in the manual for the configuration require- 
ments, find out if the software can be returned if for 
some reason it's still not compatible. 

7. What are the manufacturer's warranty specifica- 
tions? Is the disk protected for a mere 30 days, a full year, 
or even a "lifetime"? The ultimate warranty is the ab- 
sence of copy protection. That allows you to make a back- 
up and always use the copy, storing the original in a safe 
place. What's the policy on upgrades? If a snazzy new 
version of your program is released, can you get it free or 
for a nominal charge? Or will the tariff be stiffer? 

One way to supplement your software library lies in 
the public domain. Join a user's group. Not only can you 
share questions with others, but there are lots of public- 
domain programs available for approximately the cost of 
a disk. Then you can see the types of software available 
and find out what you actually need. 



and covers many topics . . . It's unusually varied: a nice 
sampling for a family just beginning." 

Nontypists wisely buy one of the many typing pro- 
grams when they pick up their computers. Typing Tutor 
III was mentioned by name for all ages. The choice for 
children up to 14 was MasterType. 






I 



B 

r 




THE ARTS AND JUST PLAIN FUN 

Print Shop. Print Shop. Print Shop. Now say it a few 
more times and you II sound like our reviewers. Here's an 
instant gratification program for the entire family since 
it's so easy and gives such tangible results. Mix and 
match text, pictures, and borders to make greeting cards, 
signs, and banners. Dozens of pictures come with the 
main disk, and three volumes of Graphics Library "clip 
art" disks add hundreds more. 

For quality print-shop capabilities at an almost-pro- 
fessional level, consider two equivalent, but somewhat 
different page-layout programs for the Macintosh. Mac- 
Publisher is better for multiple-page documents, such as 
newsletters. For single-page layouts. ReadySetGo is sim- 
pler. However, you can create single- and multiple-page 
documents with both. 

The exciting Dazzle Draw allows the highest resolu- 
tion available on a 128K Apple. With pull-down menus 
like the Mac, it's fun right out of the box. Blazing Pad- 
dles (another point-and-choosc drawing and painting 
program) shares the same direct simplicity. Both support 
many popular printers when you want a hard copy of 
your art treasures. 

As with all art. you need the right tools for the job. 
While joysticks suffice, they're like using the side of a 
wrench to drive a nail when you really need a hammer. 
When it comes to drawing, most users think the mouse is 
a better "mousetrap." 

Actually, even though this is an article on software, 
quite a few panelists suggested you buy hardware in the 
form of input devices. Mentioned most was the KoalaPad. 
Draw on the pad as you would on paper, and the Images 
appear on-screen. The Koala Pad doesn't work without 
software, but it does come with KoalaPainter. Many 
third-party software packages allow you to use the Koala 
Pad; Blazing Paddles is a good example. 

Animation takes particular patience, but it can be 
exceptionally rewarding. Mouie Maker exploits the com- 
puter in a way you couldn't have done before. In that 
sense, it teaches you more about how computers work i^, 
than a word processor, which extends your abilities in an '^.. 
area you're already experienced in. 

Among the lower-priced computers, the superior La 
sound chips found in the C 64 and the Atari shoot them 
to the top when it comes to software for making music. 
The Music Studio for the C 64 adds stimulating graphics 
to music. Younger kids who want quick results probably 
would like Tom Snyder's Rock 'N' Rhythm. The Music 
Shop. Songwriter (lauded for its simplicity), and Music 
Construction Set received honorable mentions. Remem- 
ber that these programs will not sing as sweetly on an 
Apple II or an IBM PC, due to those machines' limited. 
one-voice sound capabilities (unless you get an add-on 
board for music). 

Games are included in our panel's basic software 
library, but it's a rare game that makes it. Find programs 
for games you already play, like Sargon III for chess or I 
Charles Goren's Learning Bridge Made Easy. Would-be 
pilots were advised to buy the famous Flight Simulator U, 
since it "teaches a lot about interacting with the comput- 
er, reading the screen, and responding to detail." 

Infocom's introductory adventure games, particularly 
Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy and Planetjall. fit into 
the software library, too. "Such games teach logic and [^ 

UAi;j(»s 



4 



i 



SAT 





that computers are literal machines . . . Truly fun and 
educational . . . They increase your sense of interactivity 
with the computer," the reviewers said. 

PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES 

Most languages come on disks purchased separately. 
Even though BASIC is built into some machines or comes 
on a disk as part of the package, utility programs that 
assist in creating lines of code become essential. You'll 
need software for writing software. 

With its primary use in the schools and because it 
creates immediate results on-screen. Logo is the lan- 
guage panelists mentioned first for kids. Find out which 
version of Logo is used in your child's class. In the home, 
realize that most children can't program on their own at 
the beginning, so you'll have to help. 

Two hints if you're playing with BASIC on an Apple 
II: You'll build a firm foundation by working through the 
Applesoft Tutorial, a book/disk combination. Although 
not part of the original panel, one editor insisted we tell 
you about the Global Program Line Editor (GPLE) from 
Beagle Bros. He called it "an absolute necessity" because 
it makes editing your programs as easy as editing with a 
word processor. 

Our FAMILY COMPUTING technical editor, an Atari afficlo- 
nado, talked of getting a good line-renumbering program, 
particularly Extended BASIC 1.0. This is public-domain 
software, so try to find a copy through a local users' 



FAMILY COMPUTING'S PANEL OF REVIEWERS 


SHARON ZARDETTO AKER. 


LARRY KRENGEL, 


G\\'EN' SOLOMON, 


Sussex. NJ 


Marengo. IL 


Spring Valley. NY 


FRANCIS AMATO, 


GLEN MCCARTNEY, 


TAN A. SUMMERS, 


Deer Park. NY 


Slaten Island. NY 


Metairie. LA 


MARLENE BUMGARNER 


STEVE MOROENSTERN. 


KEN VVILDMAN. 


ELTGROTH, 


Brightwaters. NY 


Ado. OH 


Morgan Hill. CA 


TON".' MORRIS, 


DAVID W[LSO,V, 


CATHY FRANK, 


Ann Arbor, MI 


Newton. MA 


South Burlington. VT 


NORMA ODISIO, 


JUDITH ZORNBERG. 




Mesa, AZ 


Brooklyn. NY 




ROBIN RASKIN, 






New York. NY 






group. You can download it from CompuServe if you have 
a modem. 

Turbo Pascal is a "must get" If you want to program 
on an IBM PC or compatible. This is a popular version of 
the programming language tested by the Educational 
Testing Ser\'ice (the same folks who administer the SATs 
and GREs). A Turbo Tutor disk is available to increase 
your learning curve. 

MACHINE-SPECIFIC SUGGESTIONS 

Some software solves machine-specific problems. For 
example, those tortoise-like disk drives on the C 64 waste 
time and patience. Disk operating system speed-up car- 
tridges such as Fast Load and Mach-5 relieve the di- 
lemma. 

Some software has been written mainly for one ma- 
chine. On an IBM PC or compatible, there's SideKick. 
Without disturbing your main program (word processor, 
spreadsheet, etc.) this utility "pops up" at the press of a 
key. With a Swiss-pocket-knife effect, out comes a phone 
dialer and directory, a note pad, calendar, datebook, and 
more. Simple and direct, SideKick can make the comput- 
er useful right off the bat. 

BEFORE YOU GO 

After being involved with computers for a while, 
you'll find lots of software available, with more on 
the way all the time. There are many packages on the 
market with myriad promises of time to be saved, sub- 
jects to be mastered, or games to be won. Out of this 
cornucopia comes much good software, some real tur- 
keys, but few "greats." The choices aren't easy. An honest 
response to "What should I buy?" Is rarely absolutely this 
or definitely that. 

In many respects, the guidelines given above are con- 
servative, which is to say, tested by time. Each panelist 
wanted to be as sure as possible when making recom- 
mendations about how to invest your money and time. 
That your favorite piece of software is not listed here, 
however, means nothing. The final authority for what 
you need can only be you. 



DARPN 



CADE7 




THE SOFTWARE LIBRARY 
DIRECTORY 





Unless otherwise siaied. mini- 
mum memory requiremenLs 
aic 48K Apple II series, 48K 
Atari. 128K IBM PC/PCjr or 
compatibles, and I28K Macin- 
tosh. 

Applesoft futtriali Addison- 
Weslev Publishing Co.. 1 Jacob 
Way," Reading. MA 01867; 
1617) 944-3700. Available for 
Apple II. S30. 

AppleWorkii Apple Compuier, 
20525 Marianl Ave., Cuperti- 
no. CA 95014: (408) 996-1010. 
Available for Apple He (128K 
recommended) and lie. S250. 

Apple Writer II: (see Apple- 
Works for manufaclurer. ad- 
dress, and phone). Available for 
Apple Ile/Ilc. S149. 

Atari Writer: Atari, Inc.. 1312 
Crossman Ave., Sunnyvale, CA 
94088: (800) 538-8543. Avail- 
able for Atari. $100. 

Bank Street Writer and Bank 
Street Filer: Broderbund Soft- 
ware. 17 Paul Drive. San Ra- 
fael, CA 94903: (415) 479- 
1170. Recommended for 64K 
Apple II and IBM PC/PCjr. S70- 
$80. Also for Atari and C 64. 
$50. 

Bloiing Paddles: Baudville, 
1001 -Medical Park Drive S.E.. 
Grand Rapids. MI 49406: (616) 
957-3036. AvaiJable for Apple II 
andC64.S50{Apple):S35(C64). 

Charles Ceren: Learning Bridge 
Made Easy: CBS Software. One 
Fawcett Place. Greenwich. CT 
06836: (203) 622-2525. Avail- 
able for Apple 11, C 64. and IBM 
PC. S80, 

Creative Writers Creative Soft- 
ware. P.O. Box 61688, Sunnv- 
vale, CA 94086; (408) 744- 
0663. Recommended for C 64. 
S50. Also for Apple II and IBM 
PCPCjr. S60-S80. 

Daxtle Draw: (see Bank Street 
for manufacturer, address, and 
phone). Available for 128K Ap- 
ple llc/Ilc. S60. 

Early Canes For Yeung Cliildren: 
Sprinjiboard Software. 7808 
Creckridge Circle. Minneapo- 
lis. MN 55435: (612) 944-3915. 
Available for Apple 11. Atari. 
C 64, and IBM PC/PCjr. S35. 

Extended BASIC i.Oi Public -do- 
main software. Available for 
Atari- Obtain a copy through 
an Atari users' group or down- 
load via CompuServe. 

Facemaker; Spinnaker. One 
Kendall Square. Cambridge. 
MA 02139; (617) 494-1200. 
Available for Apple 11, Atari, 
C 64. and IBM PC/PCjr. $21- 
S25. 

Fast load: Epw. 1043 Kiel 
Court, Sunn>T,'ale, CA 94089: 
(408) 745-0700. Available for 
C 64. $36. 

rrigiit Simulator II: subLOClC, 
713 Edgebrook Drive, Cham- 
paign. IL 61820: (217) 359- 
8482. Available for Apple II. 



Atari, and C 64. IBM PC/PCjr 
version available from Micro- 
,soft (sec Mu(tipian for address 
and phone). S50. 

Clebal Pfogram Line Editor 
(CPLE): Beagle Bros., Inc.. 3990 
Old Town Ave.. Suite 102C. 
San Diego. CA 92110: (619) 
296-6400. Available for Apple 
II. S50. 

Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy: 
Infocom. 55 Wheeler St.. Cam- 
bridge. MA 02138: (617) 492- 
1031. Available for Apple H. 
Atari, C 64, IBM PC/PCjr. Mac- 
intosh, and Tandy Model III. 
$35-^40. 

Heme Acteuniant: Haba-Arrays. 
6711 Valjean Ave., Van Nuys, 
CA 91406; (818) 994-1899. 
Available for Apple II, Atari, 
IBM PC/PCjr, and Macintosh. 
$75-$ 150. 

KealaPad: Koala Technologies 
Corp., 3100 Patrick Henry 
Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95052; 
(800) KOA-BEAR. Available for 
Apple II, Atari, C 64, and IBM 
PC/PCjY. Sl00-$:50. Koala- 
Painter included. 

Kids On Keys: (see Facemaker 
for manufacturer, address, and 
phone) -Available for Apple II, 
Atari, C 64, IBM PC/PCjr. S21- 
S25. 

Letter Perfect: LJK Enter- 
prises, 7852 Big Bend Blvd.. 
St. Louis. MO 63119: (314) 
962-1855. Recommended for 
32K Atari. Also for Apple II and 
IBM PC/PC/r. $100. 

Letter<Writer: Astro-Star En- 
terprises. 5905 Stone Hill 
Drive. Rocklin, CA 95677: 
(916) 624-3709. Recommend- 
ed forTandv Models I/1I1/4. Also 
for IBM PC/PC;r, $48, 

MACH'S; Access Software Inc, 
2561 S. 1560 VV.. Woods Cross. 
UT 84087: (801) 973-0123. 
Available for C 64. S35. 

MacPublisher: Boston Soft- 
ware Publishers. Inc.. 1260 
Boylslon St.. BostonJ MA 
02215: (617) 267-4747. Avail- 
able for Macintosh. SI 00. 

Magit Slote: Sunburst Com- 
munications. 39 Washington 
Ave., Pleasanlville, NY 10570: 
(800) 431-6616, Available for 
Apple II I64K or 128K required 
for some features). S90. 

Andrew Tobias' Managing Tour 
Money: MECA, 285 Riverside 
Ave., Westport, CT 06880; 
(203) 222-1000. Available for 
128K Apple lle/Uc and IBM PC, 
256K PCjr, S199. 

MasterType; The Scarborough 
System. 55 S. Broadway, Tar- 
tT^'lown, N\' 10591: [914) 332- 
4545. Available for Apple 11, 
Atari, C 64. IBM PC/PC/r, and 
Macintosh. S40. 

MaslerType's Writer: (see Mas- 
terType for manufaclurer, ad- 
dress, and phone) . Available 
for !28K Apple He/llc. S70. 



Planned for C 64/128. S45. 

Mickey's Space Adventures: Si- 
erra On-Line, P.O, Bo.x 485. 
Coarsegold, CA 93614: (209) 
683-6858. Available for Apple 
II. C 64. and IBM PC/PCjr. 
S25-$30. 

Micrexine, Vols. 1-13: Scholas- 
tic Software, 730 Broadway, 
New York, NY 10003: (212) 
505-3501. Available for Apple II. 
First issue, S15: $30 there- 
after. 

Movie Maker; (see Music Con- 
struction Set for manufacturer, 
address, and phone). Available 
for Apple II, Atari, and C 64. 
S33-S40. 

Muitipioni Microsoft Corp.. 
10700 Northup Wav, Bellevue, 
WA 98009: (206) "828-8080. 
Available for Apple II. IBM PC/ 
PCjr, and Macintosh. SI25 (Ap- 
ple): $195 (IBM, Mac), C 64 ver- 
sion distributed by Epyx. Inc, 
(See Fast Load for address 
and phone.) S50-$60. 

Music Construction Set: Elec- 
tronic Arts. 2755 Campus 
Drive. San Mateo. CA 94403: 
(415) 571-7171. Recommend- 
ed ibr Atari and C 64. Also for 
Apple and IBM PC/PC/r. S23- 
$40. 

The Music Shop: (see Bank 
Street for manufacturer, ad- 
dress, and phone). Available for 
C 64. S45. 

fhe Music Studio: Activlsion. 
2350 Bay-shore Frontage Road, 
Mountain View, CA 94043: 

(415) 960-0410. Available for 
C 64. S30. 

MYCAIC: Computer Easy. 414 
E. Southern, Tempe, AZ 
85282; (602) 829-9614, Avail- 
able for IBM PC/PCjr, $20. 

Paperclip: Batteries Included. 
30 Mural St.. Richmond Hill. 
Ontario. L4B 1B5 Canada; 

(416) 881-9941. Available for 
Atari and C 64/128. S60 
(Atari): $90 (C 64/128). 

PFS: Write and PFS;rile: Soft- 
ware Publishing Corp.. 1901 
Landings Drive. Mountain 
View. CA 94043; (415) 962- 
8910. Available for 64K Apple 
lle/llc with 80 col. card, C 64, 
and IBM PC/PCjr, $125 (Apple): 
S80 (C 64); S140 (IBM). 

Planetfalh (see Hitchhiker's 
Guide for manufacturer, ad- 
dress, phone, and availability), 
S39 to S40. 

PractiCaic II: PractiCorp. 44 
Oak St.. The Silk Mill, Newton 
Upper Falls, MA 02164: (617) 
965-9870. Available for Apple 
II. S50. 

The Print Shop and The Print 
Shop Graphics Library, Vols. 1-3: 
(see Bank Street for manufac- 
turer, address, and phone). 
Available for Apple II, Atari, 
and C 64. S45--$50 (Print 
Shop): S25 each [Graphics Li- 
brary]. 



I ReedySetCo: Manhattan 
Graphics Corp., 163 Varick 
St.. New York, NY 10013; (212) 
989-6442. Available for 512K 
Macintosh. S125. 

Rock 'H' Rhythm; (see Face- 
maker for manufacturer, ad- 
dress, and phone). Available for 
Atari and C 64. S27, 

Rocky's Boots: The Learning 
Company. 545 Middlefield 
Road. Suite 170, Menlo Park. 
CA 94025: (415) 328-5410. 
Available for Apple II. C 64. and 
Tandv CoCo. Planned for IBM 
PC/PC; r, $50. 

Sargon III! Havdcn Software. 
600 Suffolk St.. Lowell, MA 
01854; (800) 343-1218. Avail- 
able for 64K Apple 11, C 64, IBM 
PC/PCjr, and Macintosh. S50. 

Scripsit; Tandy Corp., 1800 
One Tandv Center. Ft. Worth. 
TX 76102: (817) 338-2335 
Available for Tandy Models 1/111/ 
4- S40. 

SideKick: Borland Interna- 
tional. 4585 Scotts Valley 
Drive. Scotts Vallev. CA 95066: 
(800) 556-2283. Recommend- 
ed for IBM PC/XT. Also for Mac- 
intosh. S55 (copv-protected): 
S85 (copyabJe). 

Snooper Troops, Case No.l and 1: 
(sec Facemaker for manufac- 
turer, address, and phone), 
AvaDable for Apple II, Atari, 
C 64, and IBM PC/PCjT. S27- 
S33 each. 

Songwriter; (see MasterType 
for manufaclurer. address, and 
phone) .AvaDable for Apple II. 
Atari, C 64, and IBM PC/PCjr. 
S20. 

SynCalc and SynFlie-i-; Syn- 
apse, a division of Broderbund 
(see Bank Street for address 
and phone). Recommended for 
Atari. SoO each. SynCalc also 
for Apple II and C 64. 

Telewriter<64: Cognitec. 704 
N- Nob St.. Del Mar. CA 92014: 
(619) 755-1258. Available for 
Tandy Color Cotnputer. $50 
(tape)': S60 (disk). 

Time Is Money: Turning Point 
Software. 1 lA Main St., Water- 
town. MA 02172; (617) 923- 
444 1 . Available for Apple II and 
IBM PC/PC/r. $I00-$125. 

TRIO: Soflsyne. Inc.. 162 
Madison Ave., New York, NY 
10016: (212) 685-2080. Rec- 
ommended for C 64/128. Also 
for 128K Apple lle/IIc. SI 00 
(Apple): $70 (C 64/128). 

Turbo Pascal and Turbo Tutor: 
(see Sidelciclc for manufactur- 
er, address, and phone). Avail- 
able for IBM PC and CP/M ma- 
chines (such as KavT^ro), S70 
(Pascal): $35 (Tutor)". 

Typing Tutor ill; Simon & 
Schuster. 1230 Ave. of the 
Americas. New York. N^' 10020: 
(212) 245-6400. Available for 
Api>le II, C 64. IBM PC/PCjr, 
and Macintosh. S40-S60. iK; 



How to Keep Your 
Computer 

Healthy 



SEVEN LAWS 
OF PREVENTIVE 
MEDICINE 

BY GEORGi DELUCENAY LEON 



A 



large part of the success you and 
your family will enjoy with your computer de- 
pends on how you set it up. It is up to you to 
decide where to put it, how much desk space 
you need and what type of lighting or access 
best satisfies your family's needs. Equally im- 
portant, if less obvious, are the choices you 
make about how to set up the system to avoid 
unnecessary repairs and promote reliable, 
long-lasting performance. 

It pays to spend a little time organizing your 
work area so that it suits your computer as 
well as your family. Regardless of how much 
space you have (a corner of your den or an 
entire computer room), how many members of 
your family use the computer, or how many 
components there are to your system, there 
are a few basic factors — wiring, ventilation, dirt 
and dust, static electricity buildup, tempera- 
ture, and stability of Installation — that can di- 
rectly affect how well your computer functions. 
Keep them in mind not only when bringing a 
computer into your home for the first time, 
but also whenever you add a peripheral to your 
system or select a new piece of computer furni- 
ture. 

(l) WIRING 

Since computers depend on electricity to 
function, the arrangement and reliability of 
your home's electric system will be critical to 
where you place your computer and the way it 
works. The availability of outlets (particularly 
grounded ones), the location of other electrical 
appliances in the house, and the overall stabil- 
ity of your incoming power supply should all 
affect how and where you set up your system. 

Most computers, monitors, and printers 
have electrical cords that end in three-prong 




plugs. These should be inserted into three- 
prong grounded outlets. The location of the 
grounded outlets in your home will therefore 
partially determine where you should place 
your system. What if you don"t have such an 
outlet? If yours is an older dwelling with only 
the more familiar two-prong outlets, don't de- 
spair. You can, in most cases, still use a com- 
puter by installing a grounded adapter onto 
your chosen outlet. 

Grounded adapters cost approximately 45 
cents and look like a two-prong plug with a 
small wire or metal loop attached. Pull out the 
fuse, or pull down the circuit breaker connect- 
ed to the line before you begin converting a 
two-prong outlet to a grounded one. First re- 
move the screw from the center of the wall 
plate. Use steel wool to get the screw bright 
and shiny. Then scratch the paint away from 
the wall plate where the screw makes contact. 
Plug the adapter into the two holes of the out- 
let and loop the wire over the screw. Your con- 
nection is now grounded. 

Even if your home does have grounded 
outlets, if they support other heavy appliances 
it might be wiser to install an adapter and 
locate the computer elsewhere in the house. 
Connecting the computer to the same line you 
use for your refrigerator or air conditioner can 
severely tax the line and cause loss of data, 
glitches, and other problems, if the lights in 
the room dim evety time the refrigerator goes 
on. the chances of losing data from the com- 
puter are high. 

If the problem stems from a fault in the 
wiring of one of your appliances, have the unit 
fixed. If. on the other hand, the electrical cur- 
rent in your home frequently fluctuates as a 
result of erratic power supply, consider pur- 



GEOHGE DELUCENAY LEON 

Hues in Brooklyn, New 
York, and writes about 
high technology. 

JANUARY 1986 41 



THE ONLY WAY 

TO PROTECT THE 

COMPUTER 

AGAINST OIRT IS 

TO SET A RULE 

FOR KEEPING 

FOOD, DRINKS, 

AND CIGARETTES 

COMPLETELY 

AWAY FROM THE 

COMPUTER. 



chasing a surge protector. Utility companies 
furnish voltage at approximately 110 volts. 
However, the electricity may fluctuate between 
90 and 130 volts during the day. Most comput- 
ers are not badly affected by these fluctuations 
since they usually take place slowly. But there 
are times when a surge of voltage will sweep 
across a line — during electrical storms, for ex- 
ample, and after brownouts or blackouts. 
Surges such as these can badly damage or 
sometimes even destroy an unprotected com- 
puter. While a fuse or circuit breaker will theo- 
retically switch off a surge, they can't do it fast 
enough to protect delicate electronics. Surge 
protectors (which range in price from S50- 
S150) can switch off electrical charges before 
they enter your computer or printer. Look for 
surge protectors that will cut off a surge in 
"picoseconds" (1 trilUonth of a second); many 
come conveniently housed in four- and six- 
outlet power strips, so that whenever the com- 
puter is on. their protection switches on auto- 
matically. 



HEALTHY SOFTWARE 

Here's what I've done to care for my computer librarj'. I admit it. 1 like being 
organized. And I like to And the disk I want when I want it. I also heed the "do 
and don't " warnings on the back of disk envelopes. Do you? 

ShorOy after I brought my Apple home, I bought various disk boxes. Each 
cost about S20 — all you need to spend unless you're getting a fancy oak case 
or one with a lock. The box silling al my right hand, with the hinged cover 
and five partitions, holds about 40 of the disks I use most regularly. Ads 
claim the box holds 50. but it's not healthy to squash them. 

Disks are arranged by application; those that get used together, stay 
together. So my Apple Writer program and data disks occupy the first niche, 
right in front of my wife's data disks in the second. A third niche contains 
programs I've written. 

It's easy to keep categories separate because I plan ahead. I color code. 
That's why the labels tucked in when you buy disks often come in different 
colors. 1 use the red ones for Apple Writer, the blue for BASIC. However, all 
my disks are like the Ford Model T — they come in any color, as long as it's 
black. Sometimes I'm tempted to get those disks that are yellow or green or 
high-tech silver. Then I couid really refine my color coding. 

The other type of disk box I purchased is often called a "library case." It 
costs about three to five bucks and holds 10 disks — a perfect size for storing 
the originals of copyabie programs or my older data disks. They also come in 
handy when I take my disks traveling. 

Do you throw out the neat cardboard boxes your blank disks come in? 
While not as durable as a plastic case, you can't beat the price. I store my less 
important disks in them, with appropriate labels on each box. 

Some of my disks don't live in cases. Many games stay in their original 
cartons, along with Iheir easily misplaced reference cards and pamphleted 
instructions — as long as the carton fits in the small bookcase I've dedicated 
to all my computer stuff, that is. 

Yes. there's more stuff: What about the books on programming or online 
services? And those books that arrive disguised as "manuals" or "documen- 
tation. "They're set up on the middle shelf; productivity to the right, graphics 
to the left, and programming in the center. Librai^' cases stand in a row on 
the top shelf, game cartons line the bottom. I like my computer bookcase. 

When friends borrow software, 1 attach a sticker with my name and ad- 
dress on each disk. I never write directly on the label (that's one of those no- 
no's from the back of disk envelopes) and I don't use cellophane tape to 
attach the sticker. Tape could detach inside the disk drive, requiring repairs. 
Who needs that? 

With kids, however, all of this carefully planned order could easily go right 
out the window. For families I recommend dedicating a disk case just for the 
kids' use. That way, they could at least easily put disks away, safe from dirt or 
pop. Alternatively, you could ask them to store cartridges or cassettes in a 
sturdy shoebox. And you could use stickers to color-code both box and 
program by category — educational software in one shade, games in another. 
Your next job would be to convince the little ones to match purple with 
purple, for example, and orange with orange. Good luck! 

That's what it's all about: a lot of care and a little luck. I take care of my 
software library and it takes care of me. — david hallei^man 



42 FAMILY COMPUTING 



(i) VENTILATION 

As electricity courses through the comput- 
er's internal wiring, heat starts building up 
inside its tough, plastic frame. If the heat gets 
too great, the monitor (or TV) will start devel- 
oping waves, data in memory will be lost, and, 
in a worst-case scenario, wires will start melt- 
ing and the computer will have to be sent out 
for repair. To avoid all this, computers come 
with vents to keep cool air circulating. 

Wherever and however you decide to set up 
your computer, it is imperative to keep these 
vents free from obstructions and open to good 
air flow. If your computer has vents at the back 
or on the sides, do not place the unit against a 
wall or in a tight cabinet shelf. Likewise, if the 
vents are on the top of the system, you should 
not stack other peripherals directly over the 
computer. If space is at a premium, consider 
buying or building a stand that can support 
your monitor or disk drives, yet has enough 
room underneath for your computer to 
breathe. If a vertical solution is not ideal, try 
moving your printer to a nearby table; you do 
not have to cluster your whole system together 
in one spot. By getting longer cables than 
those that came with your system, you can 
often conveniently spread your equipment 
around. Note: Do not get carried away with 
over-long (15-30 feel) cables, since they can 
take on the unpleasant characteristics of an 
antenna and interfere not only with the opera- 
tion of the computer, but with your TV recep- 
tion as well. 

(3)d|RT AND DUST 

The delicate electronics of the computer 
are easily (and always adversely) affected by 
dust, dirt, liquids, and smoke. And. despite 
the hard, compact shell that surrounds it, the 
computer is in many ways wide open to infil- 
tration by all kinds of foreign particles. The 
vents that provide air circulation are prime 
catchers of cigarette ash. drips of soda, cookie 
crumbs, etc., as are the little spaces between 
the keys of the keyboard. The slot in the disk 
drive is another perfect opening for all sorts of 
damaging grime. 

The only way to protect the computer 
against dirt is to set. and rigorously maintain. 
a rule for keeping food, drinks, and cigarettes 
completely out of the computer room. If your 
kitchen and dining room are too far away to 
make this feasible, select or construct a place 
in the computer room, as distant as possible 
from the system, where all such consumables 
can be stashed. Otherwise you will find thai it 
is all too easy to knock over a glass and have 
an instantly nonworking computer on your 
hands. 

When not in use, your equipment should 
be shielded from the buildup of dust in the air 
with nonstatic covers. Commercially made 
ones are available for every computer brand 
and peripheral. Alternatively, you can cover 
the equipment with well-washed towels or 




sheets. Make sure they cover the system com- 
pletely, and that you wash them once a week. 
Even the best cared for computer system, 
however, needs a cleaning approximately 
every three months. You can either have it 
done professionally or do it yourself. (See the 
"Hands On" series in family computing, begin- 
ning October 1985. Jor more information on 
doing ii yourself.) 

(4)STATIC ELECTRICITY 

One of your computer's worst enemies is 
static electricity: an invisible agent that can, 
without warning, wipe out information on 
your disks or render your system inoperable. 
The spark you see, or sudden tingle you feel 
when you walk across a rug and touch a metal 
surface, such as a door knob, doesn't harm 
you because the current is so low. It can be 
fatal, however, to the chips In your computer 
or printer. There are two ways to avoid the 
damaging effects of static: by preventing its 
buildup or by getting rid of it through safe 
discharge. When choosing a place to put your 
computer, consider an uncarpeted room. If 



that doesn't work, there are a number of pre- 
cautions which can lessen your chances of 
zapping a computer with static. 

Place antistatic mats either under your 
keyboard, or on the floor under your worksta- 
tion, to siphon off static built up from walking 
across the carpet. These mats can range in 
price anywhere from S40 to Si 50, depending 
on their size. There are also antistatic sprays 
available for less than $10. With twice -weekly 
application, these may help up to a point. 
Spray the carpeting and general desk area 
near the computer, but be careful not to spray 
the computer or the printer directly, since the 
spray may seep into the inner workings of the 
machines and cause corrosion and other dam- 
age. 

If your computer starts acting "funny" by 
locking up or responding with odd letters on 
its screen, pause before hauling out the pack- 
ing boxes and sending the computer off for 
repair. Look first at the clothes you are wear- 
ing as a possible cause of the problem. Certain 
clothes in particular can build up static — fuzzy 
sweaters, for example, or, as I have found out 



Your computer's worst 
enemies: 1. Bad wiring 
and erratic power 
supply; 2. Inadequate 
ventilation: 3. Dirt, 
dust, drips, and 
crumbs: 4. Static 
electricity buildup: 5. 
Temperature extremes: 
6. Unstable or rickety 
installation; and 7, 
Theft, fire, uandallsm, 
and accidents. 



JANUARY 1986 43 



A GOOD INSTAL- 
LATION SHOULD 
BE PERMANENT 
AND STABLE. 



the hard way, unexpected items such as fur- 
lined moccasins. 

Dry days, during which your clothes cling 
to your body and your hair crackles when you 
brush It, are prime for static buildup around 
your computer. If your home's heating system 
saps the air of moisture during the winter, or 
if you live in a dry, desert-like climate, it may 
be a good idea to invest in a humidifier. A 
humidifier can control the amount of moisture 
in the air (unlike water vapor from a boiling 
kettle or a morning shower) and can prolong 
the life of your computer equipment. Be sure 
to buy one that provides moisture in vapor 
form and has an accurate humidistat for mea- 
suring the room's humidity level. Otherwise, 
you risk building up too much water vapor in 
certain areas, including the Inside of your 
computer. This can leave mineral deposits and 
cause rust. 



©^HEALTH' INSURANCE 

Preventive measures can safeguard your computer up to a point, but you'll 
need an Insurance policy to cover the rest. Standard iiome Insurance policies 
protect your computer against the basics: loss from theft, fire, or vandalism. 
They cover only the "cash value" of your system, however. The contents of 
disks (software you have bought or developed yourselO or damage resulting 
from accidents (such as your dog knocking the monitor off the table and onto 
the floor) are not part of the deal. Neither does the insurance cover computers 
used for home business. 

More complete coverage can be obtained through special extensions, called 
"endorsements," that are tacked onto the homeowner's policy either for free 
or for a small charge. Home insurance often provides "all-risk" coverage 
(including most accidents, although very few include damage through electri- 
cal surges), makes provisions for software, and reimburses for claims based 
on "replacement costs" (i.e., the amount you would have to pay for a new 
system with similar capabilities). Chances are, it will even cover the comput- 
er while it's being used for business. 

A few companies have developed policies Just for computers with much 
lower premiums than full homeowners' policies command. The policies pro- 
vide broad coverage for both hardware and software, and offer the bonus of 
insuring your equipment even when youre on the road or moving. These 
usually cover business use as well. 

Here Is a sampling of companies that ofTer special policies for both hard- 
ware and software. Rates may vary, depending on where you live and what 
type of home or apartment you own (or rent). Check with your local agent 
about endorsements or special provisions that you can add to insurance 
policies you already carry. Note what the deductible is, if any, on a policy 
before making your choice. And don't procrastinate until it's too late. 

Continental Insurance: 2 Corporate Place S., Piscataway, N.J. 08854: 
(201) 981-4224 

Endorsement to homeowners' policy. Nationwide service. All-risk coverage, 
including all hazards that occur within 100 feet of your home, excluding 
damage from static electricity, magnetic fields, and power surges- Insures 
commercial, but not user-developed software. Covers business use. Rates: S8 
addition to premium for Si, 000 of coverage; 810,000 limit; no deductible. 

Fireman's Fund: 777 San Marin Drive, Novato, CA 94998: (415) 899- 
2647 

Endorsement to homeowners' policy. Worldwide coverage. Basic coverage 
except for damage from dust, static, power surges, etc. Insures both commer- 
cial and user-developed software. Covers business use. Rates: S2 addition to 
premium for $100 of coverage; S2.000 limit: no deductible. 

Nationwide; 1 Nationwide Plaza, Columbus. OH 43216: 1614) 227-71 1 1 

Included In standard homeowners' policy. Nationwide service. All-risk cov- 
erage. Insures both commercial and user-developed software. Covers busi- 
ness use. Rales: No extra fee for coverage up to S3, 000: $8 for additional 
S2.000: S 10.000 limit: no deductible. 

Safeware, The Insurance Agency, Inc.; 2929 N. High St., Columbus, 
OH 43202: (614) 262-0559 

Special policies just for computers. Nationwide service. All-risk coverage 
except for theft from an unattended vehicle. Insures commercial, but not 
user-developed software. Covers business use. Rates: S39 for 82,000 of cover- 
age: $69 for $5,000 of coverage; 817,000 limit: S50 deductible. 

— ROXANE FARMAKFARMAIAN 



(^TEMPERATURE 

A persona! computer is exactly what the 
term suggests — personal. You can expect it to 
function well even if you like your room cold or 
hot. since its temperature tolerance covers 
much the same range as any human being's. 
The computer Is much less effective than a 
person, however, in its ability to withstand 
rapid changes In temperature. Carrying your 
equipment from a cold environment to a warm, 
moist one can lead to condensation inside the 
components. This can cause possible short cir- 
cuiting (if the computer is turned on before it's 
dry) and rust. Likewise, rapid temperature 
fluctuations can lead to equipment fatigue. 
The metal and other materials in a computer 
will react to cold or heat by quickly contracting 
or expanding, thus stressing their delicate 
electronics. 

Temperature extremes can also damage a 
computer. When choosing its roosting spot, 
take care not to place the equipment near a 
heater or in the line of direct, uninterrupted 
sunlight. Prolonged heat can sometimes cause 
warping of internal boards, and certainly won't 
do any disks much good, either. 

(6)STABILITY OF INSTALLATION 

The computer's home is not only a work- 
place, but, when the equipment is not in use. 
a storage place as well. Though hardy ma- 
chines, computers do not appreciate being fre- 
quently disassembled and moved around. An 
appropriate installation, therefore, should be 
designed to be permanent and stable. Moving 
your computer too often can lead to unneces- 
sary jarring and bumping, which might cause, 
among other horrors. Internal breakage, hair- 
line cracks in the body or plug-In boards, or 
damage to the finely tuned disk-drive head. 

Don't try to make the computer share 
space with another electrical appliance (such 
as a sewing machine) that will require a lot of 
plugging in and unplugging. This wears out 
the computer's cable connectors and increases 
the risk of twisting or breaking important 
wires. Hooking up the computer near a tele- 
phone or stereo can be perilous as well If your 
computer does not have adequate shielding 
{check your manual). The telephone's ringing 
causes coils in the receiver to give off a small 
magnetic field that might wipe out data 
from your disks. Stereo speakers have coils 
that act similarly. 

Finally, consider the human traffic around 
your computer (even when it's not in use] and 
arrange to squirrel away all cords, rather than 
leaving them dangling or lying underfoot. 

By planning these basics right into your 
setup, you can prevent untimely physical 
breakdown on the computer's part and dis- 
tress on your own. These suggestions are the 
stitches in time that will save you money and 
heartache in the long run. Your computer is a 
precious investment — worth coddling a bit to 
ensure it a long, healthy life. H 



44 FAMILY COMPUTING 



JMjWJilUJMJ 




EDITED 

BY ROXANE 

FARMANFARMAIAN 



Customizing your system so it fits your family's porticular needs ond 
habits is one of the great pleasures of computer ownership. Organizing 
your workstation to maximize the space at your disposal and devising 
ways to protect and streamline your system — these are but sonne of 
the improvements you can make to your sysJem fo give it a personal 
touch. Here is a handful of helpful hints to get you started — the rest is 
up to you. 

Reminder: Turn off your computer and peripherals before tinkering 
with them. Parental guidance is recommended for young children un- 
dertaking these activities. 



Up 

and Away With 

Those Cords. 

Do you find that your cables and 
cords are always underfoot, and that 
your joysticks and touch tablets are 
constantly hanging precariously off 
of the table? A great way to keep 
track of all these "stringy" goodies is 
to drape them over hooks on the 
wall near your computer. An inex- 
pensive plastic coatrack with one, 
three, or five pegs is ideal. Place the 
cords that never get changed on one 
side, and the joysticks, tablets, and 
other "moveables" on the other. 



Pamper Your Disk Drive 
with Cool, Clean Air. 

If you leave your disk drive on for ex- 
tended periods of time, or if there is 
a lot of smoke or dust around your 
computer, use this tip to keep your 
system clean, cool, and healthy. 

Place an inexpensive air purifier 
upside down over the air vents on 
the top rear of the drive. This wlU re- 
duce the temperature of the chips 
inside and filter out much of the 
dust and smoke particles that enter 
the drive through the air. I chose 
the Norelco Model HB0999 because 
it Is compact and very Inexpensive, 
although other lightweight purifiers 
will also do the Job. 

Make sure when using a purifier 
to remove all of the filters made of 
charcoal, citrus, or other filtering 
agents. Take particular care to re- 
move any loose material that may 
fall into the drive and cause damage. 
I left only the coarse wire-mesh fil- 
ter, to increase airflow. Airflow can 
be further enhanced by sealing the 
unit with a foam gasket placed be- 
tween the purifier and the drive. 

The appearance of the upside- 
down purifier can be improved by re- 
moving the legs. 

SCOTT STEFANtDES 

Swoyersville, Pennsylvania 



Convert a 
Plastic Storage Bin 
Into a Neat and 
Pretty Printer Stand. 

Is your printer paper wedged incon- 
veniently between your printer and 
the wall? Does changing your paper 
take unusual patience and skill? Try 
making this inexpensive, front-load- 
ing printer stand. It's compact, at- 
tractive, and available in five differ- 
ent colors. The front-loading feature 
makes it a breeze to switch back and 
forth between fanfold paper and 
single sheets, and even mailing labels. 





B 


?? 1 


SHIP 


^ 





You will need a "StorageMate" or 
other modular plastic storage bin 
that measures 7Vi6 x 14 x Q'A 
inches (available at Sears and other 
houseware stores for approximately 
S4 ). Using a heavy knife or fine- 
toothed saw, cut out the back-side 
webbing of the bin. 




Turn the "ex-storage bin" upside 
down and a printer stand will ap- 
pear before your eyes. Depending on 
your printer, you may find that by 
cutting notches in the bottom webs 
you'll be able to "lock" your printer 
into place on the stand. 




Feed your paper through the hole In 
the back and change it with ease 
from the front. 

LESLIE PHIPPS 

Gary, North Carolina 



increase Your 
Computer's Range 
by Putting it on 
Wheels. 

If the place where your family finally 
agreed to set up the computer was a 
compromise solution, try putting 
your computer on wheels. A used 
typewriter trolley with a second shelf 
can contain the whole system; key- 
board and monitor on top, disk 
drives and printer (if you have one) 
on the bottom. Make sure the stand 
Is stable. Place a thick foam type- 



writer pad or antistatic mat under 
each element of the system — com- 
puter, disk drive, etc. — to absorb 
any bumps or vibrations on the way 
from one room to another. Don't try 
to carry the trolley up or down 
stairs. If you are hooking the com- 
puter into different televisions or 
monitors, try attaching permanent 
computer switch boxes to each set to 
make the move faster, and to cause 
less wear and tear on your plugs. 

JAMES FOOHEY 

Los Angeles, Califomia 



JANUARY 1986 45 




The Apple 

Personal 

Modem 



Commodore 
1660 



EVERYTHING YOU ALWAYS WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT 
HOOKING YOUR COMPUTER TO THE PHONE LINES 

People often have a lot of trouble with printers, and un- 
derstandably so. A printer has to work with your comput- 
er and the software you use. Getting the three elements 
to work together is no picnic. 

The same is true of computer communications with a 
modem. The modem needs to be compatible with your 
computer and communications software. On top of that, 
your system has to mesh with the system you're calling! 
Things can and do go wrong. 

Even getting started can be an adventure. Where do 
you go for help? Computer salespeople aren't necessarily 
experts in communications. They want to sell what they 
have in stock and pick up their lingo from the user 
manuals (which are not written by the E.B. Whites of the 
world). Confusion supreme! 

It would be nice to report that there's an easy way 
around this. There's not, really, except to get started. 
You'll find that it's not that hard. All modems work, and 
most work pretty well. Usually, it's easier to get a modem 
than a printer to work with your system. And since many 
modems are sold with software, you may not have to run 
around trying to get a match. 

The following questions and answers address the fun- 
damental issues concerning modems and communica- 
tions. The chart lists basic features of modems. While 
more can be said about modems, we feel the less said, the 
better. Learn by doing! 



NICK SULLIVAN IS Senior editor at family computing. 



[| MODEMS 

Q. What's a modem? 

A. A modem is a device that allows you to connect your 
computer to the phone lines. On the sending end, a 
modem converts computer signals to phone signals; on 
the receiving end, a modem converts phone signals back 
to computer signals. 

Q. What can I do with a modem? 

A. A modem allows you to make a telephone call from 
your computer to otlier computers and transfer informa- 
tion back and forth. You can exchange files and programs 
with a friend down the street; Join a Special Interest 
Group on an information service such as CompuServe or 
The Source; do high-level research on a specialized data 
base such as Dialog or NewsNet: pay your bills through a 
home-banking service, such as those run by Citibank or 
Bank of America; gel stock quotes from Dow Jones News/ 
Retrieval; send and receive electronic mail via MCI Mail or 
Western Union's EasyLinkr or shop through a videotext 
service such as Viewtron. Many services include "start-up 
kits ■ or trial offers in modem boxes. 

Q. Do I need software to use a modem? 

A. Yes, for all practical purposes. You need communica- 
tions software, which is sometimes called "terminal soft- 



46 FAMILY COMPUTING 



ware." This sends the characters you type through the 
modem to the computer on the other end and displays on 
the screen what the other computer sends you. Most 
communications software also allows you to give com- 
mands to the modem — such as what number to dial — 
and to send and receive files as a unit and automatically 
save them to disk. In some ways, communications soft- 
ware is similar to the print-formatting functions in word- 
processing software that allow you to send commands to 
your printer. A few modems have software built in, and 
many others are sold with software on disk {see chart). 

Q. Will modems work with all phones? 

A. In general, yes, but there are exceptions. Most mo- 
dems will make calls on both tone and rotary (pulse) 
phone systems, though some are designed specifically for 
one or the other. If you have a call-waiting function on 
your phone, the modem will make calls but get knocked 
off the line every time someone calls you. The only modem 
we know of that Isn't disturbed by call-waiting is the 
AT&T Model 4000. 

Also, most modems are designed to be used with modu- 
lar phone jacks, the type that you can easily plug into or 
take out of your phone. With these modems, you just take 
the jack from your phone and plug it into the modem. 

Q. What if my phone doesn't have modular jacks? 

A. If you have an old-fashioned "hard-wired" phone, you 
need a modem with an "acoustic coupler, " which is a set 
of cups into which you place your phone [see photo of 
GE 3-S200). They arc needed in most hotel rooms and in 
pay phone booths, which use hard-wired phones. Unless 
you need them for your phone, acoustic couplers aren't 
recommended because they aren't as reliable as standard 
modems. Some "designer" phone headsets won't fit se- 
curely into an acoustic coupler. 

Q. How do I connect a modem to my computer? 

A. There are two basic types of modems — internal and 
external. Internal modems are sold for computers such as 
the Apple lie and IBM PC, which have internal slots for 
circuit boards. But all computers can use external mo- 
dems, usually connected to the serial port. 

As noted in the chart, many modems have an RS-232C 
interface. On computers with standard RS-232C serial 
ports, a standard 25-pin serial cable will make the con- 
nection. On computers with nonstandard interfaces 
(such as Atari 800XL, Commodore 64/128, Apple lie, and 
Macintosh) special cables are required. These should be 
sold with the modem. Make sure you know where to get a 
cable before you buy a modem. 

Another kind of external modem that is less common is 
the plug-in modem. It doesn't require cables and merely 
plugs into the back of a computer. You can find such a 
modem for the Commodore 64/128 . 

If you're worried about making the right connection, 
the conservative approach is to buy a modem made by the 
manufacturer of your computer (Apple. Atari. Commo- 
dore, IBM, Tandy, etc.). Then you can be sure it will work 
with your computer. 

Q. What's the difference between 300-baud, 1200-baud, 
and 2400-baud modems? 

A. The baud rate of a modem indicates how fast it will 
send and receive data. A 300-baud modem will send a 
little more than one double-spaced page per minute. A 
1200-baud modem is four times faster and will send more 
than four pages per minute. 

The newest kind of modem operates at 2400 baud. 
These are considerably more expensive and can be cost- 



justified only for people who operate businesses depend- 
ent on computer communications, 

Q. If I have a 300-baud modem, can I communicate with 
a 1200-baud modem? 

A. Yes, but at 300 baud, not 1200 baud. In any connec- 
tion, both modems must operate at the same speed. Your 
300-baud modem can't operate at 1200 baud, but the 
1200-baud modem can operate at 300 baud. 

Q. How much do modems cost? 

A. You can find 300-baud modems for SI 00 to $200, 
though some cost less than $100: 1200-baud modems 
range in price from about $200 to S600; and 2400-baud 
modems go from S500 to S900. As with other products, 
you may get a better deal through a mail-order house if 
you know what you want beforehand. When pricing mo- 
dems, always factor in the cost of a computer-to-modem 
cable and software, unless they are Included. 

Q. What charges will I incur using a modem? 

A. The phone company treats a computer call as it does 
a voice call. You pay the same rates. Thus, it pays to make 
local calls when possible. Beyond that, most Information 
services charge for usage by the minute: often they 
charge more for 1200-baud usage than 300-baud. 

Fortunately, major Information services have hundreds 
of access numbers across the country, so people In large 
cities pay only for a local call plus the service's rates. If 
there are no access numbers In your area, you'll either 
have to call long distance or go through Tymnet or Te- 
lenet. These are continent-wide communication net- 
works devoted exclusively to computer communication. 
They charge $ 1 per hour during business hours and $2 
per hour nights and weekends. 

Q. What does "Hayes-compatible" mean? 

A. Much as IBM has become the dominant standard for 
business computers and software, Hayes has become the 
standard for 300- and 1200-baud modems. Most manu- 
facturers make modems functionally similar to Hayes mo- 
dems. That is, the command that causes Hayes modems 
to dial a number or to change baud rate has the same 
effect on a Hayes-compatible modem. Furthermore, most 
communications software is written to work with Hayes 
modems, which means It will also work with Hayes-com- 
patible modems. 

Q, What features should I look for in a modem? 

A. First, if you can afford one. a 1200-baud modem 
makes sense. It will cost more than a 300-baud modem, 
though over time you will probably recoup the cost in 
reduced phone charges, especially if you plan to do any- 
thing more than chat online. Second. Hayes compatibil- 
ity is a good feature that will probably make your life 
easier. Beyond that, an auto-dial feature is handy. With 
the right software, auto-dial modems allow you to store 
phone numbers in memory and then dial them from the 
keyboard by pushing one key. 

Auto-answer capability is not as important for most 
people but gives you additional options. With the right 
software, an auto-answer modem will answer an incom- 
ing call by itself. Some communications programs even 
have a "remote" mode so that you or other callers can 
leave information in or retrieve it from your computer. 

Q« Why do some modems have lights on the front while 
others are plain? 

A. Lights don't affect the way a modem operates: they 
just keep you informed as to what's happening (dialing. 



JANUARY 1985 47 





■ -- 1 - L - r^^B 


12C 


La 




2400-BAUD MODEMS 




^^^ 


Model 


Price 


liKloded 


Iniemaiy 
ExIenMl 


Hayef 
Cempcrtibre 


Fefltures 


Canpufer & lirierface 


K 
















Anchor 
Automation 


Volksmodem 


S79 


— 


E 


NA" 


Aux. phone jack 


Cables for many computers. 
SI 2.95 ea. 


Apple Computer 


Modem 300 


S225 


Apple Term-' 


E 


No 




All Apple computers (no 
software with Mac), cable 
Included 


Atari 


XM301 


S49 


XETerm 


E 


No 


LED« 


Atarl'^ 


CDl 


Mitey Mo 


S99 


Smart 64 
Terminal +4 


E^ 


No"* 


Aux. phone Jack 


C 64/128. cable Included 


Coleco 


AdamLink 


$99 


AdamL\nk' 


I 


No 


— 


Adam 


Commodore 


1660/Modem 300 


Si29 


Common Sense 


E''' 


No" 


Speaker 


Commodore" 


E + E DalaComm 


Avatex 300 


S64 


— 


E 


Yes 


Aux. phone ]ack 


RS-232C 


General Electric 


3-8200 


SI 19 


— 


E 


No 


Acoustic coupler & direct 
connect, LED''' 


RS-232C. Atari''' 


Hayes 


Smartmodem SOCfi 


S199 


— 


E 


Yes 


LED", speaker 


RS-232C 


Mlcromodem He 


S199 


Smartcom 


1 


Yes 


Speaker 


Apple 11 series" 


Mtcroperlpheral 


Autoprint 
Mlcroconnectlon 


S69 


Yes 


E 


No 


Aux. phone Jack, LED" 


Atari and Commodore " . 
Centronics parallel 


Novation 


The Cat 


S1S9 


— 


E 


NA" 


Acoustic coupler, LED*' 


1^S-232C 


Tandy 


AC-4 


$119 


— 


E 


NA'I " 


Acoustic coupler 


liS-232C 


DCM3 


$59 


— 


E 


No 


— 


RS-232C 


Trans Com 


TCM-1 


8109 
SI99 


Yes 


E" 
E 


No' 
Yes 


Aux. phone jack. LED'' 


C 64/128 


U.S. Robotics 


Password 300 


Speaker 


RS-232C 


ZOOM 
Telephonies 


ZOOM/MODEM He 


S!79 


ZOOM Communi- 
cations 


1 


Yes 


Speaker 


Apple 11 series'' 


Anchor 
Automation 


Volksmodem 12 


S299 


— 


E 


Yes 


— 


RS-232C, cables lor nianv 
computers— SI 2.95 ea. 


Apple Computer 


The Apple 
Personal Modem 


S399 


— 


E 


Yes 


LED", speaker 


All Apple computers, cables 
$29 ea. 


AT&T 


Model 4000 


S499 


SoJtCall ($79)' 


E 


Yes 


Aux. phone jack, LED", 
speaker 


RS-232C 


Cermelek 


Appie-MATE 1200 
1200LC 


S299 


Built In 


I 


Yes 


Speaker 


Apple II series'-* 


$199 


— 


E 


Yes 


Aux. phonejack. LED", 
speaker 


RS-232C 


I200TPC 


S149 


QC-Modem 


I 


Yes 


Speaker 


IBM PC 


Commodore 


1670/Modem 1200 


$199 


Commorj Sense 


E^ 


Yes 


Speaker 


Commodore" 


E + E DataComm 


Avatex 1200 


S199 


— 


E 


Yes 


Aux. phonejack. LED" 


RS-232C 


General 
DataComm 


Acculine 1200 


S499 


— 


E 


Yes 


Aux. phonejack, LED". 
speaker 


RS-232C 


Hayes 


Smartmodem 1200 


S599 


— 


E 


Yes 


LED", speaker 


RS-232C 


Smartmodem 
1200B 


S549 


Smarlcom // 
2.0 


1 


Yes 


Aux, phonejack 


IBM PC 


Mlcrocom 


MacModem 


$699 


MacModem 


E 


No 


— 


Macintosh 


ERA 2 1200 
ZX 1200 


S499 
S699 


ERA 2 


I 


No 


Aux. phone lack, speaker 


IBM PC/PCrr. Apple 11 series^ 


— 


E 


Yes 


LED", speaker 


RS-232C 


Novation 


Apple-Cat 212 


S3 19 


ComWare il 


! 


No 


Aux. phone jack 


Apple tl series" 


Smart Cat Plus 


S499 


Mite' 


E 


Yes 


Aux. phonejack. LED", 
speaker 


RS-232C 


Prentice 


POPCOMC150 


S465 


PFS: Access 


I 


Yes 


Aux. phone Jack, speaker 


IBM PC 


Prometheus 


ProModem 1200 


S495 


— 


E 


Yes 


LED^, speaker 


RS.232C 




S449 
$399 


Built In 


I 


Yes 


— . 


Apple 11 series" 




ProModem 1200B 


Mfle 


I 


Yes 


Speaker 


IBM PC 


PrxjModem 1200M 


$549 


PmCom-M 


E 


Yes 


LED", speaker 


Macintosh, cable Included 


Racal-Vadlc 


Maxwell 1200V 


S295 


CommuniKU (S791''' E 


Yes 


— 


RS-232C 


Maxwell I200PC 


S295 


George 2.0' 


1 


Yes 


— 


IBM PC 


Tandy 


PC Modem 1200 


S299 


— 


1 


Yes 


Aux. phonejack 


Tandy 1000/1 200HD, IBM PC 


DC-2212 


S399 


— 


E 


No 


— 


RS.232C 


Trans Com 


TCM-1 200 


S225 


TmnsTenn 


E 


No' 


Aux. phonejack, LED", 
speaker 


C 64/128 


Transend 


PC ModemCard 


S241 


— 


I 


Yes 


Aux. phonejack, speaker 


IBM PC 


InfoPhone 1200 


S385 


— 


E 


Yes 


Same as above 


RS-232C 


U.S. Robotics 


Password 1200 


S499 


— 


E 


Yes 


_ 


RS-232C 


ZOOM 
TtlephrjnU-s 


ZOOMfltlODEM 

PCI 300 


S499 


ZOOM/DISK. 

I'FS: Access 


1 


Yes 


— 


IBM PC 


t. 1 


Anchor 
Automation 


Signalman 
Lightning 24 


$599 


— 


E 


Yes 


Aux. phone jack, LED", 
speaker 


RS-232C 


Cermetek 


2400 Modem 


S745 


— 


E 


Yes 


Same as above 


RS-232C 


Hayes 


Smartmodem 
2400 


S899 


— 


E 


Yes 


Same as above 


RS.232C 


Mlcrocom 


MacModem 2400 


S999 


MacModem 


E 


No 


Same as above 


Macintosh, cable Included 


Multi-Tech 


MultlModem224 


S795 


— 


E 


Yes 


Same as above 


RS-232C 


Novation 


Professional 2400 


$795 


— 


E 


Yes 


Aux. phonejack, LCD'", 
speaker 


RS-232C 


Racal-Vadlc 


Maxwell 2400V 


$595 


CommunlKit 
(S79)'^ 


E 


Yes 


Aux. phonejack, LED". 
speaker 


RS-232C 


U.S. Robotics 


Courier 2400 


$895 


— 


E 


Yes 


Same as above 


RS-232C 


t. IBM PC, Kaypro. and Macintosh versions available. 3. Cartridge. 3. Software doesn't transfer lilcs. 4. Commodore 1650-compaIlblc. »♦ Apple lie version 1S239) Includes lie 
cable and Smartcom J. 4. LIghl-EmltUng Diodes (display lights). T. Software works with IBM PC and compatibles, a. Commodore Includes C 64/128/16. VIC-20. Plus/4. •. Not 
Including the lie. Ift. Liquid Crystal Display— modem status In English- II. Not applicable to manual-dial modems. 1i. Atari Includes Atari 130XE. 400. 600XL. 800. and 
BOOXL. IS. IBM PC or Macintosh kit Includes cable and eommunicalions software. 14. Versions available: Atari 400, 600XL. 800. 800XL: C 64/128.- and VIC 20. 



48 PAMILY COMPUTING 



sending data, receiving data. etc.). Because computer 
communications can sometimes be confusing, lights are 
reassuring. Some modems have speakers, which also al- 
low you to "follow" your call — you can hear It dial, etc. 

Q. Can I keep both my phone and my modem connected 
to the same outside line at the same time? 

A. Yes, but you will need two phone plugs on your mo- 
dem — one for a line from your telephone and one for a 
line to the jack on the wall. Not all modems have two 
jacks. (Those that do mention an auxiliary phone jack 
under "Features" in the chart.) If yours doesn't, you can 
add an Inexpensive "Y" adapter with two jacks. And, of 
course, if your computer is using your phone line, you 
can't talk over the line at the same time, but on some 
modems you can switch easily from one to the other. 

Q. What's a "voice-data switch"? 

A. On many manual-dial modems, you dial your tele- 
phone with the switch on VOICE. When you hear a high- 
pitched computer tone at the other end, you (lick to 
DATA, which completes the connection. Also, if you and a 
friend both have modems connected, a voice-data switch 
allows you to talk by voice, then switch to computer 
communications by flicking the switch to DATA. 

Q. With all these passible features to consider, how do I 
go about choosing a modem for my computer? 

A. Don't worry about the features until you get your 
basic needs sorted out. Figure out what speed you want 
and what modems will work with your computer. Then 
shop on price and see how many features you can afford. 
Some modems come with software, which is a plus; 
others come with cables, another plus. You can also find 
internal or external modems, modems with a speaker or 
without, modems with one jack or two, modems with 
front-panel LED lights, etc. 

w\ COMMUNICATIONS SOFTWARE 

O. How important is communications software? 

A. Software is key. Anything you want to do must be 
done through software. Thus, if you want to operate at 
1200 baud, your modem and software must both have 
that capability. If you want to store numbers and auto- 
matically dial them from the keyboard, both your modem 
and your software must include this feature. And so on. 

Q. Can all communications software transfer files to and 
from my disk drive? 

A. No. The ability to send and receive files is a feature 
often lacking in communications software. A lot of soft- 
ware will allow you to call and connect with another 
computer and type and read messages, but not send a 
disk file over the line or save what you are receiving to 
disk. Look for "file-transfer" capability, which will let you 
send a file from disk. 

Q. What's a "capture buffer" and how Is it used? 

A. In a communications sense, a buffer is a part of your 
computer's memory that is free to receive data when 
you're online. Say you're on Dow Jones/News Retrieval 
reading stock quotes. When you see something especially 
interesting, you might "open" your buffer so that every- 
thing you read goes into the computer's memory. When 
you've read all you want, you "close" the buffer. Depend- 
ing on the software you are using, you may then be able 
to call up the buffer's contents onto your screen, edit it, 
print it out, and/or save it to disk. 

Q. What's a "protocol"? 



A. An error-checking protocol is a set of rules, used for 
automatic transfer of files, which is built into some com- 
munications software. These rules help the communicat- 
ing computers to catch and correct errors caused by 
phone-line problems. For this to work, both computers 
must be using the same protocol. The most common 
ones are XMODEM (which has several versions} and 
CompuServe's "B " protocol. 

You probably don't have to worry about protocols unless 
it's especially important that every character of the file is 
transferred correctly, such as when you're sending or 
receiving a machine-language program. 

Q. Can I print when I'm online? 

A. Sometimes yes, sometimes no — it depends on your 
software. Look for software that lets you print out every- 
thing you read on the screen as it comes over the phone 
line (if your printer is connected and turned on). 

This "print-out" feature is particularly useful when 
reading electronic mail or browsing through an informa- 
tion service. In these cases, it's preferable to "dump" on- 
screen data to the printer, rather than saving to disk and 
printing from there. 

O. Can I use my modem to send a letter I've written with 
my word-processing program? 

A. Yes, if your word processor stores the files on disk in 
ASCII format. (ASCII, the American Standard Code for 
Information Interchange, is the code most micros use 
internally to represent text.) If your communications soft- 
ware can transfer files, it will want files stored in ASCII 
format. Not all word-processing programs can store files 
in this fashion. 

Sending non-ASCII files directly to someone who has 
the same word-processing program is possible, but gen- 
erally not worth the trouble. 

^J THE FUTURE 

Q. What does the future hold for computer communica- 
tions via phone lines? 

A. • Higher speed and greater accuracy. Just around 
the corner are 9600-baud modems that can work over 
ordinary phone lines. 

• Greater integration of computer emd voice communi- 
cations. Already some systems will "read" your electronic 
mail to you using a computer-synthesized voice, and 
complex electronic answering systems can organize both 
voice recordings and electronic-mail messages and deliver 
them in any form. 

• Control of your computer — and your home — from 
any phone anywhere. You call home, your computer an- 
swers the phone, and, by pushing buttons on the phone, 
you can tell the computer to start the meat roasting or to 
wake up Molly in half an hour — or to call you if there are 
any important messages. 



MANUFACTURERS 

ANCHOR AUTOMATION (818) 997-7758: APPLE COMPUTER 
(800) 538-9696; AT&T (201) 898-6000; CDI (415) 633-1899; CER- 
METEK MICROELECTRONICS (408) 752-5000: COLECO INDUS- 
TRIES (800) 842-1225: COMMODORE BUSINESS MACHINES 
(215) 431-9100: E + E DATACOMM (408) 263-1833: GENEfiAL 
DATACOMM (203) 574-1118; GENERAL ELECTRIC CONSUMER 
ELECTRONICS (315) 456-0123; HAYES MICROCOMPUTER 
PRODUCTS. INC. (4041 449-8791; MICROCOM INC. (617) 762- 
9310; MICROPERIPHERAL CORP. (206) 881-7544; MUUTi-TECH 
SYSTEMS. INC. (612) 631-3550; NOVATION INC. (800) 423-5419; 
PANASONIC (201) 348-7000; PRENTICE CORP. (408) 734-9810: 
PROMETHEUS PRODUCTS (415) 490-2370: RACAL-VADIC (408) 
946-2227; TANDY (817) 338-2393: TRANS COM (312) 543-9055: 
TRANSEND CORP. (408) 946-7400; U.S. ROBOTICS (800) 342- 
5877; ZOOM TELEPHONICS (800) 631-31 16. m 



JANUARY 1986 49 



BY HENRY F. BEECHHOLD 

The neck bone's connected to the 
head bone . . . 

— ^Anon, (traditional song) 

Having done a bit of tinkering, 
snooping about, and computer 
housecleanlng [see last month's 
"Hands On: Clean Your Computer 
and Look Around Inside"\, you're 
ready to step beyond the narrow 
confines of the ho-hum basic com- 
puter system. I mean, there's just no 
joy In facing the future with nothing 
but a computer, video display, and a 
lonesome disk drive. 

GEniNG INTO INTERFACES 

Any component you add to your 
system must be interfaced in some 
way. For certain items, interfacing is 
simply a matter of shoving a plug \ 
into a socket. For others, it's not 
quite so simple. 

For now, though, let's examine 
plugs and sockets. Here are some of 
the common "mating connectors" 
you'll meet in your computer travels: 



FROM CPU TO SUPERSYSTEAA— 
DO-IT-YOURSELF ENHANCEMENTS 



(Part Three of a Six>Part Series) 




Mulfipfn connecters— «se<i lo mete cobles 
directty with components en circuit boards. 





DOMor "Sevfsrfte Indtttrle Womr" or "Cermaa 
Mvstry Standard." Examples: Commodore 64 
serial port, video monitor, and power 
connections. 




CentreniH— named for the company Ibcrt 
developed l{iis kinci of interface. I sample: 
nearly ony printer claiming to be "Cenlroniu- 
cempoftble." 

HENRY F. BEECHHOLD, pro/essor of English 
and chairman of the Interdisciplinary 
Linguistics Program at Trenton State 
College, is a computer tinkerer and do- 
U-ijourselJ-er par excellence. He is the 
author of The Plain Engllsii I?cpalr and 
Maintenance Guide for liome Computers, 
and Tlie Plain Englisti Maintenance and 
Repair Guide for IBM Personal 
Computers (Simon & Schuster. 1 984/85). 



Cord^edge connectors— typically found in game- 
cartridge interfaces, They connect (and 
physically grasp) iBtenwl circuit cards. 




OB-OB sabmlniature connectort— "nn" indicates 
Hi« number of pins in the connector. Thus, DB.9 
(commonly used at a joystick connector) has 
nine pins; BB-IS (the informal standard for 
Mrial lirteifatlngi has 35 pint. 




Modular connecter*— or lfi« telephone 
company's two cents' worth. Modular 
Interfacing is required between a "dirett- 
connect" modem and the telephone line. 
Modular connectors ore also sometimes used for 
hooking up keyboards and light pens. 




RCA connectors— used to connect lines from your 
computer to video and audio inputs on your 
monitor, your stereo, or on an BF modulcrter 
connected to your TV. 



INTERFACING INS AND OUTS 

The purpose of an interface is to 
establish a connection between a 
computer and a peripheral so that 
electronic circuitry (hardware) and 
device-driver programs (software) 
can manage communication be- 
tween the "host" (the computer) and 
the "guest" (the peripheral). 

This communication takes place 
through an I/O (input/output) facility 
called a "port." Externally, I/O ports 
look like connectors. Inside your 
computer, each physical port corre- 
sponds to a numbered location, and 
all communication between the com- 
puter and the peripheral involves 
writing data to, and reading it from, 
this location. Part of the purpose of 
a driver program is to make sure the 
correct port is open and ready to do 
business with the peripheral you've 
added. In some cases, the peripheral 
itself must be set, via switches, to 
match the port location — otherwise, 
problems can arise. For example, if 
you've switched your Commodore 
printer to act as device 5. while your 
computer still thinks it's device 4, 
the computer and the printer aren't 
going to get along at all. This prob- 
lem can be fixed most easily by re- 
configuring the printer to act as de- 
vice 4, by resetting its DIP switches 
according to simple instructions in 
the manual. (Alternatively, if whatev- 
er software you are using offers you 
the option, you can temporarily re- 
configure it to send printer output 
to device 5.) 

This business of ports, addresses, 
and device numbers isn't meant to 
scare you. It simply means there's 
sometimes more to interfacing than 
meets the eye. In fact, matching up 
plugs and sockets is only part of the 
interfacing story — in many cases, be- 
fore you can use a peripheral, you'll 



50 FAMILY COMPUTING 



have to configure it (and/or your 
computer) in certain ways. However, 
though problems like these can be 
frustrating, they're usually pretty 
easy to solve. And they reflect the 
considerable flexibility that exists in 
setting up a complete computer sys- 
tem — provided you know what your 
options are in preventing conflicts 
and discrepancies between compo- 
nents. This kind of knowledge is 
gained by reading manuals closely 
and by — need I say it? — cautious ex- 
perimentation. 

PRACTICAL INTERFACING 

Broadly speaking, there are two 
patterns of data communication: 
parallel and serial. The Ins and outs 
of these patterns will be the topic of 
the next "Hands On." For now, let's 
look at some typical interfacing situ- 
ations you may encounter as you ex- 
pand your computer system. 

There's hardly any challenge to ex- 
panding your system with peripher- 
als from your computer's original 
manufacturer. Hooking up such 
"first-party" peripherals is usually 
just a matter of plugging in and 
turning on. Unfortunately, first-par- 
ty peripherals are often more expen- 
sive than "better," third-party equip- 
ment. Moreover, the variety and 
capabilities of peripherals produced 
by a computer manufacturer tend to 
be limited by the manufacturer's 
preconceived notion about what's 
"appropriate" for its computer. 
Thus, Commodore doesn't make a 
5- megabyte hard disk for the C 64. 

You can bet, however, that some- 
one else does. For those of you who 
feel you'll get into trouble adding 
third-party equipment to your (up to 
now) pristine PCs, rest easy. Al- 
though the computer manufacturer 
may want you to believe that dire 
consequences will result if you at- 
tempt to attach "alien" peripherals, 
In most cases, a company that offers 
an alien disk drive, or printer, or 
something-or-other has worked out 
the mysteries and you won't have 
any special difficulties. But because 
there's always a chance for "Mur- 
phy's Law" to operate, try before you 
buy, whenever feasible. Or, at mini- 
mum, get the seller's assurance in 
writing that satisfaction will be 
guaranteed. 

THE CHALLENGE OF 
CONFIGURATION 

When you add expansion boards 
(for memory, enhanced graphics, ad- 
ditional disk drives, and the like), be 
aware that the plugging-in part is 
usually easy. Where you may run 
into a modicum of difficulty is: 1. in 
setting the various switches correct- 



ly, and 2. in incorporating special 
software or reconfiguring existing 
software to take advantage of the 
new equipment. Pick the dealer's 
brains, or. better, make him work 
for his sale! 

Consider this: You want to install 
an internal modem in your Apple He. 
The unit will require one of the sev- 
eral card slots the He provides for 
adding internal devices. Must it be 
placed in a particular slot? If so, is 
that slot free In your machine? As- 
suming the modem card doesn't 
come with terminal software (though 
many do), will your current terminal 
program support the new card in 
the slot in which you intend to put 
it? Think about all these things be- 
fore you buy, or be prepared for dis- 
appointment! 




Assuming you (and your dealer) 
have worked out a reasonable strate- 
gy for installation, putting in the 
modem card should be fairly easy. 
When you unpack the card, you'll 
notice that there are two modular 
"female" connectors attached to it. 
One of these connectors will likely be 
marked "line," indicating that it will 
ultimately be attached (via a modu- 
lar cable with a "male" plug at each 
end) to the wall jack your telephone's 
hooked up to. The other will proba- 
bly be marked "phone." Another 
modular cable will be needed to hook 
up this connector to your telephone 
unit (the extra cable will probably 
come with the modem). 

Attached to the modem board may 
also be a short cable with a switch 
on it. This switch is designed to run 
out of the back of your Apple's enclo- 
sure, and will probably have pres- 
sure-sensitive adhesive backing so 
that you can stick it on the side of 
the computer within easy reach. The 
switch is used for setting the "du- 
plex " of the modem at half or full. 

To hook up the modem card [see 
illustration), first turn the Apple off 
and remove the power cord from Its 
receptacle in the rear. Then remove 
any monitors, disk drives, etc., you 
may have placed atop the Apple. Re- 



move the top of the Apple's enclo- 
sure. The card slots lie in a row 
along the rear of the motherboard. 
Find the proper slot on the mother- 
board according to the modem docu- 
mentation. Holding the modem card 
by its edges, carefully line up its 
"male" card-edge connector against 
the card slot and press down. You 
may have to jiggle the modem card a 
little to seat it in place, but don't 
force things. 

When the modem card's in place, 
check the rear panel of the He imme- 
diately behind it. There will be a 
pass-through aperture (for cables) 
there, covered with a piece of plastic. 
Using a flat screwdriver, carefully 
pry off this plastic cover. Pass the 
modem's duplex switch back 
through the aperture and attach it 
to the side of the box. Then run 
your modular cables in through the 
aperture from the rear and plug 
them into the appropriate "female" 
receptacles on the modem card. Lift 
your telephone receiver and listen — 
if you get a dial tone, all's well so far. 

Don't replace the top of the Apple 
yet, though. You'll probably need ac- 
cess to the modem card's DIP 
switches for configuration. Part of 
the process of setting the card's 
switches may relate to the terminal 
software you're going to use. Anoth- 
er switch or switches may have to be 
set, depending upon which slot 
you've placed the modem in. This 
should present no problem, assum- 
ing you've done your homework and 
everything works as expected. 

Unless your terminal software is 
configured ahead of time to work 
with this particular modem card In 
the slot you've chosen, there's one 
more step before you're finished. Re- 
place the Apple's top, plug in the 
computer again, and boot your ter- 
minal program. Go to the "configu- 
ration menu" and perform the nec- 
essary steps to designate the type of 
modem you're using and its card 
slot. Again, assuming you've done 
your homework, this should be a 
cinch. 

KEEP ON JAZZING 

The moral of the story is that your 
computer system can be jazzed up in 
lots of ways and that you're capable 
of doing most of the jazzing up! You 
certainly should not be afraid to try. 
Just don't overreach yourself, and 
don't be shy about asking for help — 
from dealers, manufacturers, and 
others — before you lay your money 
on the line. 

Revealed next time: RS-232, lEEE- 
488, Centronics, baud rates, hand- 
shaking, parity, and other arcana of 
communication in the system. SI 



JANUARY 1986 51 



i^ 



M. il 



N 



C I H 



:^U.]}\'WA}\}\\f 




^ 




128K APPLE lie 

with color monitor and stand; 
retails for SI, 249. 



SECOND PRIZE 



51 2K ATARI 520ST 

computer, RGB monitor, and 

360K disk drive; retails for 

S999. 



mr 



GRAND PRIZE fl 




256K 

TANDY 

1000 



with a CM4 RGB monitor, 

two disk drives, and DeskMate 

integrated software; retails for 

$1,650. 



HAYES SAAART 
MODEM 1200 

with Smartcom II 

telecommunications software; 

retails for S748. 



FOURTH PRIZ 



14-INCH THOMPSON 
RGB MONITOR 

(Apple/IBM); retaUs for $499. 




$250 

WORTH OF SOFTWARE 

from the following companies: 
Activision; Avalon Hill; Bantam 
Software; Batteries Included; Bet- 
ter Working Software; CBS Soft- 
ware; Davidson & Associates, 
Inc.; Electronic Arts: Epyx; Fish- 
er-Price; Gamestar; Hayden Soft- 
ware; Infocom; Microprose; Mi- 
crosoft Corp.; Mindscape Soft- 
ware; Random House; Scholastic 
Software; Sierra On-Line; Simon 
& Schuster; Spinnaker; Spring- 
board: Strategic Simulations 
Inc.; subLOGlC; Telarium; and 
Windham Classics (ten winning 
families in this category). 



IXTH PRIZE 



1985 Grand Prize winners Rich and Kate 
Mancini, with son Matt and daughters 
Shannon and Tessa. 



SEIKO PC DATAGRAPH 
MODEL RC- 1000, 

a multifunction quartz wrist 

terminal which stores up to 2K of 

data. Required software and cables 

included; retails for S150. 



HOW TO ENTER 

We're proud lo announce our second annual 
nationwide search for ihe "Compullng Fam- 
ily of the Year." Yours could be one of the 
winning families featured in the pages of 
FAMILY COMPUTING. You could Win a Computer, 
monitor, or any other of the valuable hard- 
ware or software prizes that can Increase 
your whole family's computing enjoyment. 

WHO'S ELIGIBLE 

Any family that uses its computer in espe- 
cially efficient, rewarding, and/or creative 
ways! Enter your own family, or perhaps that 
of a friend or a favorite teacher whose ability 
and versatility In computing you admire. 
Write and tell us why you nominate them as 
our "Computing Family of the Year. " 

HOW TO WRITE YOUR ENTRY 

Answer the following questions. You can 

number the paragraphs If you'd like, but it's 

not mandatory. 

1. When and why did the family decide to 

buy a computer? What kind of computer did 

the family purchase? 

S. How does each family member use the 

computer? Include names and ages. 



3. Do the children use a computer in 
school? Is the computer at home used for 
educational purposes? If so. how? 

4. How does the family use the computer 
together? 

5. Which are the most efficient, rewarding, 
and/or creative ways the family uses its com- 
puter? If software is used, tell us the kinds. 

6. In what ways has the computer changed 
family members or the way they live? 

7. Has the computer lived up to original ex- 
pectations? Has the computer's use evolved 
with time? 

Also, we'd love to see a family photo — of the 
family computing, of course. (A casual snap- 
shot will do.) 

CONTEST RULES 

1. Your enlry should run no more than 
2,000 words, or about eight double-spaced. 
typewritten pages. 

2. Scholastic Inc. employees, advisory board 
members, and members of their families are 
not eligible. 

3. Previous winners of the "Computing 
Family of the Year Contest" are Ineligible. 

4. AH entries and photographs become the 
property of Scholastic Inc.. which reserves 



the right to use them in publications and 
promotions. Unfortunately. Scholastic inc. 
will not be able to acknowledge your entries. 
Entries and photographs will not be re- 
turned. 

5. Include your address and phone number 
(or. if you are nominating another family. 
include Its address and phone number). 

6. No cash substitutions for prizes. 

Deadline; All entries must be postmarked 

by March 31, 1986. 

Judges! Entries will be Judged by a panel of 

Scholastic employees. Judges' decisions are 

final. 

Winners: The winners will be announced in 

the September 1986 Issue of famd-Y coirfPUTlNG. 

FAMILY 
€@MPUTiiiC 

Nominating letters should be mailed to; Su- 
zette Harvey. Computing Family of The Year 
Contest, c/o family coMPirriNC, Scholastic Inc., 
730 Broadway. New York. NY 10003. 



52 FAMILY COMPUTiNG 



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TIPS TO THE TYPIST 



Typing In family computing's programs is a great way to 
become familiar with your computer and get some free 
software "to boot." But it's frustrating to type in a long 
program only to find it doesn't work as it should. When 
this happens, simple typing errors are most often the 
cause. So to help you gain greatest value from the time 
you spend computing with us. we've put together some 
tips on how to avoid typing errors— and what to do if a 
program doesn't run right. Read them carefully and you 11 
be up and running in no time! 



SOME GENiRAL RULES 



1 • Do read Instructions and program headings carefully. 
Make sure your computer has enough memory, the right 
version of BASIC, and the appropriate peripherals (joy- 
sticks, printers, disk drives, etc.) for a program. 

2* Don't let fatigue and boredom contribute to inaccura- 
cy. If you're new to programming, try typing In shorter 
programs first. Type in a longer program In easy stages. 
SAVEing each installment as you go. 

3* Until you are fairly familiar with BASIC, do assume 
that every word, number, letter, space, and punctuation 
mark in a program listing must be copied accurately if the 
program is to function as Intended. 

fl» Do watch out for potential trouble spots. About 90 
percent of all typing errors occur in data statements: long 
lines filled with numbers or incomprehensible secret 
codes. If possible, have someone else read data to you as 
you type, and help you proofread it if you have trouble 
later on. Proofreading from a printout is best. 

5* Do be aware that program listings printed in family 
computing sometimes differ from what you will see on your 
computer's screen or in printouts you produce at home. 
Our program listings are printed 54 characters wide. 
Thus, a single BASIC program "line" (sometimes called a 
"logical line") may appear as several lines in our listing. If 
you are typing along and reach the right margin of the 
printed listing, don't press RETURN or ENTER until 
you've checked to see if the program "line" you're typing 
really ends there. The way to tell is to check if the line 
following begins with a multiple of 10 that follows in 
sequence from the previous logical line, rem statements 
are the exception and typing them in is optional. 

Several computers (ADAM, Apple. Atari, and Tl) format 
BASIC programs according to unique rules of their own. 
Don't let this tHrow you—just type in the listing exactly as 
printed in the magazine and your computer is guaran- 
teed to accept it, even though It may end up looking a little 
different on your screen. 

6» One foolproof way to correct an error in a BASIC 
program line is to type the line in again from the begin- 
ning, and press RETURN or ENTER to set it in place of the 
old one In your computer's memory. 



WHICH PROGRAMS WILL RUN ON MY COMPUTER? 




Unless a program heading indicates otherwise, programs 



will run on any version of the computer specified, with the 
following exceptions; 

• Apple programs run under Applesoft [not Integer) BA- 
SIC on the Apple 11 (with language card). II plus. He. and 
lie. 

• IBIVI compatibility of BASIC programs is determined 
by both the hardware and the version of BASIC used. Our 
programs for IBM PC & compatibles are composed on IBM 
PC & PCjrs, and tested under most versions of BASIC avail- 
able for these machines. They are then tested on a variety 
of IBM-compatible machines under the versions of BASIC 
supplied with them.Each"IBM PC & compatibles" program 
listing is supplemented by a rundown of the machines and 
versions of BASIC under which the program is guaranteed 
to work. Most programs will probably run on many other 
PC Compatibles and under other versions of BASIC 

• TI programs not marked "w/TI Extended BASIC" should 
be run under standard (console) TI BASIC. 



e: 



DEBUGGING HINTS 



Sometimes even the most careful typist makes a mis- 
take. Don't expect your program to run right off the bat. If 
you have problems, remain patient and follow these gener- 
al instructions for a probable quick fix. 

1 • Write down any error messages you receive. 

2* If necessary, look these up in your manual, and check 
the indicated lines for simple mistakes. Also check related 
lines (see No. 4, below), such as the DATA statements corre- 
sponding to a READ routine. Correct all the problems you 
can find, and save a corrected copy of the program before 
typing RUN again. If you're lucky, all systems will be GO; if 
not . , . . 

3* list the program in screen-size chunks (check your 
manual for instructions on how to list parts of a pro- 
gram). Even better, if you have a printer, get a printout. 
Compare what you've typed in — letter by letter — to the 
published program. Make sure that you haven't typed the 
numeral (which is slashed in our listings) for the letter O 
(which isn't), swapped a small letter "I" for the numeral 
one, dropped or mixed up some punctuation, switched 
uppercase text for lowercase, or vice versa (particularly in 
data statements or within quotes), or miscounted the 
characters (and/or spaces) between a pair of quotes. Get 
someone to help you if possible. 

4* Check your data statements — then check them again. 
Mistakes in data statements are the single most common 
cause of program failures. Bad data can cause a program 
to malfunction at any point, which can be misleading. If 
you can't find your error in the lines the computer speci- 
fies, check your data statements line by line, letter by 
letter, comma by comma. Then have someone else check 
it for you. 

5* If all else fails, turn off your computer and relax. Then 
try again the next day — exhausted proofreaders are care- 
less proofreaders. 



56 FAMILY COMPUTING 



PRESCHOOL PROGRAM 



BABY BOX 

BY JOEY LATIMER 




What do you do when 
you're working on your 
home computer and your 
small child comes over to 
see what you're doing? I al- 
ways used to wish there 
were some way I could let 
my daughter, Erin, play 
with the machine and get 
comfortable with it. Unfor- 
tunately, though I had ac- 
cess to a huge library of 
software, there weren't any 
programs I could find that 
would appeal to a one-year- 
old. For a while, Erin and I 
played with the word-pro- 
cessor, but she was too 
young for typing and end- 
ed up being more interest- 
ed in the beeping of the 
keyboard than in literary 
experiments. Then I tried 
some arcade games, but 
she had a hard time un- 
derstanding how to push 
the joystick (actually, she 
preferred chewing on it). 

Eventually, however, my 
wife and I noticed some- 
thing that solved our prob- 
lem. Erin's "activity box" 
had something like a trak 
ball in it, and when she sat 
in her Infant seat she 
could spin it with her feet. 
'Hmmm. . ." we thought. 
"Let's put a real trak ball 
in front of her, and see if 
she can spin that," It 
worked. She could spin it 
Just the same. 

Knowing this, I went to 
the computer and wrote a 
little program that would 
change the colors of the 
screen and play musical 
notes each time the trak 



ball was spun. 

We call our little program 
Baby Box. and we're happy 

that FAMILY COMPtmNC iS 

sharing it with you. 

Because most people 
don't own trak balls, we've 
modified the original pro- 
gram so that It works with 
the keyboard or a joystick. 
(However, if you do own a 
trak ball and can plug it 
into your computer's joy- 
stick port, it should work, 
also.) To use the program, 
type it into your computer, 
then SAVE it to disk or cas- 
sette. Next, if you have a 
joystick (or trak ball), plug 
it into port number one. 
Then type run. Seat your 
child safely in an infant 
seat, high chair, or on 
your lap, and give him or 
her access to the controller 
or keyboard. Each time the 
child presses a key or 
moves the controller (or 
presses the controller's 
button), the screen will 
change colors, and the 
computer will play a tone, 
randomly picked from a 
musical scale. 

Remember that young 
children have ver>' short at- 
tention spans — usually less 
than five minutes. Don't be 
upset if your child doesn't 
seem interested at first, or 
even seems a little afraid. 
Don't force things. Start 
with the volume turned 
down low, and let the baby 
explore a little. It won't be 
long before your little one 
is banging out a colorful 
tune on the Baby Box. 



Adam/Baby Box 

10 LOMEM: 29008 

Z9 FOR i = H80M TO 28012 

30 READ a 

4B POKE i,a 

50 NEXT i 

59 REM —SET WHITE TEXT ON BLACK BACKGROUND— 

60 POKE 17115,240 
70 TEXT 

80 PRINT TAB(11);"*-BABY BOX-*" 

90 PRINT 

100 PRINT TABC4);"Press the keys or move the" 

110 PRINT TAB<12);"joystick." 

120 VTAB 20:HTAB 5 

130 PRINT "Press any key to start." 

140 GET kS 

150 HOME 

160 X = 

169 REM ~P1?EPARE FOR KEYPRESS— 

170 CALL 28007 

179 REM ~"PEEK(6488S)" TELLS LAST KEY PRESSED— 

180 IF PDL<5) <> OR P&LC7) <> OR PDLC9) <> OR PD 
LC13) <> 15 OR PEEKC64S85) <> THEN 270 

190 IF X = THEN 180 

200 X = x+1 

210 IF X < 50 THEN 180 

219 REM —TURN OFF SOUND— 

220 POKE 28006,159 
230 CALL 28000 
240 POKE 17115,240 
250 TEXT 

2M GOTO 160 
270 X = 1 

280 back = INTCRNDCI )*14)+2 
290 fore = back+INTCRNDCI >*13)+1 
300 IF fore > 15 THEN fore = fore-14 
309 REH —SET RANDOM TEXT AND BACKGROUND COLORS- 
SI© POKE 17115, back+16*fore 
320 TEXT 

329 REM —PLAY A RANDOM NOTE— 

330 POKE 28006, 130+INT(RNDC0)*10) 
340 CALL 28000 

350 POKE 28006, 20+INTCRND(03*50) 

360 CALL 28000 

370 POKE 28006,144 

380 CALL 28000 

390 GOTO 170 

1000 DATA 58, 102, 109,211,255,201, 0,62,0,50, 117,253,201 



Apple II series/BnIix Box 

10 FOR S = 768 TO 796 
20 READ A 
30 POKE S,A 
40 NEXT S 

49 REH —PREPARE FOR KEYPRESS— 

50 POKE -16368,0 
60 P0 = PDL(0) 
70 PI = PDL(I) 
80 HGR 

90 PRINT TAB(15);"*-BABY BOX-*" 

100 PRINT 

110 PRINT TAB(3);"PReSS THE KEYS OR HOVE THE JOYSTICK. 

II 

120 PITCH = 

129 REM 16286 IS TRIGGER, -16384 KEYBOARD STATUS— 

130 IF ABS(PDL(0)-P0) > 2 OR ABS(PDLC1)-P1 ) > 2 OR PEE 
K(-16286:i > 127 OR PEEK(-16384) > 127 THEN 220 

140 IF PITCH = THEN 130 

149 REM —PLAY A LONG NOT£~ 

150 POKE 6,200 
160 POKE 8,PITCH 
170 CALL 768 

180 HCOL0R= » 



JANUARY 1986 57 




PRESCHOOL PROGRAM 




189 REM —SET GRAPHICS SCREEN TO CURRENT HCOLOR— 

19B HPLOT 1,1 

2M CALL 62^.54 

2ia GOTO 120 

22e P0 = PDL(0) 

238 PI = PDL(I) 

lk<b POKE -16368,0 

253 FOR D = 1 TO 15fl 

260 NEXT D 

270 HCOLOR= INT(RND(1)*8) 

280 HPLOT 1,1 

290 CALL 62454 

300 PITCH = RND(1)*200+50 

310 POKE 6,10 

320 POKE 8,PITCH 

330 CALL 768 

340 GOTO 130 

1000 DATA 165,8,74,133,10,164,8,173,48,192,136,234 

1010 DATA 234,208,251,165,7,56,229,10,133,7,176,237 

1020 DATA 198,6,208,233,96 



Atari 400, 800, 600/800XL, & 130XE/Bafix fiex 

10 GRAPHICS 2+16 

20 PRINT #6;" *-SABY BOX-*" 

30 PRINT #6 

40 PRINT #6;" PRESS THE KEYS OR" 

50 PRINT #6;" HOVE THE JOYSTICK." 

60 X=0 

69 REH — "PEEKC764)" TELLS LAST KEY PRESSED— 

70 IF STICKC0)<>15 OR STRIGt0)=0 OR PEEK(764)<>255 THE 
N 150 

80 IF X=0 THEN 70 
90 X=X+1 

100 IF X<65 THEN 70 
110 SOUND 0,0,0,0 

119 REM —RETURN TEXT COLOR TO YELLOW— 

120 POKE 708,25 
130 SETCOLOR 4,0,0 
140 GOTO 60 

150 X=1 

159 REH —PREPARE FOR ANOTHER KEYPRESS— 

160 POKE 764,255 

169 REM —SET TEXT TO RANDOM COLOR— 

170 POKE 708,INT(RND(1)*16)*16+4 
180 SETCOLOR 4,INTCRND(1)*16),6 

190 SOUND 0,52+INTCRND(1)*12)*9,10,6 
200 GOTO 70 



Cemmpdore 64 & 128 (C 64 niode)/Babx Box 

9 REH —TURN ON KEY REPEAT— 

10 POKE 650,128 
20 S=54272 

30 FOR 1=0 TO 23 

40 POKE S+I,0 

50 NEXT I 

60 PRINT CHR$(147) 

70 PRINT TA8C14);"*-BA8Y BOX-*" 

80 PRINT 

90 PRINT TABC2);"PRESS THE KEYS OR HOVE THE JOYSTICK." 

99 REH —TURN ON VOLUHE— 

100 POKE 54296,15 

109 REH —SET ATTACK/DECAY/SUSTAIN/RELEASE— 

110 POKE 54277,100 
120 POKE 54278,100 
130 X=0 

140 GET K$ 

149 REM — PEEK{56321) GIVES JOYSTICK, TRIGGER STATUS- 
ISC IF (PEEK(56321) AND 15)<>15 OR CPEEKC56321) AND 16 
)<>16 OR K$<>"" THEN 230 
160 IF X=0 THEN 140 
170 X=X+1 

180 IF X<40 THEN 140 
189 REH —TURN OFF SOUND— 



190 POKE 54276,0 

199 REH —RETURN SCREEN COLOR TO BLUE— 

200 POKE 53281,6 

209 REM —RETURN BORDER COLOR TO LIGHT BLUE- 

210 POKE 53280,14 
220 GOTO 130 

230 X=1 

240 C=INTCRNDC0)*16) 

250 IF C=U THEN 220 

259 REH —SET BACKGROUND TO A RANOOH COLOR— 

260 POKE 53281, C 

269 REH —SET BORDER TO A RANDOH COLOR— 

270 POKE 53280,INT(RNDC0)*16) 

279 REH —SET A RANDOH NOTE C2 POKES) — 

280 POKE 54273, INTCRNDC0)*22)+1 
290 POKE 54272, INT(RND(0)*200)+20 

299 REH —PLAY NOTE— 

300 POKE 54276,17 
310 GOTO 140 



IBM PC & compatibles*/Babx Box 

10 DEF SEG=0 

20 SCREEN 1,1 

30 WIDTH 40 

40 KEY OFF 

50 STRIG ON 

60 CLS 

70 S0=ST1C>;(0) 

80 S1=ST1CK(1) 

90 LOCATE 4,14:PRINT "*-BABY BOX-*" 

100 LOCATE 8,2:PRiNT "PRESS THE KEYS OR HOVE THE JOYST 

ICK." 

110 PITCH=0 

120 IF ABS(STICK(0)-S0)>2 OR ABSCSTICKC1)-S1)>2 OR STR 

IGC1)<>0 OR INKEYSO"" THEN 170 

130 IF PITCH=0 THEN 120 

140 SOUND P1TCH,20 

150 COLOR 0,1 

160 GOTO 110 

169 REH —CLEAR KEYBOARD BUFFER— 

170 POKE 1050,PEEKn052> 
180 FOR D=1 TO 200 

190 NEXT D 

200 S0=STICKt0) 

210 S1=STICK(1) 

220 COLOR INT(RND*3)+1,INTCRND*2)+1 

230 PITCH=RND*1 800+1 50 

240 SOUND PITCH,2 

250 GOTO 120 

*7li£s program Ijos been tested aridfound to work on the Joliowing computers and 

hardware con/igurarions. tisiru^ the BASlCs shown: IBM PC W'CotonGraphtcs Monitor 

Adapter. wiDlsk BASIC D2.00 or Advanced BASIC A2.00. IBM PCjr. wiCassette BASIC 

Ci.20 or Cartridge BASiC J i, 00. Tandy 1000. wIGW-BASIC 2.02 iierslon 00.05.00. 

Tandy requires Joystick llejt portl. 

Macintosh w/Microsefl BASIC 2.0*/ Baby Box 

REM —SET UP SCREEN; FIND HOUSE— 

CLS 

HX=H0USEC1) 

MY=H0USE(2) 

WINDOW 4, "INSTRUCTIONS", (2, 315)- (508,337), 1 

PRINT TABC12);"Press the keys or move the mouse to 
pLay a note."; 

WINDOW 1,"BABY BOX",(2,40)-(508,295),1 

WINDOW OUTPUT 1 
NOSOUND : 

P1TCH=0 
KEYPRESS: 

KEY=< INKEYSO"") 

BUTN=(HOUSE(0)<0) 

H0V=<CH0USEC1)<>MX) OR (H0USE(2)<>HY)) 

IF KEY OR BUTN OR MOV THEN ORAWCIRCLE 

IF PITCH=0 THEN KEYPRESS 
REH —PLAY A LONG NOTE- 
SOUND PITCH, 10 

FOR D=1 TO 500 



^ 



58 FAMILY COMPUTING 



PRESCHOOL PROCRAIA 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 5 



NEXT t> 

CLS 

GOTO NOSOUNO 
DRAWCIRCLE: 

MX=H0USE(1) 

HY=M0USEC2) 

X=INTC491*RND) 

Y=INTC251*RN0) 

R=INT(35*RND)+5 

CIRCLE CX,Y),R 
REH —PLAY A SHORT NOTE— 

FOR 0=1 TO 1M 

NEXT D 

PITCK=INTC1^«»RND)+5e 

SOUND PITCH/I 

GOTO KEYPRESS 
■Because ihe Afaclntosh doesnt hotie coiors, this iieraUm uses graphics. 

Tandy Color Compute r/BcifiX Box 

10 CLS 

29 J0=JOYSTK(0) 
3? J1=J0YSTKC1) 

Aa PRINTa138,"*-BABY BOX-*" 

50 PRlNTa259, "PRESS THE KEYS OR HOVE THE" 

60 PRINTaE99, "JOYSTICK." 

70 PRlNTa3S6, "PRESS ANY KEY TO BEGIN." 

80 IF INKEY$="" THEN 80 

90 CLS 

10« PMODE 3,1 

110 PCLS 

120 SCREEN 1,0 

130 PITCH=0 

139 REM — PEEKC65280)=254 IF TRIGGER IS PRESSED— 

U0 IF ABS(JOYSTKC0)-J0»2 OR ABS(J0YSTK<1)-J1)>2 OR P 

EEK(6S280)=254 OR INKEY$<>"" THEN 190 

150 IF PITCH=0 THEN 140 

160 SOUND PITCH,25 

170 PCLS(I) 

180 GOTO 130 

190 J0=JOYSTK<0) 

200 J1=J0YSTK(1) 

210 PCLSaNT(RND<0)*4)) 

220 PITCH=RNDC0)*200+50 

230 SOUND PITCH, 5 

240 GOTO 140 

Tandy Model 4 *IBaby Box 

9 REM —TO STOP PROGRAM, PRESS <CLEAR>-<COHMA) — 

10 ON ERROR GOTO 390 
20 DIM RC(18) 

30 RANDOM 

40 SYSTEM "SYSTEM CBREAK=OFFV' 

50 CLS 

60 PRINT CHR$(15);CHR$<21) 

70 FOR X=1 TO 18 

80 READ RC(X) 

90 NEXT X 

100 PRINT TABC33);"*-BABY BOX-*" 

110 PRINTS1671, "PRESS THE KEYS." 

120 KS=INKEYS 

130 IF K$="" THEN 120 

140 CLS 

150 IF K$=CHR$(91) THEN 410 

160 A=RND{19)-1 

170 B=RNDC6«)-1 

180 W=RND(19)+1 

190 H=RNDC3)+1 

200 C=RC(RN0C18)) 

210 PRINTa(A,B),STRINGSCW,C) 

220 FOR X=1 TO H 

230 PRINTa(A+X,B),CHRS(C);SPCCW-2);CHR$CC) 

240 NEXT X 

250 PRINTS(A+H,B>,STRING$CM,C) 

260 FOR X=1 TO 5 

270 PITCH=RND(8)-1 



BEYOND 

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Speeding spaceships, frantic ahens, exploding 
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Special Effects Library. The ready-to-use 
graphic, music, and sound effects can be modified 
or incorporated directly into your BASIC 
programs. Ideal for all programmers. $29.95 
For the Commodore 64 and Ap ple Ile/c. 

BASIC Booster Library adds speed and power 
to your BASIC programs by letting you create ap- 
plication screens, menus, and messages quickly 
and easily— outside of BASIC. Save hours of pro- 
gramming time. Your BASIC programs will be 
faster and easier to change. $29.95 

For the IBM PC and Ap ple Ile/c. 
To order, call toll-free: 1-800-437-4329. 

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CIRCLE READER SERVICE 56 



JANUARV 1986 59 



PRESCHOOL PROGRAM 



ARCADE GAME 




28e SOUND PITCH,0 

29C NEXT X 

3W FOR 0=1 TO 10 

310 NEXT D 

320 CLS 

330 KS=INKEY$ 

3A0 IF K$<>"" THEN 150 

350 IF PITCH=0 THEN 330 

360 SOUND P1TCH,3 

370 PITCH=0 

380 GOTO 330 

390 CLS 

400 PRINT "YOU'VE MADE A TYPING ERROR; PLEASE CHECK YD 

UR PROGRAM." 

410 PRINT CHR$(14);CHRIC21) 

420 SYSTEM "SYSTEM (BR£AK=ON>" 

430 END 

1000 DATA 192,193,194,195,196,197,200^210,220 

1010 DATA 228,229,234,235,236,238,252,253,254 

"Because (he Tandy Model 4 doesn'i haue colors, this version uses graphics. 

lt.99laAJBaby Bex 

9 REM —BE SURE <ALPHA LOCK> KEY IS UP— 

10 CALL CLEAR 

20 PRINT TABC9);"*-8ABY BOX-*" 

30 PRINT 

40 PRINT " PRESS THE KEYS OR HOVE THE" 

50 PRINT TAB(11);"J0YSTICK." 

60 PITCH=0 

70 CALL KEY(3,K,S) 

80 CALL J0YST<1,X1,Y1) 

90 CALL KEYC1,K,F> 

100 IF (X1<>a)+(Y1<>0)+CS<>0)+CF<>0)THEN 150 

110 IF PITCH=0 THEN 70 

120 CALL SOUND(10fla,PITCH,0) 

130 CALL SCREEN(4) 

140 GOTO 60 

150 CALL SCREEN(INT(RND*143+3) 

160 FOR D=1 TO 40 

170 NEXT D 

180 PITCH=RNt)*2000+20a 

190 CALL S0UND(2, PITCH, 0) 

200 GOTO 70 

VIC-20/BaJbx Box 

9 REM —TURN ON KEY REPEAT— 

10 POKE 650,128 

19 REM —TURN ON VOLUHE— 

20 POKE 36878,15 

30 PRINT CHR$(147);TABC5>;"*-BABY BOX-*" 

40 PRINT 

50 PRINT "PRESS THE KEYS OR MOVE"; 

60 PRINT TABC26);"THE JOYSTICK." 

70 X=0 

80 GET KS 

89 REM —PREPARE TO READ JOYSTICK: TURN OFF KEYBOARD— 

90 POKE 37154,127 

99 REM — PEEK(37137), PEEK{37152> READ JOYSTICK— 

100 JS=CPEEKC37137) AND 28)/4+(PEEKC37152) AND 12S)/16 

109 REM —TURN KEYBOARD BACK ON— 

110 POKE 37154,255 

120 IF JS015 OR <PEEKC37137) AND 32)=0 OR K$<>"" THEN 

190 

130 IF X=0 THEN 70 

140 X=X+1 

150 IF X<20 THEN 80 

159 REM —RETURN SCREEN AND BORDER TO NORMAL COLORS— 

160 POKE 36879,27 

169 REM —TURN SOUND OFF— 

170 POKE 36876,0 
180 GOTO 70 

190 X=1 

200 C=INT(RND(0)*16) 

210 IF C=6 THEN 200 

220 POKE 36879,8+16*C+INTCRNDC0)*8) 

)230 POKE 36876, 128+RNDC0)*100 

240 GOTO 80 



HAP^r HURDLER 



BY JOEY LATIMER 



TIIt= 88:24 HURDLES LCFT= 11 



m 





I ) J 



«THE TIICS TO BEfiT* 

68:33— 60L^ 
88:41— SILVER 
88:48— BROHZE 



In the suburban neighbor- 
hood where I grew up, it 
was quite common to see 
hedges growing along the 
walkways in front of 
houses. Running around 
the comer to my best 
friend's house meant tra- 
versing seven lawns, eight 
driveways, three walkways, 
and six hedges. We turned 
it into a game — my friend 
and I — racing from one 
house to the other. Since 
we were about even at run- 
ning on flat ground, the 
key to winning a race was 
to be the best at jumping 
over the hedges, bicycles, 
hoses, and other front-yard 
obstacles that were in our 
way. A missed hedge would 
not only slow you down, 
but it could produce some 
nice scrapes and bruises, 
too. 

To mentally prepare my- 
self for races with my 
friend, I used to imagine 
that 1 was a champion hur- 



dler. 1 hoped that some day 
a great Olympic coach 
would drive down the 
street, see me in my glory, 
and lake me away to for- 
eign competitions. Ha. 
Like so many dreams 1 had 
as a child, this one, too, 
slowly faded away . . . until 
now. 

In an attempt to fulfill 
my long-time desire for 
gold medals, I've put to- 
gether a game called Hap- 
py Hurdler. The object of 
the game is simple— jump 
over hurdles by pressing 
the "J" key. Beat the times 
shown on the screen and 
you'll win a medal: gold, 
silver, or bronze. Tripping 
over a hurdle will cost you 
valuable time, so be care- 
ful! Fortunately, since 
Happy Hurdler is just a 
computer simulation, you 
won't receive any serious 
injuries if you fall . . . un- 
less, of course, you get 
mad and kick the table! 



Apple II series/Happx Mvnffer 

10 POKE 232,252: POKE 233,29 

20 POKE 115,252:P0KE 116,29 

30 DIM CM$C4),AU$(3),MDC3) 

40 ST = 7676:3 = -16336:MD<1) = 73:PZ = 1000 



50 T$ = 

60 FOR I 

70 FOR I 

80 FOR I 

90 FOR I 

100 NEXT I 

110 TEXT:HOHE:PRINT "WELCOME, CONTESTANT." 

120 INPUT "WHAT'S YOUR NAME?";N$ 

t30 IF LEN(NS) > 10 THEN N$ = LeFT$CN$,10) 



TIHE:":KS = "HURDLES LEFT:" 

TO 87:READ SH:POKE I+ST,SH:NEXT I 

1 TO 4:READ CM$<I):NEXT I 

1 TO 3:READ AWSCI):NEXT I 

2 TO 3:M0(I) = HDa-1)+2+INT(RND<1)*2) 



60 FAMILY COMPUTING 



Commodore 64 

COMPUTER _ 

$10095* 




Commodore 

CI 28 Computer 

$289.00 * 

CI 28 1571 

Disk Drive 

$259.00 * 



FREE SOFTWARE COUPON . 

SUPER OFFER (Expires ll 86) SUPER OFFER 

To introduce you to the CI 28 computer, we ore offering you YOUR FIRST $30 OF 

SOFTWARE from our 64 page catolog fWf when you buy a G CI 28 Computer from 
Protecto. Just send this coupon along with your order. Choose software worth S30 or 
more at sale prices from our 64 page catalog and subtract $30 from the total. 



$30 



(1 Coupon per family) 



Software From Prolecto's 64 Page Catalog Only ^ gQ 




Commodore C128 Computer $289.00. This all-new revolutionary 128K computer uses Commodore 64 computer software, 
CPM Software, plus new advanced C-1 28 software. You pay only S289 for the CI 28 computer ! Less the value of the Special 
Software Discount Coopon (see page 14 of our 64 page catalog) we pack with your computer thai allows you to Save 
Over S2S0 off software sale prices! ! With only $100 of savings applied your net computer cost is $189.00. PLUS SM.OO 
Your Choice FREE Software.** 

340K 1571 Commodore Disk Drive $259.00. Double Sided, Single Disk Drive for C-128 allows you to use C-128 mode plus 
CPM mode 17 times faster than the 1541, plus runs Commodore 64 software. You pay only $259.00 for the 340K 1571 
Commodore Disk Drive. Less the value of the Special Software Discount Coupon (see page 14 of our 64 page catalog] 
we pack with your Disk Drive that allows you to Save Over $250 off software sole prices! With only $100 of savmgs 
opplied your net Disk Drive cost is only $1 59.00. 



Add SIO.OO for shipping, hondiing ond insufance. Illinois residents 
please add b% ton. Add S20.00 (or CANADA, PUERTO RICO. HAWAII. 
ALASKA, APO-FPO orders, Canadion orders must he in U.S. dollars. 
WE DO NOT EXPORT TO OTHER COUNTRIES. EXCEPT CANADA. 
Enclose Coshiers Check. Money Order or Personol Check. Allow IJ 
days lor delivery. 2 to 7 days tor phone orders, I doy express tnoili 
VISA — MASTER CARD — C.O.D. 

No C.O.D. to Conado, APO-FPO. 



We JLove Our Customers 

22292 N. Pepper Rd., Barrington, Illinois 60010 

312/382-5244 to order 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 42 



mi 


T^ 


TTIfT 


Ma 


nSt 


or Sale 



* Composite * RGB • Sound 

Home Computers VCRs Modular TV Tutners Video Games 



so*® 



Excellent Color Reproduction 

& Special "Green Screen 

Only" Option 

True color reproduction is 
achieved by a Zenith 
designed sta1e-of-the-art 
integrated circuit chip that 
processes the composite 
video signal. A custom 
Zenith analog RGB direct 
drive gain control integrated 
circuit allows user- 
preference lor the 
adjustment of picture drive 
and black level. Zenith's 
unique "Green Screen Only" 
feature eliminates oil other 
colors so that 
monochromatic text 
material may be easily 
displayed in green on the 
black face screen. 



Constant Intensity Character 

Definition Quality i 

Quality circuitry design generates 
crisp lines, pure colors, and sharp 
character definition for easy-to- 
read displays. DC-coupling 
permits the video display to 
retain its color balance from 
a single dot to a full screen 
of data. Even when room 
lighting changes, a "special 
light sensor" automatically 
adjusts the display 
brightness. 

List S499.00 



!139 



95 



LIMITED 

QUANTITIES 




Sale $139.95 



ZVM 131 -Accessible by 
Many Popular Systems 

The ZVM 131 is designed 
to interface with most 
personal computers, 
VCRs, video discs, video 
games and modular TV 
tuners that have either 
composite video or RGB 
direct drive outputs. 



Compatibility Chart 

Computer Interfaces Via 



Apple II 
Aplus 3000 
Apple III 
IBM PC 

Commodore 128 
Commodore i4 
Commodore Vic-20 
Tl «/4 
Atari 800 
Atari 1200 
Atari 1400 



Connection Cables 



Composite 

RGB 

RGB 

RGB 

RGB/Composite 

Composite 

Composite 

Composite 

Composite 

Composite 

Composite 



RGB Cable — $19.95 

C128. Aplus 3000 (Specify) 



Composite — $9.95 

Commodore. Aplus 3000, Atari (Specify) 



The ZVM 131 
Sound Of Quality 

The output sound level is 
externally regulated by a 
user-adjustment volume 
control. Use the Zenith 
quality sound system to 
monitor the modern oudio 
capabilities of the computer 
generation. 

Edsy-To-Reach Front Access 
Controls 

ZVM 13rs 13" diagonal 
display screen can exhibit 
impressive grophics and 
intensely cleor copy. Eosy- 
to-reach front access user 
controls (picture, black 
level, color level, tint, 
sharpness, audio volume, 
bockground noise control) 
make display adjustment 
simple and fast. An LED 
power on indicator notifies 
the user when the monitor is 
operable. 

Multiple Monitors On 
A Single Computer 

The composite video "loop-thru" 
feature permits a single 
composite video source to drive 
several monitors at the same 
time. This allows easy display 
possibilities for multiple 
viewers in business and 
educational applications. No 
more crowding oround a single 
terminal. Everyone enjoys a 
clear, unobstructed view of 
important dota. 



This Is The Best V alue Of The Century 

Add SI 7.50 for shiDDina. hondlina and in^urnnrf lllmni^ rotiHont^ 



Add SI 7.50 for shipping, tiondling and insurance, Illinois residents 
please add 6*/. ton. Add S35.00 lor CANADA, PUERTO RICO, HAWAII 
ALASKA. APO-fPO orders. Canodion orders must be in U S ctollors 
WE DO NOT EXPORT TO OTHER COUNTRIES EXCEPT CANADA. 
Enclose Cosliiers Check. Money Order or Personal Check. Allow 14 
days for delivery, 2 to 7 doys lor phone orders. I day express mail! 

VISA - MASTER CARD - C O.D. 
No COD. to Conodo. APO-FPO 



COMPUTER DIRECT 

Wc Love Our Customers 
22292 N. Pepper Rd., Barrington, III. 60010 

312/382-5050 to order 

CIRCLE READER SERVICE 43 



OIANT PRINTER SALE!! 



Lisi S399.00 



10" Printer 



E 



M79 



00 



E 



I Year Warranty 

120-140 CPS 

Premium Quality 



10" Comstar lOX - This Bi-directional 
Tractor/Friction Printer prints 
standard sheet 8i^"xll" paper and 
continuous forms or labels. High 
resolution bit image graphics, 
underlining, horizontal tab setting, true 
lower descenders, with super scripts and 
subscripts, prints standard pica, 
compressed, expanded, block graphics, 
etc. Fantastic value. (Centronics 
parallel interface.) 
List $399.00. Sale $179.00. 




List $499.00 



10" Printer 



$ 



E 



229 



00 



E 



I Y&ar Warranty 

150-170 CPS 

High Speed 



10" Comstar 160+ High Speed - This 
Bi-directiona! Tractor/Friction Printer 
combines the above features of the 10" 
Comstar lOX with speed (150-170 ops) 
and durability. Plus you get a 2K buffer, 
96 user definable characters, super 
density bit image graphics, and square 
print pins for clearer, more legible print 
(near letter quality). This is the best 
value for a rugged dependable printer. 
(Centronics parallel interface.) 
ListS499.00. Sale $229.00. 




List $599.00 



10" Printer 



^259 



00 



E 



Lifetime warranty* 

165-185 CPS 

High Speed & Letter Ot/ality 



10" Comstar 2000 — The ultimate printer 
has arrived! This Bi-directional 
Tractor/Friction Printer gives you all 
the' features of the Comstar 160 plus 
higher speed (165-185 cps), 256 
downloadable characters, proportional 
setting, external dark printing mode and 
a *lifetime printhead warranty. PLUS ... 




List $599.00 15V2" Printer 



$ 



E 



239 



OOi 



E 



15'/z" Comstar 15X - Has all the 
features of the 10" Comstar lOX plus a 
wider 15i^" carriage and more powerful 
electronics to handle large ledger 
business forms! (Better than FX-lOO). 
The 15\ti" Comstar 15X also prints on 
standard size paper and continuous 
forms and labels. Fantastic value. 
(Centronics parallel Interface.) 
List $599.00. Sale $239.00. 



List $699.00 151/2" Printer 



$ 



E 



289 



00 



s 



E 



1.51/2" Comstar 160+ High Speed - This 
Bi-directional Tractor/Friction Printer 
has all the features of the 10" Comstar 
160+ High Speed plus a wider 15^/6" 
carriage and the heavy duty electronics 
required for today's business loads. You 
can use large ledger business forms as 
well as standard sheets and continuous 
forms and labels. This is the best wide 
carriage printer in the U.S.A. 
(Centronics parallel interface.) 
List $699.00. Sale $289.00. 



List $599.00 



10" Printer 



$ 



259 



00 



E 



With the flip of a switch you can go into 
the letter quality mode which makes all 
your printing look like it came off a 
typewriter. Turn in term papers, do 
articles or just print programs. Have the 
best of letter quality and speed in one 
package. Fantastic printer (Centronics 
parallel interface.) 
List $599.00. Sale $259.00. 



' 75 Day Fr&e Trial — I Year Immediate Replacem ent Warranty 
Parallel Interfaces ^ 

Commodore-64, VIC 20 - $39.00 Atari - $59.00 Apple II, II + . He - $59.00 



Add SIO.OO (SU.50 tor 15'," Printers) for shipping', handling and 
insurance, Illinois residents please add 6% tax. Add S20.00 tar 
CANADA PUERTO RICO. HAWAII, ALASKA. APO-FPO orders. 
Conodian orders must be in U.S. dollars. WE DO NOT EXPORT TO 
OTHER COUNTRIES. EXCEPT CANADA. 

Enclose Cashiers Check. Money Order or Personal Check. Allow U 
days tar delivery. 2 to 7 doys for phone orders. I day express moiS I 
VISA — MASTER CARD - C.O.D. No C.O.D. to Conodo. APO-FPO 



We Love Our Customers 

22292 N. Pepper Rd., Barringlon, Illinois 60010 

312/382-5244 to order 

CIRCLE READER SERVICE 44 



ARCADE GAME 




lAO HOHE:HGR:HCOLOR= 3:SCALE= 4:R0T= ®:VTAB 21 

ISe PRINT TABt5);"PRESS <S> TO START; <J> TO JUMP." 

169 PRINT TABC11);"*THE TIMES TO BEAT*" 

17B PRINT " ";H0(1J;" = GOLC ";HD(2);" = SILVER 

;MDC3);" = BRONZE" 

180 If PZ = 1008 THEN 200 

190 PRINT TABC11-LEN(N$)/2);N$;"'S PERSONAL BEST: ";PZ 

200 HPLOT 59,40 TO 219,40 TO 219,100 

210 HPLOT TO 59,100 TO 59,40 

220 HCOLOR= 3:DRAW 3 AT 130,70 

230 POKE -16368,0 

240 K = PEEKC-1638A):IF K <> 211 ANB K <> 243 THEN 240 

250 POKE -16368,0 

260 HCOLOR= 4: DRAW 3 AT X,Y 

270 H0HE:VTA8 21 

280 PRINT TABC8); "HURDLES LEFT:";TAB(27);"TIHE: 0" 

290 PRINT:PR1NT TABC12>;"PRESS <J> TO JUMP." 

300 POKE -16368,0 

310 DL = 5:PA = 215:PB = 215:HA = 5:HB = 5:JA = 1 

320 JB = 3:KD = 0:C = 0:HK = 0:SC = 0:TC = 

330 FOR I = 15 TO STEP -1 

340 VTAB 21:HTAB 22:PRINT I;" " 

350 IF TC < 9 THEN TC = TC+liGOTO 370 

360 TC = 0:SC = SC+1:VTAB 21:HTAB 33:PR1NT SC 

370 IF C > 1 THEN 440 

380 IF C = 1 THEK JA = 1:G0T0 400 

390 IF PEEK (-16384) = 202 OR PEEK (-16384) = 234 THEN P 

OKE -16368,0:C = 8:JA = 4 

400 HCOLOR= 4:DRAW JB AT 130,70 

410 HCOLOR= 3:DRAH JA AT 130,70 

420 JB = JA:JA = JA+1-3*(JA = 3) 

430 IF JA < 3 THEN A = PEEK<S):A = PEEKCS) 

440 IF C > THEN C = C-1 

450 FOR DE = 1 TO 5+20*KO+10*COL > 0):NEXT DE 

460 IF DL > THEN OL = DL-1:GOT0 350 

470 HC0L0R= 4:DRAW HB AT P8,98 

480 PA = PA-3-INT(RNDC1)*23:IF PA <= 63 THEN 520 

490 IF NOT KD AND PA < 200 AND PA > 60 AND PEEK(234) < 

> 4 THEN KO = 1:IF KD THEN HA = 6:HK = HK+1:SC = SC+IN 

TCRNDC1>*4)+1 

500 HCOLOR= 3:DRAU HA AT PA,98 

510 PB = PA:HB = HA: GOTO 350 

520 HA = 5:KD = 0:PA = 21S:NEXT I 

530 TEXT:HOME:C = 1:F0R I = 1 TO 3 

540 IF SC > HDCI) THEN C = C+1 

550 NEXT I:Ce$ = CHSCC) 

560 IF C < 4 THEN H0$ = AWS(C):MD(C) = SC 

570 PRINT "WELL, ";N$;", HERE ARE THE RESULTS." 

580 PRINT: PRINT "ALL AROUND, IT WAS A ";C6$ 

590 PRINT "RUN, YOU KNOCKED DOWN ";HK 

600 PRINT "HURDLE(S), WITH A TOTAL TIHE OF ";SC 

610 PRINT "SECONDS.": PRINT: IF SC > PZ THEN 630 

620 PZ = SC:PR1NT "THAT'S A NEW PERSONAL BEST!":PRINT 

630 IF C = 4 THEN 650 

640 PRINT "YOU WIN A ";MD$;" HEDAL!" 

650 PRINT: PRINT "PRESS <Q> TO QUIT, OR ANY OTHER" 

660 PRINT "KEY TO RUN AGAIN."; 

670 GET K$:IF K$ <> "Q" AND ASCCKS) <> 113 THEN 140 

680 END 

1000 DATA 6,0,14,0,31,0,47,0,62,0,80,0,84,0 

1010 DATA 37,55,54,54,45,62,158,219,44,44,44 

1020 DATA 28,35,45,45,4,0 

1030 DATA 37,55,54,54,45,54,230,59,47,37,36 

1040 DATA 220,44,45,37,0 

1050 DATA 37,55,62,58,45,46,39,55,54,62 

1060 DATA 55,44,53,46,0 

1070 DATA 36,37,55,62,63,45,45,45,63,55,54 

1080 DATA 63,55,44,45,45,37,0 

1090 DATA 47,36,4,0 

1100 DATA 52,45,45,0 

2000 DATA NEAR PERF£CT,GftEAT,GO0D,FAIR 

2010 DATA GOLD,SILVEfi,BRONZE 



Atari 400, 800, 600XL, 800XL, & 130XE w/ASK 
RAM/Happx Hufdier 

10 POKE 106,PEEK(106)-17:GRAPHICS 

20 POKE 106,PEEK(106)+17:PRINT CHR$(125) 

30 POKE 106,PEEKC106)-17 

40 DIM PMC5),«D(3),B$(20),F$C20),N$<9) 

50 DIM MD$(6),CG$<12),AW${16),CH$C25),SPC4,4) 

60 PB=1000:HD (1)^80 

70 SETCOLOR 1,0,15:SETCOLOR 2,0,0 

80 FOR 1=2 TO 3;MD(I)=HDCI-1)+2+INTtRNDC0)*2> 

90 NEXT I 

100 FS=CHR$C160):FS(20)=F$:FS(2>=FS 

110 6S=CHRSC32) :B$(20}=BS:BSC2>=B$ 

120 PH<1)=PEEK(106)+1:PK<2)=PM(1)+4:PHC3)=PH<2)+4 

130 P«(5)=PM<3)+4:PHC4)=PM(2) 

140 FOR 1=1 TO 3:Q=PH(D*2S6+542:F0R J=Q TO 0+23 

150 READ A:POKE J,A;NEXT J:NEXT I 

160 a=PM(5)*256+542:F0R 1=8 TO Q+13 

170 READ A:POKE I,A:NEXT I 

180 a=PMC1)*256:F0R 1=1 TO 3:READ OF,NB 

190 FOR J=0F TO OF+NB:READ A 

200 FOR K=Q TO Q+3072 STEP 1024 

210 IF I01 OR KOQ+3072 OR J<0F+7 THEN POKE K+J,A 

220 NEXT K:NEXT J: NEXT I 

230 FOR 1=1 TO 4: READ CG$:SP(I,1>=LEN<CH$)+1 

240 CHSCSPCI,1))=CGS:SPCI,2)=LEN{CH$):NEXT I 

250 FOR 1=1 TO 3: READ M0$:SP(I,3)=LEN(AWS5+1 

260 AW$CSPCI,3))=HD$;SP(I,4)=LENtAW$):NEXT 1 

270 POKE S59,46:P0KE 53277,3 

280 FOR 1=0 TO 2:P0KE S32S6+l' 1 :NEXT I 

290 FOR 1=0 TO 3: READ A: POKE 704+1, A: NEXT I 

300 FOR 1=1536 TO 1562:READ A:POKE I,A:NEXT I 

310 A=USRC1536) 

320 PRINT "WELCOME, CONTESTANT. WHAT'S" 

330 PRINT "YOUR NAME"; 

340 INPUT N$:IF N$="" THEN 320 

350 PRINT CHR$C125):POKE 752,1 

360 POSITION 11,0:PRINT "PRESS <S> TO START." 

370 POSITION 10,2:PRINT F$:POSITION 10,10:PRINT FS 

380 FOR 1=2 TO 10:POSITION 6,I:PRINT F$<1,4) 

390 POSITION 30,I:PRINT F$C1,4):NEXT I 

400 POSITION 11,14;PR1NT "PRESS <J> TO JUMP." 

410 POSITION 10,16:PRINT "*THE TIMES TO BEAT*" 

420 POSITION 10,17:PRINT " " 

430 POSITION 14,18:PRINT "GOLD: ";HDC1) 

440 POSITION 14,19:PRINT "SILVER: ";MDC2) 

450 POSITION 14,20:PRINT "BRONZE: ";MD(3) 

460 IF PB=1000 THEN 490 

470 POSITION 9-LEN(N$)/2,22 

480 PRINT N$;"'S PERSONAL BEST; ";PB 

490 POKE 54279,PM(2):P0KE 53248,115 

500 POKE 53249, 115:P0KE 623,1:P0KE 764,255 

510 IF PEEK(764)<>62 THEN 510 

520 POSITION 11,0:PRINT BS 

530 POSITION 2,0: PRINT "HURDLES LEFT; ";HL 

540 POSITION 30,0: PRINT "TIHE:" 

550 POKE 764,255: POKE 203,0: POKE 20,0 

560 DL=50:PH=160:PJ=1:KD=0:C=0:HK=0 

570 FOR 1=15 TO STEP -1 

580 POSITION 16,0:PRINT I;" " 

590 POSITION 36,0:PRINT PEEKt203) 

600 POKE 53278,0: IF C>1 THEN 650 

610 IF C=1 THEN 630 

620 IF PEEK(764)=1 THEN POKE 764,255:C=7:P0KE 54279,PH 

(5):G0T0 650 

630 POKE 54279,PHCPJ) 

640 IF PJ=1 OR PJ=3 THEN SOUND 0,121, 8,15:S0UND 0,0,0, 

9 

650 FOR DE=1 TO RND(0)*3+6*KD+10*<DL>a):NEXT DE 
660 PJ=PJ+1-4*CPJ=4) 
670 POSITION 36,0:PRINT PEEK(203) 
680 IF C>« THEN C=C-1 
690 IF DL>0 THEN DL=DL-1:G0T0 590 
700 POKE 53250+KD,PH 

710 IF NOT KD THEN KD=(PEEKC53262)=1 ) :IF KD THEN POKE 
53250,0 : HK=HK+1 : POK E 203,PEEK ( 203) +2 



64 FAMILY COMPUTING 



eS- 



Recognized as the authoritative source tor micro users! 

WE SHOW YOU HOW TO GET 
THE MOST FROM YOUR COMPUTER 




MAKING I 

MONEY 

MICROCOMPUTER 



• Superior Selections 

• Practical Prices 



Business Success 
Personal Achievement 



Select 5 Books 
for Only *2 




1. 

2. 
3. 



7 very good reasons to join 
The Computer Book Club® 







SOFTWARK 




Big Savings. Save 20% to 75% on books sure to increase your com- 
puter know-how 

No-Risk Guarantee. All books returnable within 10 days without 

obligation 

Ciub News Bullotins. All about current selections— mains, alternates, 

extras— plus bonus offers. Comes 13 times a year with hundreds of 
- up-to-the-minute titles you can pick from 
4i "Automatic Order." Do nothing and the Main selection will be 

shipped automatically! But . . . if you want an Alternate selection— or 

no books at all— we'll follow the instructions you give on the reply 
_ form provided with every News Bulletin 

5 . Bonus Books. Immediately gel a Dividend Certificate with every book 
_ purchased and qualify for big discounts of 60% to 80% 
D. Extra Bonuses. Take advantage of added-value promotions, plus 
_ special discounts 
/. Exceptional Quality. All books are first-rate publisher's editions 

selected by our Editorial Board and filled with useful up-to-the- minute 

information ' ' 

• Your only obljgatlon Is to purchase 4 or more books at regular Club Prices (plus shipping/handling) during the next 12 months. 
If card is missing use this address to join: The Computer Book Club, P. 0. Box 80. Dept FAMC-186, Blue Ridge Summit, PA 17214 




FREE 

when you 
join now! 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 53 








F 




R 



SORE 



E Y E 



THOMSON 



To those of you who stare and stare— and stare 
at computers, blessed reiief has arrived. Thomson "■■ 
monitors. We promise clearer, crisper resoiution, 
remarkable colors and print-like text. Thomson builds 
a full line of monitors, from basic monochrome to high- 
resolution color models. All are designed to fulfill your 
needs today, and sophisticated enough to fulfill your 
needs in the future. 

Thomson monitors are designed and btiilt by Thonison, 
a $6 billion international corporation. They're going to 
change the way America looks at computers. 

Ask vour local computer dealer for aThomson 
monitor, or call 1-213-821-2995, ext. 38, for the Thomson 
dealer nearest you.Then take a stare at aThomson 
monitor. It's a sight for sore eyes."' 

Ttirs :i7aei.'l Tl».ni-iiii i» a irailmtirk ul ■niiiiii--.)n S .\, 



s 





'■ « 


■f 


Iffjlfl 


^H FOl^u/llG: ti iiiafAl J ' ' H ■ ■ 




I^.-~= - 


.^ 



M"dil t M :tlillSI. IL'-dtaw «.il. -Ilmni An pilch 
KCHI i.yiJf>r monitor wiih irxl s^witirh ann 



THOMSON ^ 



©1985 ThoTLson Consumer Products Corporation 



ARCADE GAME 



729 PH=PH-2-INTCRNDC(J)*4):IF PH>75 THEN 590 

750 K[)=0:PH=16fl:NEXT I:SC=PEEK(203) 

740 POKE 623,4:PRINT CHRS(125) 

750 C=1:F0R 1=1 TO 3 

760 IF SOHDd) THEN C=C+1 

770 NEXT 1:IF C<>4 THEN HDCC)=SC 

7S0 CG$=C«S(SP(C,1),SPCC,2)) 

790 IF C<4 THEN HD(C)=SC:HD$=AW$(SPCC,3),SPCC,4)) 

800 PRINT "WELL, ";N$;", HERE ARE THE RESULTS." 

810 PRINT :PR1NT "ALL AROUND, IT WAS A ";CG$ 

820 PRINT "RUN. YOU KNOCKED DOWN ";HK 

830 PRINT "HURDLECS), WITH A TOTAL TIME OF "; SC 

840 PRINT "SECONDS. ":PRiNT ;IF SOPB THEN 860 

850 PB=SC:PRINT "THAT'S A NEW PERSONAL BEST!":PRINT 

860 IF C=4 THEN 880 

870 PRINT "YOU WIN A ";MD$;" MEDAL!":PRINT 

880 PRINT :PRINT "PRESS <Q> TO QUIT, OR ANY OTHER" 

890 PRINT "KEY TO RUN AGAIN."; 

900 POKE 764,255 

910 IF PEEKC7645=255 THEN 910 

920 IF PEEKC764)<>47 THEN 350 

930 POKE 53277,0:POKE 623,4:P0KE 559,34 

940 POKE 106,PEEK(106)+17:GRAPHICS 

1000 DATA 48,48,56,48,32,0,64,144,144,144 

1010 DATA 144,158,128,0,0,0,46,34,34,226 

1020 DATA 131,128,128,0 

1030 DATA 48,48,56,48,32,0,0,32,32,32 

1040 DATA 40,16,8,0,0,0,48,48,48,48 

1050 DATA 80,80,80,120 

1060 DATA 48,48,56,48,32,0,32,64,128,142 

1070 DATA 128,128,128,128,0,28,4,36,36,228 

1080 DATA 135,128,128,128 

1090 DATA 24,24,28,24,22,32,60,0,1,1 

1100 DATA 1,15,224,128 

1110 DATA 675,11,48,48,48,48,48,48,48,48,48 

1120 DATA 48,48,48,815,6,64,64,64,64,64,64,192 

1130 DATA 948,1,64,127 

2000 DATA NEAR PERFECT, GREAT,GOOD, FAIR 

2010 DATA GOLD,SILVER,BRONZE 



3000 DATA 90,255,15,15 

4000 DATA 104,162,6,160,11,169,6,32,92,228 
4010 DATA 96,216,165,20,201,60,208,6,230,203 
4020 DATA 169,0,133,20,76,95,228 

Cemmedore 64 & 12S (C 64 mpdel/Happjr Hurdler 

10 POKE 55,0:POKE 56,62:CLR 

20 bin HD(3),PJ(5),CH$(4),AW$C3) 

30 V=53248:S=54272:A=248:PB=1000:HDC1)=87 

40 PJ(1)=1:PJt2)=2:PJC3)=4:PJC45=2:PJ(5)=8 

50 POKE V+21,0:POKE 53281, 15:P0KE 53280,15 

60 PRINT CHR$(147);CHR$(144> 

70 FOR 1=15872 TO 16384: POKE 1,0: NEXT I 

80 FOR 1=0 TO SiREAD 0F,BT:K=15872+I*64+0F 

90 FOR J=K TO K+BT:REAO HiPOKE J,M:NEXT J, I 

100 FOR 1=2040 TO 2045:POKE I,A:A=A+1 :N£XT I 

110 FOR 1=0 TO 11:REA0 H:POKE V+I,M:NEXT I 

120 FOR 1=1 TO 6:F0R J=39 TO 44:P0KE V+J,10:NEXT J, I 

130 POKE V+37,1:P0KE V+38,3 

140 POKE V+23,15:P0KE V+28,63:P0KE V+29,15 

150 FOR I=S TO S+13:REA0 H:POKE I,H:NEXT I 

160 FOR 1=1 TO 4:READ CMSCDjNEXT I 

170 FOR 1=1 TO 3:READ AW$(I):NEXT I 

180 FOR 1=2 TO 3:MDCI)=MD(I-1)+2+INT(RND(1J*2):N£XT I 

190 T$=CHR$C151)+CHfi$C18>:STS="" 

200 FOR 1=1 TO 23:T$=T$+CHRSC99):NEXT I 

210 FOR 1=1 TO 20:STS=ST$+" ":NEXT I 

220 PRINT "WELCOME, CONTESTANT. WHAT'S" 

230 INPUT "YOUR NAME"; N$: IF N$="" THEN 220 

240 IF LEN<N$)>7 THEN N$=LEFT$<N$,7) 

250 PRINT CHR$(147);CHR$(1S8) 

260 POKE 53281, 12:P0KE 53280,3 

270 POKE 214,11 :PRINT TABC103;"PRESS <S> TO START"; 

280 FOR 1=2 TO 8:P0KE 214,I:PRINT 

290 PRINT TAB(7);T$;:NEXT I:PRINT CHRS(5) 

300 PRINT TAB(50);"PRESS <J> TO JUMP" 

310 PRINT CHR$C144);TAB(89V'*THE TIMES TO BEAT*":PR1NT 

320 Q=MD(1):G0SUB 1000 

330 PRINT TABC12);"G0LD: ";H$;":";S$ 

340 Q=M0(2):G0SUB 1000 -■ » 



Give your computer a robot 
to play v\^ith. 




Now you and your computer can 
team and have fun at the same time. The 
fischertechnik Robotic Computing Kit lets you 
__ explore the exciting field o( robotics and computer 

control with 10 different and challenging projects. Projects that 
will expand not only your knowledge but your imagination as well. 

The fischertechnik Robotic Computing Kit" is designed so you start 
oil by building a simple computer-controlled traffic signal project and 
work up to a complex solar tracking system. Simple, clearly defined 
BASIC programs on a diskette make it easy. The kit also comes with 
easy-to-understand building instructions and wiring plans for each 
project. So you'll get it right from start to finish. When you complete 



the 10 basic projects, you'll have enough knowledge to develop furtiter 
models and programs on your own. With the fischertechnik Robotic 
Computing Kit. the possibilities are endless. 
For more information on the fischertechnik Robotic Computing Kit, 
contact your nearest fischertechnik dealer or call 201-227-9283. 
fischer America. Inc., 175 Route 46 West, Fairfield, NJ 07006. 
■AvailaOle now for Apple* II. ll + , lie, and compatitiies: Commodore* VIC 20 
and C64. IBM* and more to come, 




c;cT^/■^^^,TT^?'^a 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 19 



ARCADE GAME 




350 PRINT TABn2);"SILVER: ";H$;":";S$ 

360 Q=HD(3):G0SUB 10M 

370 PRINT TABC12);"BR0NZE: ";H$;":";S$ 

3S0 IF PB=ieO0 THEN 418 

390 PRINT TAB(8-LEN<N$)/25;NS;"'S PERSONAL BEST: "; 

400 Q=P8:G0SUB 1000:PRINT H$;":";S$ 

410 POKE V+21,2 

420 GET K$:IF K$<>"S" THEN 420 

430 PRINT CHR$C19);TABC4);"TIKE: "; 

440 PRINT TAB<18);"HURC>LES LEFT:" 

450 DL=20: PH=255 : J=1 : KD=0: C=0: SC=0: HK=0: TIS="000000" 

460 POKE S+24,15:F0R 1=15 TO STEP -1 

470 PRINT CHRS(19);TABC31);STR$Ci);" " 

480 PRINT CHR$C19);TABC10);MID$CTI$,4,1);":";RI6HT$(TI 

$,2) 

490 HL=-CDL=0)*(16+16*KD) 

500 IF C=1 THEN J=1:G0T0 520 

510 GET K$:IF C=0 AND K$="J" THEN C=9:J=5 

520 POKE V+21,PJ(J> OR HL 

530 FOR DE=1 TO 3ffl*KD-10*CDLXt) :NEXT DE 

540 IF J=1 OR J=3 AND C=0 THEN POKE S+4,129:P0KE S+4,1 

28 

550 IF C=0 THEN J=J+1+4*CJ=4) 

560 IF C>« THEN C=C-1 

570 IF DL>0 THEN DL=DL-1:G0T0 480 

580 POKE V+8,PH:P0KE V+10,PH 

590 IF KD=0 AND (PEEK(V+30) AND 16>=16 THEN KD=1:HK=HK 

+1 

600 PH=PH-4-INT(RND(1)*4):IF PH>80 THEN 480 

610 POKE V+8,255:KD=0;PH=255:NEXT I 

620 POKE V+21,0:PRINT CHRSC147); 

630 POKE 5328fl,15:POKE 53281,15 

640 SC=VAL(RIGHT$CTI$,2))+VAL(HID$(TI$,3,2))*60 

650 C=1:F0R 1=1 TO 3 

660 IF SOHOd) THEN C=C+1 

670 NEXT I:IF C<4 THEN MD(C)=SC:HD$=AU$CC) 

680 CGS=CHSCC) 

690 PRINT "WELL, ";N$;", HERE ARE THE RESULTS." 

700 PRINT: PRINT "ALL AROUND, IT WAS A ";CG$ 

710 PRINT "RUN. YOU KNOCKED DOWN";HK 

720 PRINT "HURDLECS), WITH A TOTAL TIME OF" 

730 a=SC:GOSUB 1000:PRINT M$;":";SS;"." 

740 PRINT: IF SOPB THEN 760 

750 PB=SC:PRINT "THAT'S A NEW PERSONAL 8EST!":PRINT 

760 IF C=4 THEN 780 

770 PRINT "YOU WIN A ";MD$;" MEDAL!" 

780 PRINT: PRINT "PRESS <Q> TO QUIT, OR ANY OTHER" 

790 PRINT "KEY TO RUN AGAIN."; 

800 GET K$:IF K$="" THEN 800 

810 IF K$<>"Q" THEN 250 

820 END 

1000 HN=INT<a/60):S£=Q-HN*60:H$=STR$CHN):S$=STR$CSE) 

1010 M$=«ID$CH$,2,LENCH$)-1):S$=MID$CS$,2,LENCS$)-1) 

1020 RETURN 

2000 DATA 13,49,40,0,0,42,0,0,40,0,0,56,0,0,21 

2010 DATA 0,0,21,0,2,153,0,2,22,0,0,21,160 

2020 DATA 0,63,0,0,63,128,0,63,128,0,60,128 

2030 DATA 0,32,128,1,160,128,1,0,128,0,0,80 

2040 DATA 13,49,40,0,0,42,0,0,40,0,0,56,0 

2050 DATA 0,21,0,0,21,32,0,169,160,0,149,0,0 

2060 DATA 149,0,0,63,0,0,63,0,0,63,0,0,10 

2070 DATA 0,0,10,0,0,26,0,0,18,0,0,1,64 

2080 DATA 13,47,40,0,0,42,0,0,40,0,0,56,0,0,21,0,0 

2090 DATA 21,32,0,154,160,2,21,0,2,21,0,0 

2100 DATA 63,0,0,63,160,0,63,160,0,60,64,0,32 

2110 DATA 0,0,160,0,2,128,0,1,13,35,40,0 

2120 DATA 0,42,0,0,40,0,0,56,0,0,21,0,0,21 

2130 DATA 0,10,154,168,0,21,0,0,21,0,0,63,1 

2140 DATA 26,191,169,26,191,169,16 

2150 DATA 24,36,16,0,0,20,0,0,20,0,0,20 

2160 DATA 0,0,20,0,0,20,0,0,4,0,0,4,0,0,4 

2170 DATA 0,0,4,0,0,4,0,0,4,0,0,84 

2180 DATA 42,20,20,0,0,20,0,0,20,0,0,20,0,0,20 

2190 DATA 1,84,21,85,80,21,85,80 

3000 DATA 140,80,140,80,140,80,140,72,0,101,0,101 

4000 DATA 135,33,0,0,0,17,49,163,7,0,0,0,51,67 

5000 DATA NEAR PERFECT,6REAT,600D,FAIR 

5010 DATA SOLD,SILVER,BRONZE 



Upcoming 
Features 



FAMILY 
COMPUTING 

A Buyer's Guide to the Best 
Graphics Software for You 

How Your Computer at 
Home Can Help with Work 
at the Office 



A Great New Way 
to Find Data On-Line 

Games for Beginners 

Your Computer Can Help 
Your Child Write 
Better School Reports. 
Find Out How. 



Tax Software — ^Does it Really 
Ease the Process? 



February Issue 
on Sale at Your 
Newsstand 
January 2 1 



^ 



68 FAMILY COMPUTING 



Earth will be destroyed in 12 minutes 
to make way for a hyperspace bypass. 

Should you hitchhike into the next galaxy? 

Or stay and drink beer? 



SKp the disk in vom- computer and sucldenlv vou ai-e 
Aithiu- Dent, the dubious liero of THE HlfCHHIIffiR'S 
GUIDE TO THE GALAXY, a side-spHttiiigmastenvork 
of interacti\'e fiction by novelist Douglas Adams and 
Infocom's Ste\'e Meretziq-. And eveiy decision you 
make\\ill shape the ston-'s outcome. Suppose for 
instance you decide to linger in the pub. You simply 
tjqie, in plain English: 

>DRINK THE BEER 
And the stoiy resjMnds: 

YDU GET DRUNK AND HAUE A TER- 
RIFIC TIME FDR TWELUE MINUTES. 
ARE THE LIFE AND SDUL OF 
THE PUB> THEY ALL 
CLAP YOU ON 
THE BACK ,.„ . .^ 




AND 
TELL YOU 
_ WHAT A GREAT 
CHAP YDU ARE AND 
THEN THE EARTH GETS 
UNEXPECTEDLY DEMOLISHED. YOU 
WAKE UP NITH A HfiNGOMER WHICH LASTS 
FDR ALL ETERNITY, YOU HAUE DIED. 

Suppose, on the other hand, you decide to: 

>E>(IT THE MILEAGE PUB THEN GD NORTH 

In that case you'll be off on the most raind-bogglinglv? 
hilai-ious adventiu-e any eaithling ever had. 

You communicate -and the stoiy responds -in M 
sentences. So at eveiy turn, you have literally thousands 
of alternatives. If you decide it might be wise, for 
ijistance, to wrap a towel ai'ound youi- head, just say so: 



>WRAP THE TOWEL AROUND NY HEAD 

And the stoiy responds: 

THE RA'.'ENQUS BUGBLATTER BEAST OF 
TRAAL IS COMPLETELY BEWILDERED. 
IT IS SD DIM IT THINKS IF YOU CAN'T 
SEE IT. IT CAN'T SEE YDU. 

Simply staying alive from one zany situa- 
tion to the next will requii'e eveiy proton of 
puz2de soKing prowess youi" mere mortal 
mind can muster. So put down 
that beer and hitchhike 
down to yom' local 
softwai'e store today. 
Before they put that 
bypass in. 




ACfj?f 




Homi'^ ^-umiiit'te with Peril ,Se(\?iiive 
Sunj.'l:i?sc.s Li Mitrnscipific ^fiue Fleet, 
a DUNT i'ANlC Bimon. a IHcktge of 
MullipuritOhe Fluff anil orders forthe 
■ ^tniction of your home anfl planet. 




inpocom 

For more information call 1-800-262-6868. Or write to us 
at 125 CambridgePark Drive, Cambridge, ^U 02140. 



Othei' interacth'e science fiction .storie? from Infocom, 
£1985 Infocom, Inc. THE HiTCHHIKEE'S GUI DF, TOTHF, GALAXY is alrademark of Douglas Adams. PLANETFALL, STARCROSS, SUSPENDED md AMINO FOREVEE VOYAGING m Iradmarks of INFOCOM, liK. 

CIRCLE READER SERVICE 24 



PRODUCTIVITY PROGRAM 



PROGRAMMING P.S. 

Corrections to previous months' programs 



Get 'Em CMovember 1985, page 66} 
Atari: Please change line 410 to read as follows: 

4la POSITION 10,e:PRINT S; SP$; SPS; : SOUND lJ,X,10,8 

Super Save (November 1 955, page 90) 

Alar! 600/eOOXL & 130XE: This program 
works fine on the Atari 400 and 8O0, but on the 
600XL. 800XL, and 130XE it will not handle errors cor- 
rectly. Below is a version compatible with all Ataris; how- 
ever, the program we published in November works bet- 
ter on the 400 and 800 than this one does. 
10 FOR 1=1536 TO 1657:READ A:POKE I,A:NEXT I 
1»a« DATA 134,168,24,42,133,203,186,138,101,203 
1*19 DATA 133,203,192,5,208,94,134,208,91,104 
1020 DATA 240,88,201,7,176,84,10,10,10,10 
1030 DATA 170,104,208,76,157,75,3,104,201,4 
1040 DATA 240,4,201,8,208,64,157,74,3,104 
1050 DATA 157,69,3,104,157,68,3,169,3,157 
1060 DATA 66,3,32,86,228,48,45,189,74,3 
1070 DATA 9,3,157,66,3,104,157,69,3,104 
1080 DATA 157,68,3,104,157,73,3,104,157,72 
1090 DATA 3,32,86,228,43,16,169,12,157,66 
1100 DATA 3,32,86,228,48,6,160,0,240,2 
1110 DATA 160,175,169,0,133,213,132,212,166,203 
1120 DATA 154,96 

To call this version of Super Save from Atari BASIC, 
you still use the expression 

A=USR(1536,I0CB,0P,ADR<"D: FILENAME"), START,BYTES 

where iocb (the number of the I/O channel you wish to 
use) is between 1 and 6; op is 8 (to save) or 4 (to load); 
FILENAME is the filename you want to save or load from; 
STAFiT is the address of the beginning of the area of mem- 
ory you want to save or load; and bytes is the length of 
that area. 

After executing the above expression, the value of vari- 
able "A" will be zero If everj'thjng went OK. "A"will equal 
175 if you made a mistake in one of Super Save's parame- 
ters. Finally, if executing the routine caused a DOS error 
(for example, if Super Save couldn't find the file you 
asked it to load), "a" will equal the normal BASIC error 
code for whatever error occurred. 

To demonstrate this feature, you can add lines 35 and 
65 to the demo program: 

35 IF AO0 THEN PRINT "ERROR ";A;" HAS OCCURRED.": STOP 
65 IF AO0 THEN PRINT "ERROR ";A;" HAS OCCURRED.": STOP 

Wordcount {Deeember 1985, page 61) 

IBM PC & compatibles w/disk drive: Please change 
line 120 to read as follows: 

120 AL=(CH>64 AND CH<91) OR <CH>96 AND CH<123) OR (CH> 
47 AND CH<58) OR CH=39 




Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reggae {Deeember 1985, 
page 84} 

Commodore 64 & 128 (C 64 mode): Please change 
lines 1000-1010 to read as follows: 
1W« DATA 0,0,0,0,0,28,100,0,0,0,0,0,28 
1010 DATA 100,0,0,0,0,0,28,123,0,0,0,15 
Then, add line 195: 
195 POKE S+11,33:P0KE S+18,33 

IBM PC & compatibles: Were sorry, but since this 
song is arranged for three voices. It will not run on the 
IBM PC. 



HOME 

INFORMATION 

MANAGER 

PutYour Files on 
a Floppy Disk with 

This AAini-Dota-Base 
Program for 

the IBM PaPC/r 



PROGRAM BY STEVEN CM. CHEN 
INTRODUCTION BY LANCE PAAVOLA 



Since publishing the Com- 
modore 64 and Apple ver- 
sions of Home Information 
Manager, we've been be- 
sieged with requests from 
readers for translations for 
other computers. So, this 
month, we're presenting an 
IBM versionqf the program. 

Home Iriformation Man- 
ager is an electronic filing 
program that helps you 
gather files onto a slim, 
neat, portable disk, and 
print out a hard copy 
whenever you want. Try it 
if you're not ready to buy a 
commercial data-base pro- 
gram yet. Maybe you're un- 
sure whether storing your 
records electronically 
makes sense, or all you 
think you'll want to com- 
puterize is your 100-name 
Christmas card list. It may 
lake a while to type in, but 
when you're finished, it's a 
program you can use every 
day. You can pinpoint a 
particular piece of informa- 
tion without having to 
thumb through it all. You 
can make changes without 



mess. And you can consoli- 
date all your files in one 
place. 

THE FIRST STEPS 

Begin by carefully typing 
in and SAVEing the pro- 
gram. fSee Tips to the 
Typist, page 56, for help 
with typing in programs.) 
You may also wish to save 
a second (backup) copy of 
the program on a separate 
disk at this time. Before 
you RUN the program, make 
sure your printer (if you 
have one) is connected and 
turned on. 

Don't be discouraged if 
the program doesn't run 
the first time; with such a 
long program, you're 
bound to make typing er- 
rors. LIST it on the printer 
and proofread carefully. 
When you've got the pro- 
gram running, save the fi- 
nal version and make a 
backup. 

You can save your own 
data on the same disk as 
your working copy of Home 
Iriformation Manager. If 
you prefer to keep your 



:S^ 



70 FAMILY COMPUTING 




A Video Kids 
Jumi) UP And ^ovwn For 







7i!ii,c!a:&A»»^ 




ABC FUN FIT 

with Mary Lou Retton 
An Exercise videocassette 
Just For Kids 



Who better than Mary Lou Retton 
to show your kids how fitness 
can be fun. Easy-To-Follow 
routines iilce Rhythm Rockers, 
Spine Tingiers, Rock Easy • No 
Bounce Floor Stretch and more, 
feature over 50 Super-Charged 
Exercises! Remember, better 
physical conditioning leads to 
greater seif-confidence and 
healthy bodies make sharper 
minds. ABC FUN fit also features 
highlights of luiary Lou's 
unprecedented gold medal 
winning gymnastic perform- 
ances so the whole family will 
enjoy watching. 



order your Mary Lou Retton 
ABC FUN FIT Video with Mary 
LOU Retton today! Give 
someone you love a chance 
to CO For The Cold! 

call TOll-Free 1-800-325-6143 
(in Missouri 1-800-392-2179 

or send the coupon below 
to: Scholastic, inc. 
2931 E. Mccarty St., 

P.O. BOX 7502 

Jefferson City, MO 65102 



Please send me 

ABC FUN FIT with Mary Lou Retton video (#UZ212) 

at $29.95 + $1.47 shipping and handling. 

send □ VHS n beta 

n Mv check or money order Is enclosed. 

a Charge my □ visa d masterowd 

Credit card # 

Expiration Date: -^ 

Signature: . ^ 

Name (please print): 

streetAddress: 

City. State, zip code: 



Exclusively DIstrlOuted by KarlLorlmar Home video 



Mall to: scholastic inc.. 2931 E. IVIcCarty St., 
P.O. BOX 7502, Jefferson City, mo 65102 



PRODUCYIVITY PROGRAM 




data on separate disks, get 
the disks now, format 
them, and label appropri- 
ately (e.g., MOM. DAD, JODY: 
or FINANCIAL, PERSONAL). 

Before you transfer im- 
portant records to your 
Home Injormalion Man- 
ager disks, test the pro- 
gram by creating a few- 
sample flleboxes and filling 
in some info. When you're 
confident you've located 
any remaining typing er- 
rors, and have a good idea 
of how the program oper- 
ates, you're ready to start 
using it in earnest. 

A COMPUTERIZED FILEBOX 

To make Home Injorma- 
tion Manager easy to 
learn, we've designed It to 
work just like a recipe box 
filled with index cards. You 
can have as many "file- 
boxes" as will fit on your 
disks. 

Since youTl usually put 
different kinds of informa- 
tion on each line of every 
index card, you should as- 
sign a name to each line to 
remind you of what goes 
where. For example, for a 
catalog of your books (or 
books you've borrowed or 
lent}, you might label the 
first line aitthor; the sec- 
ond, TITLE; the third, pub- 
usher: the fourth, date: 
the fifth, SUBJECT for gener- 
al subject area; and the 
sixth, LOCATION for where 
it's shelved or who bor- 
rowed it. 

Once you've typed In in- 
formation about your 
books (choice two on the 
menu], you can print out a 
catalog of your library 
(choice four); add new 
books as you acquire them 
(choice two) and remove 
ones you've disposed of 
(choice three); change any 
entry (e.g., change the lo- 
cation of a book from den 
to BEDROOM — choice three 
again); or display or print 
out the information about 
a particular book or all the 
books on a given subject 
(also choice three). 

Choice six lets you store 
the filebox you're working 
on (all cards and the card 
format) on disk; bring a 
.new one into memory from 



disk; and remove (erase) a 
filebox. Choice five displays 
the names of all the file- 
boxes you've saved on 
disk. 

lASr TO USE 

For the most part, it will 
be obvious how to use the 
program, and you'll quickly 
learn how to use even the 
more obscure features 
(with a little experimenta- 
tion). Here are some gener- 
al principles; 

1. When to press ENTER 
(the *-' key on the IBM PC). 
When you see a menu and 
the SELECTION — prompt, or 
when you're asked for a 
line number, just press the 
number key for the option 
or line you want. You'll go 
directly there without hav- 
ing to press ENTER . But 
whenever you're asked to 
type in something longer 
than one character — a card 
number, say. or a line 
name — the program waits 
for you to press Enter to 
Indicate you're done. 

2. Moiling Back Up 
Through the Menus. If you 
ever get lost in the pro- 
gram, decide you don't 
want the choice you just 
made after all, or have fin- 
ished with an option, you 
can always press the ESC 
key. This will take you to 
the previous menu at any 
time (except when you're 
reading from, or writing 
onto, a disk), even when 
you're in the middle of typ- 
ing in a line. 

3. Built-in Editor. When 
you see a backwards arrow 
['■-} and a blinking cursor, 
you are using the built-in 
editor subprogram. You 
can then type in and edit a 
line of text. It will let you 
make changes in the line 
until you press ENTER . 

You are always in "insert 
mode": that is, any charac- 
ter you type will be insert- 
ed in the line at the cur- 
sor's position. The left and 
right cursor keys move the 
cursor within the line; the 
DEL key deletes the charac- 
ter under the cursor. 

A FEW HINTS 

Remembering these few 
key points will make using 



the program easier; 

1. When designing a 
card format, make sure 
you allow space for all the 
lines you might need (up 
to a maximum of nine). 
Once you start adding 
cards to the filebox, you 
can't add or delete lines 
without losing all the cards 
in memory. (You can 
change the names of exist- 
ing lines, though,) 

2. Since there's no sort 
function to rearrange your 
cards in alphabetic or nu- 
meric order, you should 
type in your information in 
the order you want it to 
appear. You can add a card 
in the middle, but you 
have to wait for the com- 
puter to shift all the other 
cards back. 

3. When you choose Dis- 

I'LAV/CHANCE/liEMOVE Or 

PRINT and then work with 

(or print) SELECTED CARDS, 

you're given two choices. 

MATCH FROM BEGINNING OF 

LINE checks to sec if a line 
begins with the characters 
you've specified, search 
WHOLE LINE looks for those 
characters everywhere 
within a line, but takes 
much longer. For example, 
if you tell the program to 

look for SMITH, SEARCH 

WHOLE LINE would find both 
SMITH, JOE and joe smith: 

M/VTCH FROM BEGINNING OF 

LINE would find only smith. 

JOE. 

Bear in mind that the 
program considers upper- 
case and lowercase letters 
to be different, so a search 
for SMITH would not find 
"Smith" or "smith." 

4. When you PRINT a 
card or cards, they'll be 
printed with a predefined 
format (left margin and 
number of lines skipped 
between cards). You can 
change this predefined for- 
mat by choosing change 
PRINTER OPTIONS from the 
PRINT CARD(S) menu, 

5. The number of cards 
you can add to a filebox is 
determined by the number 
of lines in your card for- 
mat. When you add cardisi, 
you'll see how many cards 
you've used and how many 
more will fit in your cur- 
rent filebox. 



6. Remember to back up 
your disks frequently — cer- 
tainly after every session In 
which you enter a lot of in- 
formation. If you have a 
printer, it's a good idea to 
make a printout of every- 
thing in your flleboxes oc- 
casionally. To be absolutely 
safe, you can print out 
each new index card as 
you add it, then throw out 
your accumulated hard 
copies when you do a mas- 
ter printout of the entire 
file (or when you back up 
the disk). 

MOVING ON 

Home Information Man- 
ager is powerful, taut if you 
use it often you may find 
yourself bumping up 
against some of its limita- 
tions: 

• You can't do complex 
multiple searches (e.g., 
find all the recipes that call 
for both ham and broccoli, 
but not cheese: or all the 
people who sent you 
Christmas cards for two of 
the last three years). 

• You can fit only so 
much onto one index card. 

• Once you've set up a 
card format, you can't add 
more lines or delete exist- 
ing ones without losing all 
the information you've 
typed in. 

• Filebox size is limited 
by how much info will fit 
into memory at once, rath- 
er than by the storage ca- 
pacity of your disk. 

• The program won't 
sort your cards alphabeti- 
cally or numerically. 

• The input and print- 
ing options are fairly ele- 
mentary. 

If, after using Home Iti- 
formation Manager, you 
discover you need some of 
these more advanced fea- 
tures, watch future issues 

of F.'UIILY COMPUTING for a 

look at commercial data- 
base management pro- 
grams. To better under- 
stand how they work, keep 
in mind that what we call 
"flleboxes." commercial 
programs term "files." 
They also refer to index 
cards as "records," and 
"lines " as "fields." 



^ 



72 WMILY COMPUTING 



IBM PC/PC/r* W/128K RAM & disk drive (printer 
optionalj/ffome Iniormation Manager 

This prtigrnm hwa been tested and /aund to it-ork on tlie Jollaunng computers atid 
lidrdware conftgurattons. using the BASIC s skou<tt:lliM PC uJ'Cofor/firapltlcs Munttot 
Adapter or Monof hfiomi? Oisplay and Parallet Printer Adapter. w.DOS 2.0 or lilglier 
and either Disk BASIC D2.00 or Advanced BASIC A2.00. IBM PCjr. u>/Carlrtdoe BASIC 
Jl.OO. 

10 DEF SEG:CLEAR ,SHF«lMrKEY OFF 

20 DIM t>H$C3),F$(9>,M$t7),MH8),SM$(20),Y$C27W),YNJ(1 

),ZS(9) 

30 WIDTH "SCRN;",40:SCRE£N fl,0:LOCATE ,,0 

40 ES=CHRS(27):SP$=CHR$C32);RE$=CHRS(13) 

50 CLS:FT=0:RT=0:CD=SHF00{) 

60 YN$C0)="N":YN$(1}="Y":LH=0:SP=1:PF=0:HF=1 

70 FOR 1=1 TO 7:READ MI(I):NEXT I:TEST$="FILEBOX" 

80 MI(0)=1:FOR 1=1 TO 7:READ T:MI(I+1)=MI(I)+T 

90 FOR J=HI(I) TO «I(I+1)-1:READ SM$(J):NEXT J, I 

100 FOR 1=0 TO 3:READ DM$(n:NEXT I 

110 FOR 1=0 TO 71:READ VrPOKE CI)+I,V:NEXT I 

120 L$=SP$+STRINGS(38,205) 

130 CLS:GOSUB 2S00:GOSUB 2600 

140 GOSUB 2920:PRINT TABC8);"H0ME INFORMATION MANAGER" 

150 GOSUB 2900:PRINT:FOR 1=1 TO 6 

160 PRINT TAB(5>;"<";CHR$a+48);"> ";H$(1);RE$:NEXT I 

170 PfiINT:PRINT TAB(9);"SELECTI0N — >"; 

180 AS="6";G0SUB 2400;MS=VALCK$) :IF K$=ES THEN HS=7 

190 IF (HS03 AND HS04J OR RT>0 THEN 210 

200 GOSUB 3000:PfiINT DMS(3):G0SUB 2200:GOTO 140 

210 ON MS GOTO 220,540,850,990,1310,1400,1830 

220 FL=30:GOSUB 3100:IF K$=E$ THEN 140 

230 A$=niD$(STR$(FT),2):IF SE>2 OR RT<1 THEN 250 

240 GOSUB 3010:GOSUB 2700: IF K$=E$ THEN 220 ELSE RT=0 

250 GOSUB 3010; IF FT=0 AND SE>1 THEN 420 

260 ON SE GOTO 270,350,440,510 

270 GOSUB 3200: IF FT<9 THEN 300 

280 PRINT "A CARD HAS ONLY 9 LINES!" 

290 GOSUB 2200: GOTO 220 

300 FT=FT+1:C=FT 

310 H$="LINE"+STRSCCJ+":":T$="" 

320 GOSUB 6000: IF K$=E$ THEN FT=FT-1:G0TO 520 



330 F$(FT)=T$:IF FT<9 THEN 270 

340 GOSUB 3200: GOTO 290 

350 GOSUB 3200: IF FT<1 THEN 420 

360 A$=HID$(STR$(FT),2) 

370 PRINT "WHICH LINE DO YOU WANT TO DELETE? "; 

380 GOSUB 2400: IF KS=E$ THEN 520 

390 C=VALCK$):IF C=FT THEN 410 

400 FOR I=C TO FT-1:F$(I)=F$CI+1):NEXT I 

410 FT=FT-1:IF FT>0 THEN 350 

420 GOSUB 2910:PRINT "NO LINES PRESENT." 

430 GOSUB 2200:GOTO 520 

440 GOSUB 3200 

450 PRINT "CHANGE THE NAME OF WHICH LINE #? "; 

460 GOSUB 2400; IF KS=E$ THEN 220 

470 PRINT K$:C=VAL<K$) 

480 HS="LIN£"+STR$<C)+":":T$=F$CC) 

490 GOSUB 6000: IF KS=E$ THEN 440 

500 F$(C)=T$:GOTO 440 

510 GOSUB 3200:GOTO 220 

520 IF FT>0 THEN HAX=2700\FT ELSE MAX=0 

530 GOTO 220 

540 WS=ES:IF FT>0 THEN 578 

550 GOSUB 300fl:PRINT "YOU MUST ";«SC1);" (OPTION 1" 

560 PRINT "ON MAIN KENU) FIRST. ":GOSUB 2200;GOTO 140 

570 IF RT=MAX THEN GOSUB 3000:6070 620 

580 GOSUB 3100; IF K$=E$ THEN 140 

590 GOSUB 3010;FL=39:IF SE=2 THEN 730 

600 GOSUB 2910:RT=RT+1 

610 IF fiT<HAX+1 THEN 630 ELSE RT=MAX 

620 PRINT DM$(2):G0SUB 220«I:GOTO 140 

650 PRINT TAB(15);"CARD";RT 

640 C=RT;FOR L=1 TO FT:GOSUB 3300 

650 IF KSOES THEN Y$(T) = T$:GOTO 670 

660 L=FT:RT=RT-1 

670 NEXT L:IF KS=E$ THEN 580 

680 PRINT L$:PRINT DM$(0J 

690 LOCATE 21,1:PRINT "CARDS USED:";RT 

700 PRINT "CARDS LEFT:";HAX-RT 

710 GOSUB 2300: IF KS=SP$ THEN 600 ELSE 140 — 



Grolier Electronic Publishing announces 

one of the greatest advances in telecommunications 

since Bell told Watson,"! want you." 



The Information Connection™ is the first access sofovare that takes 
the mystery out of using a modem. 

And, given Hie frustration that modems have caused computer 
users, that is a great advance. 

The Information Connection makes using a modem as easy as 
dialing a telephone. 

it teaches you everything you need to l^now about going online 
— in just minutes — right on the screen , and lets you practice 
without going online. 

Miraculously, its ease of use is matched by its phenomena! power 
Far greater power than you would get from telecommunications 
software costing three or four times as much. 

So you can grow with The Information Connection. But you can 
never outgrow it! For it has more power than even a "power user" 
can use up. 

With The Information Connection, you and your computer are 
connected to online databases, electronic mail services and bul- 
letin boards. To computers down the block and around the world. 
To 300, 1200 or 2400 Baud modems. Instantly. 

You merely have to point to make your computer dial, hang up, 
capture or upload text. A built-in text editor lets you create, edit, 
send and receive standard ASCII fdes - compatible with most 
word processors. 

The informiitim Connectioti is a roistered trademark of (IrolitT Electroftic Pilbti$tiin^. tnc. Appk isa 
re^fjViVt'J irutliniark of Apple Computer, inc ConmttKlore ts a rei.i:iftred trademark ^f Commudf're 
Bu.itneis .\Jartiines_ Inc. ISM ts a rt^nteriti truJcmark nf Inti rnatiaaal HiisiVlf.u Machtnt-'. Irtc 



You can easily access services like CompuServe and The Source 
—automatically— thanks to pre-written "macros" (scripts), 
saving time and money. 

The Information Connection: because you want your first access 
software to be the best you can buy. And the last you'll ever 
need to buy. 

Connect now. At your favorite computer software dealer.* 

THE INFORMATION CONNECTION™ 

It demystifies using a modem. 
And gives you access 
to ttie world. 




$39.95 Commodore 64'* and 128 

$5i7.i75 Apple' II family and 
IBM" PC and compatibles 



"■■^^■"^C 



' IF your dealer doesn't yet have Tlie Information Cnnneclian, order directly 
by calling Jean Cleary loll- free al 1-800-858-8858 exi. 3530. Major 
credit cards honored— and satisfaction guaranteed. Shipping, handling 
and tax additional. CIRCLE READER SERVICE 21 

Grolier Electronic Publishing, Inc. 

SmERMAs tuhNI^kE DANQufiV CONNECTICUT OSfliB • (9001 BM-MM 



PRODUCTIVITY PROGRAM 




720 GOSUB 3010: IF RT=HAX THEN 620 

73(5 H$="INSERT BEFORE WHICH CARD #?":!$="" 

740 FL=35:G0SUB 60M;IF K$=£$ THEN S80 

75(5 GOSUB 3010:C=VAL(T$):IF C>0 AND C<RT+1 THEN 778 

760 PRINT DH$<1):G0SUB 220aiGOTO 573 

770 PRINT TABC13);"NEW :ARD";C 

780 FOR L=1 TO FT: GOSUB 3300 

790 IF KJ=£$ THEN L=FT ELSE Z$<L)=T$ 

800 NEXT L:IF K$=E$ THEN 580 

810 FOR J=RT*FT TO (C-1)*FT+1 STEP -1 

820 Y$CJ+FT)=Y$<J):NEXT a:RT=RT+1 

830 FOR J = 'i TO FT:Y$CCC-1)*FT+J)=ZS(J):NEXT J 

840 GOTO 720 

850 F=-1 

860 GOSUB 3100: IF K$=E$ THEN 140 

870 IF RT>a THEN 890 

680 GOSUB 2910:PRINT DH$(3):G0SUB 2200;GOTO H0 

890 GOSUB 3010: IF SE=2 THEN 980 

900 HS="START WITH WHICH CARD?":T$="":FL=33 

910 GOSUB 6000:IF K$=E$ THEN 860 

920 V=VAL(T$):IF V>0 AND V<RT+1 THEN 940 

930 PRINT L$:PRINT DMSC1):G0SUB 2200:GOTO 860 

940 60SUS 3830: J=V 

950 WS="":60SUB 400®: IF W$=ES THEN 860 

960 J=J+1:IF J<RT+1 THEN 950 

970 GOSUB 3000: PR INT 0HSC2): GOSUB 2200: GOTO 860 

980 GOSUB 5000: GOTO 860 

990 RA$=" (1-"+MID$(STRS(RT),2)+">?" 

1000 FL=7:G0SUB 3100:IF KS=E$ THEN 140 

1010 IF RT>0 THEN 1033 

1020 GOSUB 2910:PRINT DH$<3):G0SUB 2200:GOTO 140 

1030 GOSUB 3010:ON SE GOTO 1040,1070,1120,1130,1140 

1040 PRINT "PRINT WHICH CARD #";RAS 

1050 GOSUB 3700: IF RF THEN 1000 

1060 R1=T:R2=T:G0SUB 3S00:GOTO 990 

1070 PRINT "START WITH WHICH CARD #";RA$ 

1080 GOSUB 3700:R1=T:IF RF THEN 1000 

1090 PRINT "STOP WITH WHICH CARD *?";RAI 

1100 GOSUB 3700:R2=T:IF RF OR R2<R1 THEN 1000 

1110 GOSUB 3800: GOTO 990 

1120 R1=1:R2=RT:G0SUB 3800:GOTO 990 

1130 GOSUB 5000:GOTO 990 

1140 fL=38:HS="LEFT MARGIN (0-40):" 

1150 T$=HID$CSTRSCLMJ,2) 

1160 GOSUB 60«l0:iF <$=E$ THEN 990 

1170 LH=VAL(T$} 

1180 IF LH<0 OR LH>40 THEN LOCATE CSRLIN-1,1 :G0TO 1150 

1190 H$:="BLANK LINES BETWEEN CARDS (0-66):" 

1200 T$=M1D$CSTR$<SP),2) 

1210 GOSUB 6000: IF KS=ES THEN 990 

1220 SP=VAL(T$) 

1230 IF SP<0 OR SP>66 THEN LOCATE CSRLIN-1,1 ;GOTO 1200 

1240 HS="PAUSE AFTER EACH CARD CY/N) :":T$=YN$CPF) 

1250 GOSUB 6000: IF KS=E$ THEN 990 

1260 PF=-(LEFT$(T$,1)="Y") 

1270 HI="PRINT LINE NAMES (Y/N) :":T$=YN$(HF) 

1280 GOSUB 6000: IF K$=E$ THEN 990 

1290 HF=-(LEFT$(T$,1)="Y") 

1300 PRINT L$: GOSUB 2200: GOTO 990 

1310 GOSUB 3100:IF KS=E$ THEN 1380 

1320 CLS:GOSUB 2500;GOSUB 3010 

1330 ON ERROR GOTO 1360 

1340 FILES CHR$(16+ASCCKS))+":*.HIM" 

1350 GOSUB 2600:6OSUB 2200:6OTO 1380 

1360 PRINT "CHECK DISKS AND DRIVE." 

1370 GOSUB 2600:GOSUB 2200:RESUME 1310 

1380 ON ERROR GOTO 0:CLS:GOSUB 2500 

1390 GOSUB 2600:GOTO 140 

1400 FL=31 

1410 GOSUa 3100: IF KS=ES THEN 1380 

1420 GOSUB 3010: IF SE<>2 OR RT<1 THEN 1440 

1430 GOSUB 2700:GOSU6 2910: IF KE=ES THEN 1410 

1440 T$="":IF SE=1 THEN HS="STORE UNDER WHAT NAME?" 

1450 IF SE=2 THEN H$="6ET WHICH FILEBOX?" 

1460 IF S£=3 THEN HS="REMOVE WHICH FILEBOX?" 

,1470 GOSUB 6000: IF TS="" OR K$=ES THEN 1410 



'SORRY, THIS DISK IS FULL. 



HAS OCCURRED. PLEASE C 



1480 TS=TS+".HIM":ON ERROR GOTO 1500 

1490 GOSUB 2910:IF SE=1 THEN 1550 ELSE 1600 

1500 IF ERR=53 AND SE=1 THEN RESUME 1600 

1510 IF ERR=53 THEN PRINT "THAT FILEBOX IS NOT ON THIS 

DISK.":GOTO 1590 
1520 IF ERR=71 THEN PRINT "THE DISK IS NOT READY; CHEC 
K THE DRIVE. ":GOTO 1590 
1530 IF ERR=61 THEN PRINT 
TRY ANOTHER.": GOTO 1590 
1540 PRINT "ERROR";STR$(ERR);' 
HECK YOUR MANUAL. "-GOTO 1590 
1550 OPEN T$ FOR INPUT AS # 2: CLOSE 2 
1560 PRINT "THAT FILEBOX IS ALREADY ON THIS DISK." 
1570 PRINT "PRESS <SPACE BAR> TO REPLACE IT." 
1580 GOSUB 2300: IF K$=SP$ THEN 1600 ELSE 1410 
1590 PRINT L$:GOSUB 2600:GOSU8 2200:RESUME 1410 
1600 CLS:GOSUB 2500:GOSUB 3010 
1610 ON SE GOTO 1620,1700,1820 
1620 OPEN T$ FOR OUTPUT AS # 2 
1630 PRINTS2,TEST$:PRINT#2,FT:PRINT#2,RT 
1640 PfiINT#2,LM;PRINT#2,SP:PRINT#2,PF:PRlNT#2,HF 
1650 FOR J=1 TO FT:PRINT#Z,CHR$C34);FS(J>;CHRSf34) 
1660 NEXT J; IF RT=0 THEN 1690 
1670 FOR J=1 TO RT*FT 

1680 PRINTS2,CHR$(34);YSCJ);CHR$C34):NFXT J 
1690 CLOSE 2: GOSUB 2600: GOTO 1410 
1700 OPEN TI FOR INPUT AS # 2 
1710 INPUT#2,C$:IF C$=TESTS THEN 1740 
1720 CLOSE 2: PRINT "THAT IS NOT A FILEBOX FILE." 
1730 GOTO 1810 

1740 INPUT#2,FT:INPUT#2,RT:INPUT#2,LH 
1750 INPUT#2,SP:INPUT#2,PF:INPUT#2,HF 
1760 FOR J=1 TO FT:INPUT#2,F$CJ):NEXT J 
1770 IF RT=0 THEN 1790 

1780 FOR J=1 TO RT*FT:INPUT#2,YS(J):NEXT J 
1790 CLOSE 2:PRINT "FILEBOX NOW IN MEMORY." 
1800 IF FT>0 THEN MAX=270O\FT ELSE MAX=0 
1810 GOSUB 260O:GOSUB 22O0:GOTO 1410 
1820 KILL T$:GOSUS 2600:GOTO 1410 

1830 GOSUB 31O0:IF SE=1 OR K$=E£ THEN 140 ELSE CLSrENO 
2000 K$=INK£Y$:IF KS="" THEN 2000 ELSE RETURN 
2100 LOCATE ,,1,0,7:GOSUB 20(S0:LOCATE ,,0: RETURN 
2200 GOSUB 2000: IF K$<>E$ THEN 2200 ELSE RETURN 
2300 GOSUB 2000: IF K$<>E$ AND KSOSPS THEN 2300 
2310 RETURN 
2400 GOSUB 2100 

2410 IF KS<>E$ AND (K$<"1" OR K$>A$) THEN 2400 
2420 RETURN 

2500 PRINT L$:PRINT:PRINT L$:RETURN 
2600 LOCATE 23,1:PRINT L$ 

2610 PRINT TA3C11);"PRESS <Esc> TO EXIT."; :RETURN 
2700 PRINT "WARNING! USE OF THIS OPTION WILL ERASE" 
2710 PRINT "CONTENTS OF ALL CARDS FROM MEMORY." 
2720 PRINT:PRIKT DMSCO) :GOSUB 2300:RETURN 
2800 CALL CD{Ayi;,BLX):LOCATE AX,1:RETURN 
2900 A%=4:BLX=19:G0SUB 2800: RETURN 
2910 AX=4:BL%=14: GOSUB 2800:RETURN 
2920 A5;=2:eLS:=1:GOSUB 280(a:fiETURN 
3000 R$=MS<MS):GOTO 3020 
3010 R$=SMS(MI(HS)+SE-1) 
3020 GOSUB 2900: GOSUB 2920 

3030 PRINT SPCa40-LENCfiS))/2);R$:LOCATE 4,1:RETURN 
3100 GOSUB 3000: PRINT: FOR I=HI<MS) TO MICHS+1)-1 
3110 PRINT TAB(6);"<";CHRS(I+49-HI(HS)>;"> ";SM$a) 
3120 PRINT:NEXT I: A$=RIGHTSCSTR$CMI<HS+1)-MI(HS)),1) 
3130 PRINT:PRINT TAB(10);"SELECTION ~>"; 
3140 GOSUB 240O:SE=VAL(t!;$):RETURN 
3200 GOSUB 2900: IF FT<1 THEN RETURN 
3210 FOR 1=1 TO FT 

3220 PRINT "LINE";STR$(I);": ";F$<I):NEXT i 
3230 PRINT L$;IF MS=3 OR MS=4 THEN RETURN 
3240 IF SE=4 THEN GOSUB 2200: RETURN ELSE RETURN 
3300 T=(C-1)*FT+L:H$=F$(L)+":":T$="" 
3310 IF W$="C" THEN TS=:Y$(T) 
3320 GOSUB 6000: RETURN 
3400 W5="":LPRINT TABCLH+15);"CARD"; J > 



^ 



74 FAMILY COMPUTING 



3410 FOR 1=1 TO fT:TS="":IF HF THEN TS=F$(Z)+": " 

3420 LPRINT TABCLH);T$;YS(CJ-1)*FT+Z> 

3430 W$=INKEy$:IF WS=£$ THEN Z=FT:J=R? 

3440 NEXT Z:IF WS=£$ THEN RETURN 

3A50 IF SP=0 THEN 3470 

3460 FOR Z=1 TO SP:LPRINT:NEXT Z 

3470 GOSUB 2910: IF PF=a THEN RETURN 

3480 PRINT OH$(0):GOSUB 2300: IF K$=SP$ THEN RETURN 

3490 J=R2: RETURN 

3500 PRINT TABC15);"CAR0";J:PRINT L$ 

3510 FOR Z=1 TO FT:PRINT FS(Z);": "; Y$< Cj-1 )*f T+Z) 

3520 NEXT ZrPRINT LS:R£TURN 

3600 PRINT "PRESS <SPACE BAR> WHEN PRINTER IS READY." 

3610 GOSUB 2300:RETURN 

3700 RF=-1:H$="?":TS="":G0SUa 6000:PRINT L$ 

3710 IF K$=E$ OR T$="" THEN RETURN 

3720 T=VALCT$):IF T>0 AND T<=RT THEN RF=0:ReTURN 

3730 PRINT DM$(15:G0SUB 2200:RETURN 

3800 GOSUB 3600: IF KS=E$ THEN RETURN 

3810 FOR J=R1 TO R2:G0SUB 3400 

3820 NEXT J:LPRINT:RETURN 

3830 LOCATE 19,1 

3840 PRINT "PRESS <C> TO CHANGE THIS CARD," 

3850 PRINT "PRESS <P> TO PRINT IT," 

3860 PRINT "PRESS <R> TO REMOVE IT, OR" 

3870 PRINT "PRESS <SPACE BAR> TO HOVE TO NEXT CARD.":R 

ETURN 

4000 GOSUB 2910: GOSUB 3500 

4010 GOSUB 2000:IF KS=E$ THEN W$=E$:J=RT: RETURN 

4020 IF K$=SP$ THEN RETURN 

4030 IF K$="C" THEN 4090 ELSE IF KS="R" THEN 4140 

4040 IF K$<>"P" THEN 4010 ELSE GOSUB 2900 

4050 IF F THEN GOSUB 3600: IF K$=E$ THEN 4080 

4060 F=0:PRINT "NOW PRINTING CARD";J 

4070 GOSUB 3400: LPRINT 

4080 J=J-1:G0SUB 3830: RETURN 

4090 GOSUB 2900 

4100 GOSUB 3010:FL=40:PRINT TAB(15); "CARD"; J 

4110 C=J:W$="C":FOR L=1 TO FT:GOSUB 3300 

4120 IF KS=E$ THEN L=FT ELSE r$(T)=T$ 

4130 NEXT L:J=J-1:G0SUB 3830:RETURN 

4140 GOSUB 2900:GOSUB 3500 

4150 PRINT "PRESS <SPACE 8AR> TO REMOVE THIS CARD." 

4160 GOSUB 2300:GOSUB 3S30:IF K$=E$ THEN J=J-1:RETURN 

4170 IF J=RT THEN 4190 

4180 FOR Z=<J-1)*FT+1 TO CRT-1 )*FT:Y$tZ)=YSCZ+FT) :N£XT 

I 
4190 RT=RT-1:J=J-1:RETURN 

4200 PRINT "<SPACE BAR> TO HOVE TO NEXT CARD,":RETURN 
5000 G0SU8 3210:A$=RIGHT$CSTR$(FT),1) 
5010 W$="":PRINT "SELECT CARDS BY WHICH LINE #?"; 
5020 GOSUB 2400: IF KS=E$ THEN RETURN 
5030 V=VAL(K$>: GOSUB 2910 

5040 PRINT "WHAT TEXT ARE YOU SEARCHING FOR?" 
5050 FL=40:H$="?":TS=""; GOSUB 6000 
5060 IF K$=E$ OR T$="" THEN RETURN 
5070 GOSUB 2900:LOCATE 5,5 

5080 PRINT "<t> MATCH FROM BEGINNING OF LINE" 
5090 PRINT RES;TAB(5);"<2> SEARCH WHOLE LINE":PRINT 
5100 A$="2":PRINT TABC8);"SELECTI0N — >"; 
5110 GOSUB 2400: IF K$=E$ THEN RETURN 
5120 GOSUB 2900:SF=0:SRS=T$:LS=LEN(SRS> 
5130 J=1:IF K$="2" THEN 5190 
5140 LOCATE 4,10:PRINT "CHECKING CARO";J 
5150 IF SR$<>LeFT$(T$(<J-1>*FT+V),LS) THEN 5170 
5160 SF=1;WS="": GOSUB 3830:GOSUB 4000:GOSUB 2900 
5170 X$=INKEY$:1F W$=E$ OR X$=ES THEN RETURN 
5180 J=J+1:IF J<=RT THEN 5140 ELSE 5290 
5190 Z$(0)=Y${(J-1)*FT+V):LZ=LEN(Z$(0)) 
5200 LOCATE 4,10:PRINT "CHECKING CARD";J 
5210 IF Z$(0)="" OR LZ<LS THEN 5280 
5220 FOR W=l TO LZ-LS+1 
5230 IF SR$<>HID$(ZS<0),W,LS) THEN 5250 
5240 W=256:SF=1:W$="":G0SUB 3830:GOSUB 4000:GOSU8 2900 

5250 XS=INKEY$:IF W$=E$ OR X$=E$ THEN W=300 



-^ 



5260 NEXT W:IF W=300 THEN RETURN 

5270 IF W$=E$ OR X$=E$ THEN RETURN 

5280 J=J+1:IF J<RT+1 THEN 5190 

5290 GOSUB 2900: IF SF<1 THEN 5310 

5300 PRINT "NO MORE CARDS MATCH !": GOSUB 2200:R£TURN 

5310 PRINT "NO CARDS MATCH! ":GOSUB 2200:RETURN 

6000 PRINT H$;:XL=POSC0) :YL=CSRLIN:PC=2:T$=SPS+T$ 

6010 LOCATE YL,XL; PRINT T$;ES;SPS 

6020 LOCATE YL,XL+PC-1 

6030 GOSUB 2100:IF K$=RES OR KS=ES THEN 6130 

6040 IF LENCK$)=1 THEN 6090 

6050 K=ASCCMID$(KS,2)):CU=CK=75)-CK=77) 

6060 IF K=83 THEN 6080 ELSE IF CU=0 THEN 6030 

6070 PC=PC+CU:PC=PC-CPC<2)+(PC>LEN(TS)+1);G0T0 6020 

6080 TS=LEFT$CT$,PC-1)+MID$(TS,PC+1,LEN(T$)):G0T0 6010 

6090 IF K$<SPS THEN 6030 

6100 IF LEN(T$)>FL-XL-1 THEN 6030 

6110 TS=LEFTS(T$,PC-?)+K$+«ID$(T$,PC,LENCT$5) 

6120 PC=PC+1:G0T0 6010 

6130 T$=HID$(T$,2,FL):L0CATE Yl,XL+1 :PRINT TS; SP$ 

6140 LOCATE YL+1,1:RETURN 

7000 DATA DESIGN CARD FORMAT, ADD CAHD(S) 

7010 DATA DISPLAY/CHANGE/REMOVE CARDCS), PRINT CARDCS) 

7020 DATA LIST ALL FILES ON DISK 

7030 DATA GET NEW/STORE/REMOVE FILEBOX,QUIT 

7040 DATA 4, ADD NEW LINES,OELETE LINES 

7050 DATA CHANGE NAMES OF LINES, DISPLAY CARD FORMAT 

7060 DATA 2, ADD AT END, INSERT BEFORE END 

7070 DATA 2, LOOK AT CARDS CONSECUTIVELY 

7080 DATA WORK WITH SELECTED CARD(S) 

7090 DATA 5, PRINT ONE CARD, PRINT A RANGE OF CARDS 

7100 DATA PRINT ALL CARDS, PRINT SELECTED CARDCS) 

7110 DATA CHANGE PRINTER OPTIONS, 2, "DISK A:", "DISK B:" 

7120 DATA 3, STORE THIS FILEBOX ON DISK 

7130 DATA GET A FILEBOX FROM DISK 

7140 DATA REMOVE A FILEBOX FROM DISK 

7150 DATA 2, RETURN TO MAIN HENU,QUIT 

8000 DATA "PRESS <SPACE BAR> TO CONTINUE." 

8010 DATA NO SUCH CARD], NO MORE CARDS! 

8020 DATA NO CARDS PRESENT. 

9000 DATA SH55,SH06,SH8B,SHEC,SHB4,aH0F,SHCD,SH10,8H8A 

9010 DATA aHDC,£H80,8HF8,SH07,SH75,£H08,&HB8,SH00,&HB0 

9020 DATA &H8E,8HC0,£HF9,£H72,SH05,6HB8,SH00,SHB8,8H8E 

9030 DATA SHC0,6H8B,SHB6,SH0A,aH00,£H8B,8H84,gH00,8H00 

9040 DATA SHFE,&HC3,SHF6,SHE3,8HD1,£HE0,£H8B,SHF8,8H8B 

9050 DATA SHB6,£H08,aH00,SH8B,SH8C,£H00,£H00,aHB4,8H07 

9060 DATA £HB0,8H20,SHB7,SH00,8H51,8H8B,SHCB,8HFC,SHF3 

9070 DATA £HAB,£H59,8HE2,SHF7,&H07,£H5D,&HCA,aH04,8H00 



COMPUTERS WE COVER 

We regularly present two or more programs in each issue for the 
Apple II series; Atari 400/800. 600/800XL, and 130XE; Commo- 
dore 64 and 128 (In C 64 mode): IBM PC and compatibles: Mac- 
intosh; and Tandy Models 111/4 and Color Computer. However, 
occasionally we have to omit versions when a program requires 
capabilities that some of these computers lack. For example, we 
usually won't run a Tandy Model HI or 4 version of a program 
featuring sound and/or color graphics. And many Microtones 
programs can only run on computers thai have three voices, 
which eiiminates the Apple 1! series; IBM PC and compatibles 
(except the PCjr with Cartridge BASIC): and the Tandys. 

In addition, we publish at least one program each issue for 
the Adam, T1-99/4A. and VIC-20. In the future, we also hope to 
cover the Atari 520ST and the Amiga. 

This month, these programs can be found here in The Pro- 
grammer and in Microtones (in the k-poweb section of family com- 
ptrriNG). 



JANUARY 1986 75 




Hard-to-find software 
made easy to order: 



WwGmb 

C6n9P 



i'livitwii' 



«WWilFT».» 



^ARNlKit 



""Eljf 



2010 






MOUU TKAP 



Just dial 800-842-1225 



i 



Now, you can order all 
this exciting ColecoVision- 
and Adam™ software direct 
from Coleco. 

Just call us toll free and 
well send you a brochure. 

Then select the game 
cartridges, peripherals or 
software programs that 
you've been looking for* 

So call today Our lines 
are open from 8:30AM to 
5:00 PM EST And to save time 
order by phone. 

ADAM" 

COLECO Vision 



Jaf^'fe CAtl^iPGt K» UH WITH 

_SCK™ CoLs3aV*5«3rr4 ADAIVI 




U) 



LOGO 




iJMi^m 



nJtSH FACTS 



tyofsomesoft 



HunwrtrtjtH-senes 



ubjecttpi 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 9 






FOR THE COMPUTER GEN 




Edited by Anne Kmeger 



Makins It Bis as a 
Computer Consultant 



^^\ 



T I O N 



't:- 



Have you ever looked at someone 
less computer-projxcient than your- 
self and thought. "Yikes. What a 
dummy." Josh Ruxin, 15. of Ridge- 
Jield. Connecticut, had those 
thoughts, too. But instead oj mock- 
ing the novice scratching his head 
in the computer store. Josh turned 
it to his advantage — he started his 
own consulting business. You 
could, tool 

Know nothing about computing? 
Call Josh Ruxin. Can't figure out 
what computer system would be best 
for your family? Call Josh Ruxin. 
Pulling out your hair over computer 
salespeople who're less than helpful? 
Call — you guessed it — Josh Rixxin! 

Josh is a computer fanatic, a for- 
mer sysop of a 24-hour bulletin 
board, and a prospering computer 
consultant. He's developed a thriving 
business helping computer novices 
find a system that fits their needs. 
He shows the individual or family 
how to use a computer, from hooking 
it up and running programs to trou- 
bleshooting system problems. Josh 
started his business, which he calls 



Computer Catch, two years ago. 

It all began when "people who real- 
ly wanted to buy computers but were 
scared off by the complexity began 
asking me for help," Josh says. Be- 
fore he knew it, he was traveling to 
clients' homes and interviewing fam- 
ily members who planned to use the 
computer. He helps them determine 
what they want the system to do and 
how much they want to spend. 

But it doesn't stop there. Josh 
shops around and puts together a 
complete system for his clients, in- 
cluding basic hardware, peripherals, 
and software. He also delivers the 
system and hooks it up, "This elimi- 
nates the sinking feeling many peo- 
ple get when they're faced with a 
mountain of boxes, a tangle of ca- 
bles, and a manual that seems to be 
written in a foreign language!" Josh 
explains. 

Josh makes sure his clients un- 
derstand the ins and outs of the sys- 
tem, typically saving novices from 
five to 15 hours of frustrating time 
they'd spend glued to the monitor 
and manual. In case one of the new 




components fails the first time, Josh 
even carries a spare computer sys- 
tem with him to substitute for the 
defective equipment while he ex- 
changes It, Although Josh favors 
Commodore equipment, he has 
worked with other manufacturers. 
His fee: "I charge a percentage of 
the cost of the equipment, since the 
more they buy, the more help they 
need," Josh says. Computer Catch 
earned about 82,000 in 1984 and 
even more in 1985. Josh's future 
plans include investing in Commo- 
dore stock and purchasing the Com- 
modore Amiga. And next year? Well. 
Josh will be 16 and, he says, "My 
business will be a iot bigger because 
I'll be able to driuel" 

— GEORGENE MULLER 



Software Scoop! 

Can you name the sequal to Zork? If 
so, you could be one of 20 adventur- 
ers who'll win an Itifocem game of 
their choice. How, you're asking? 
Well, QuestBustcrs — the monthly 
newsletter for adventure-game lov- 
ers — is sponsoring a contest. To 
qualify, send in the name of the se- 
quel to Zorfc, along with a self-ad- 
dressed, business-size stamped en- 
velope to: QuestBusters. 202 Elgin 



Court, Wayne, PA 19087. The con- 
test deadline is Feb. 1, so whaddya 
waiting for? .... Ready to play 
hardball, tough guys and dolls? 
Then try Hartlball from those clever 
ex- Actlvision people at Accolade. The 
action's all yours for Commodore 64 
or 128 IS29.95), or Apple computers 
(S34.95) .... Say, have you heard 
about the submarine simulation 
called Silent Stnriee? It's a super 
software game with five stunning 
battle screens, six skill levels, and 
stimulating sub strategies in the 



South Pacific. From Microprosc for 
your Commodore, Apple, IBM. and 

Atari computers (S34.95) The 

"ultimate modern-day computer 
mystery" is what Actlvision is calling 
its game H»dfgr. There's a 
mystery, there are different solu- 
tions, there's a secret, there are no 
clues, no instructions, and no rules 
and that's all we'll say. Except 
that it's for Atari and Commodore 
64 and is planned for Apple. It costs 
between S25 and S35. S'all for 
now. . . . 



JANUARY 1986 77 



Get the OKIDATA 120 
at these fine stores: 

Advantage Computer 

Accessories (Ouiada) 
Childworid/Children's PaJact- 
Consumers DLstributing 
David Weis 
Electronics Boutique/ 

Games & Gadgets 
Federated 
Fred Meyer 
Cemco 
LioneJ/Kiiklie City/ 

Lionel Plaworid 
Montgomery Ward 

(at participating stores) 
S. E. Nichols 
SeA'ice Merchiuidise 
Toys 'R Us 

MS-8348 



Left Brain. 



Thi«» ClKir 




Rational. Functiona]. F*recise. 

Introducing the OKIDATA 120, the loj^cal printer for your 

Commodore' computer. 

Get results fast. With a utility* mode that zips through letters 
and reports at twice the speed of any Commodore printer. 

Switch to the enhanced mode. And print your most important 
ideas with typevmter c!arit>'. Or illustrate your rationaie vrith the 
120's bit image graphics for high resolution charts, graphs and 
drawings. 

Stay on target With a self-inking "Clean Hands" ribbon 
cartridge. And Okidata's famous fijll year warranty on parts, 
labor and printhead. 

The OKIDATA 120. At S269*. it's the only Commodore- 
compatible printer that makes sense. 

For more information, call 1-800-OKIDATA (in New Jersey 
609-235-2600). Mt. Laurel, NJ 08054. 



OKIDATA 

m. an OKI AMERICA company 

We put business on paper. 



Commodon' is a regisk'rcii Inuk'mark <if dimmixffia' Hu.sint'.'is MacliitiL-s. Inc. 
OKIPAT.A b a rvfiisttred IraJcniiirk of Oki .America. Inc. 
()l\[l)AT.-\-. Marque dcpiisc.< lic Oki Amcrii;;!. Inc. 
■Miimifacturcr'.s sufficstcd retail price. 



Right Brain 




Effervescent. Colorful. Outrageous. 

Meet the OKIMATE 10, the $208* color printer that takes 

your Atari" or Commodore' computer over the rainbow! 

Dazzle 'em, With brilliant printing in over 36 eye-tickling 
colors. Reds, greens, golds and blues that breathe life into 
everything: from charts and graphs to original drawings and 
overhead transparencies. 

And when you're forced to work in black and white, the 
OKLVIATE 10 prints crisp, clean reports and papers— at 240 
words per minute. You can even add spice with wide, bold and 
fine print. 

Everything you need for color printing comes with the 
OKIMATE 10 and its Plug 'n Print package. Including a data 
cable. Learn to Print and Color Screen Print software diskettes, 
a color ribbon cartridge, a black ribbon cartridge and paper. 

So c'mon, print on the wild side. With the OKIMATE 10 
Personal Color Printer from Okidata. 

For more information, call 1-800-OKIDATA (in New Jersey 
609-235-2600). Mt. Laurel, NJ 08054. 




an OKI AMERICA company 

We put business on paper. 



".Manufacturers suffieslfd retail price- Atari is a rc^stured trademark of .\tari. Inc. 

Coraniidiire is a refiislcmi trademark of CiimmiKiore Business .Machines, inc. 

OKIi>AT,-\ is a refii.stcrtd trademark of Oki America. Inc. 

OKI! ) ATA ■ Marque dtpo.^es de Oki America, Inc. 

OKlMATi; ;uid l'li« 'n I'rint are trademarks of Oki America. Inc. 

To run E'kig 'n I'rint softw.ire, the Commodore M. ]2H and I'l.US 4 require disk drive. 

Atari requires disk drive and a 4HK mernctr>'. 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 33 



Buy Now! 

S15 .^lanufacturer's 

rebate on OKL^IATE 10. 

Offer gfxxl from October 1, 
1985 through January' 31, 
1986. See the followng par- 
ticipating stores for details. 

Advantage Computer 

Acce.s.sories (Canada) 
Arthur's Jewelers 
Best Catalog Sliowooms 
Brendle's 
Caldor 

Childworid/Children's Palace 
Consumers DLstributing 
Crazy liddie 
David VVeis 

Dol^ns Catalog Showrooms 
Electronic Boutique/ 

Games & Gadgets 
Ellman's 
Evans 
Federated 
Fred Me\'er 
Fred P. Gattas 
G.C. Murphy/Murphy Mart 
G.I. Joe 
Gtieat Westem 

Catalog Showooms 
J. Triesman 

Jafco Catalog ShouTOoms 
IvaBelles Catalog Showrooms 
Lionel/Kiddie Cit)7 

Lionel Pla>'worid 
iMcDade 

Meijers (Niichigan only) 
iMontgomeo' Ward 

(at participating stores) 
Prange 
S.E. Nichols 
Save-Rite 
Sears, Roebuck & Co. 

(at participating stores) 
Sen'Ice Merchandise 
Stereo Village 
Stokes 
Toys 'R Us 
Videoiand 
VVitmark 

Wizards Electronics 
Za\TC 



Girls Just Wanna 
Compute! 

Thejollowing is an opinion arti- 
cle by Rachel Parry, a i 5-year-old 
computer enthusiast Jrom Mans- 
field. Ohio, where she attends Mad- 
ison High School If you'd like to air 
your opinions on "computer libera- 
tion." please address your reply to: 
K-POWER. 730 Broadtvay, New York, 
NY 10003. 

Computers are supposed to bridge 
the generation gap, right? How 
many of you have helped your par- 
ents, teachiers, or other adults with 
a computer-related problem? There 
seems to be equal opportunity' in 
that respect most of the time, but 
what about the boy-gir! gap? 

There are certain things that al- 
most always fall Into the category of 
boys vs. girls. Some of them have 
changed with the times. Girls are no 
longer looked down on if they don't 
wear lacy dresses all of the time. Lit- 
tle boys can play with dolls (but 
they're called "action figures" when a 
boy plays with Ihem). 

But boys still are expected to be 
"brains " in math and science. And it 
seems that many people associate 
computers with math and science. 
Can only boys be computer genius- 
es? Of course not. But sometimes it 
looks that way. 

Take my school, for example. 



There is a group of very Intelligent 
kids who'rc literally years ahead of 
the average math student and do 
very well in ad\'anced science classes. 
Most of them are "computer whizzes," 

By hearing that description, you'd 
think they fit snugly into the stereo- 
type that all intelligent life on the ju- 
venile level is short, wears Coke-bot- 
tle glasses, carries a calculator, 
wears shirts buttoned up to the 
point of strangulation, knows an ex- 
ceptional amount about computers, 
and is male. This group isn't — ex- 
cept for the last two, which are the 
points I'd like to write about. 

These boys are smart, but they're 
not the only ones who know a bit 
from a byte. Girls are right up there 
with them. Sometimes people don't 
realize this. 

For example, in the popular movie 
WarGames from a few years back, 
where did Ihegirl stand in terms of 
computer knowledge? I'll tell you 
where she stood: right behind the 
computer genius, a boy. She stood 
over his shoulder and was mesmer- 
ized by his talent. Would the effect 
have been the same if the roles were 
reversed? In the media, boys are un- 
mistakably the computer experts. 

I don't know why this is. but I do 
know it's not right. There have been 
women in space, women In high po- 
sitions in our judicial system, and a 
woman vice-presidential candidate. 
And still, many people feel uncom- 




Rachttl Panys request: Sh« wants female 
cempuler users lo be given the same 
chance as males to team and jfow. 

fortable with females in positions 
typically held by males. Why? And, 
more importantly, what can be done 
to change this view? 

I don't know why women have al- 
ways been a few steps beliind men. 
But I do know how it can begin to 
change. Girls, get out there and 
show the world that we, too, can be 
computer, math, and science ge- 
niuses. Don't be discouraged if 
things are rough — they will improve. 
Guys, encourage your female coun- 
terparts in their quest for computer 
greatness. Maybe there is a girl out 
there who knows a programming 
trick that could really help you. 
Don't feel like your territory' is being 
invaded. It's not. Everyone wants to 
know about computers. 

A computer is a useful, education- 
al, and recreational tool. Its benefits 
should be enjoyed by everyone. Com- 
puter liberation is on its way! 



Hackers Can Be Poets 

Can hackers be poets? Can hi-tech 
mix with art? Please help usjind 
out. by doing your part. . . . 

Since we made that poetic request 
in the June k-powbb. weVe been talk- 
ing about rhyme, meters, and 
rhythm around here almost more 
than we talk about programming! 
Here are the top two poetic (and en- 
tertaining) entries. Their authors re- 




Hacker paet Alex Oliphant 



ceived software prizes. Jeff Dague. 
14. from Clinton, Iowa received an 
honorable mention. 

B.C. — Before Computers 

— SAMANIHA POZNEK, 14 

Albany, New York 

In the days of the cavemen. 
No computers had they. 
They had a hard life, 
Writing in clay. 

The ancient Greek myths 
Would have had more success. 
If they hadn't been told. 
But instead, word processed. 

The Dark Ages, you see. 
Would not have had to occur. 
If people had learned 
By the light of a cursor. 

Back in 1775. 

Wlien Paul Revere rode, 

A trip could have been saved. 

If the message had gone 

By computer code. 



Now in almost every home. 
A computer is found. 
But God only knows, 
For what ne.xt we are bound! 



More K Power 

— ALEX OLIPHAAT, 13 

Concord. Massachusetts 

I bought a computer 
To save me some time. 
Maybe help on my homework 
Or help solve a crime. 
But since it's been home 
(You'll know what I mean). 
All I do is sit and punch buttons 
And stare at the screen. 

My room is a shambles. 

My chores are undone. 

My parents now urge me 

To get out in the sun . . . 

I tell them "Yah-yah." 

Just give me one hour . . . 

I could solve the world's problems 

With Just a little more K power! 



80 FAMILY COMPUTING 



Give your child the educational 
advantages of a lifetime 
with Scholastic Skill Builders. 



introducing 
Schoiastic Sklii Builders 

Now, Scholastic offers a brand new soft- 
ware series for the home that will help 
your child shine in school. 

Never before has software so exciting 
been so educational. Each easy-to-use 
program brings to life the same subjects 
being covered in class. Each is designed to 
provoke curiosity, tap creativity and build 
academic skills at every level of ability. And 
together, they can take your child to the 
very limits of his or her potential. 

Tky one free for 10 days 

To introduce you to this revolutionary series, 
we invite you to try — based on your child's 
grade level — either of the following tv;o 
programs without charge orobligation. 

Choose Tales of Mystery {grades 3 to 5) 
and watch your child weave spine-tingling 
detective stories while improving reading 
comprehension and critical thinking. 

Choose Agent USA (grades 6 to 8) and 
a thrilling spy caper becomes a fascinating 
learning experience in geography, math, 
logic and problem solving. 

And , if you order before March 31. 1986 . 
you'll receive an ear ly bird bonus g ift: 



1MM£{ 





"Computer Thinking," a fun-filled illus- 
trated workbook about computers and 
programming. 

And tiiat's |ust 
tiie lieginning 

If you're as happy with the first selection 
as we expect you'll be, we'll send you an 
exciting new program every other month, 
specially geared to your child's grade level. 

There's Secret Filer, to keep track of 
facts and figures — from phone numbers 
to football stats — while teaching your 
child about databases. There's Turtle 
Tracl<s, in which students create designs 
and compose music while learning to 
program computers with Scholastic's easy- 
to-learn logo language. There's 



Bannercatch, which helps kids work as a 
team to challenge Max, Guardian of the 
Galactic Tollway, as they master problem 
solving and binary math skills. 

Skill Builders is an incomparable on- 
going software series offering countless 
learning opportunities your child can profit 
from for years! 

It's not oniy fun, 
it's ScKolastic 

The new Scholastic Skill Builders series is 
the product of 60 years experience in 
making learning fun. It features software 
programs currently being used by millions 
of kids in schools across America. And it's 
been endorsed and acclaimed by teachers 
everywhere. 

For details on receiving your trial soft- 
ware program and bonus gift, see the at- 
tached brochure. Or, if it's been removed, 
use the coupon below. 

Order today, and prepare your child for 
the challenges of tomorrow. 



^^Scholastic Software 

The most trusted name in learning 



Order Form: ^^^^^ 

Mail to: Skill Builders from Scholastic Software 
RO, Box 947, Hicksvilte. New York 11802 

□ YES. I would like to examine free for 10 days the exciting new Skill Builders 
software program selected fjelow. And, if I order before K/larch 31, 1986, I'll also 
receive a bonus gift book, "Computer Thinking." At the same time, enroll my cinild 
in the Scholastic Skill Builders software series. 

If I decide to keep the first program I will pay only S9 95 (plus shipping and handling). 
The book, "Computer Thinking," will be mine to keep at no extra charge My child wi 
then receive a new Skill Builders software prog ram every other month Each program 
IS $29 95 for Apple or IBM or S22.95 for Commodore (plus shipping and handling), 
and comes with a free 10-day trial. There is no minimum number of programs that 
I must buy, and I maycancelatany time simply by notifying you. 

Program SelfKted (Check one bOK}: 

Grades3-5 Tales of M/stery GradesS-S. AgentUSA 

□ Apple 61218 p Apple 61226 
M Commodore-M 51234 M Commodore-64 612'12 
U IBM PCS IBM PCjr 61259 Q IBM PC & IBM PC|i 61267 



Name . 



Address 
City 



Child's Name _ 



-State 
-Age 



D Payment encbsed D Bill me 

Credit Ciid # 

gnalure 



Charge my: D Visa D lulasterCaid 

Exp Datf>. 



Sign 

If you charge to yojr credit card, we will automatically bill yau for each still Builders Pribram shipped 




TIPS, 



TRICKS, 



COLONIAL 
CONQUEST 



SSI. Strategy/simulation. (See re- 
view in the December 1985 family 
COMPUTING.) Your mission: As one of 
the six major powers (England. Ger- 
many, France, United States, Japan, 
and Russia) in the Age of imperial- 
ism, you must tn' to gain power by 
colonizing neutral countries. Sub- 
verting other countries, fortifying 
your own. and waging war against 
one or more of the major nations are 
some of the options available. (Hints 
and game for Atari, C 64). 

<^B* If a foreign power starts to 
move into an area that you want (es- 
pecially a heavily populated one), let 
it take over what it wants. Then in- 
vade the land that was taken over, 
preferably before it's fortified. If 
you're playing against the computer 
at a high skill level, you might be 
better off finding a new region or 
taking over what you can. and then 
getting out of the war with economic 
aid. 

^*"» Never invade a country in a 
different region by sea unless you're 
sure of victory. If you have a colony 
tn the area, send your men there 
and stage the attack by land. If you 
don't have holdings in the region, 
completely subvert one countrj' and 
send your men there. 




^ki» Don't invade a country from 
two or more places unless you are 
short on time or if it's a certain vic- 
tory. Each time you enter a country 
it's considered a separate attack, so 
it's better to invade in one major of- 
fensive than with many smaller 
ones. You'll save men and points by 
grouping in one area and attacking 
from there. 

^^ When playing against com- 
puter opponents at skill levels of sev- 
en to nine, it's imperative that you 
don't get into a war with them until 
you've played long enough to amass 
a large army (more than two to three 
million). 

^^» Russia: Initially, concentrate 
on building up your army, ignoring 
your navy. Pick off one or two coun- 
tries at a time and keep large re- 
serves of men in them. You'll be best 



PHANTASIE 



SSI. Role-playing adventure. In this 
swords-and-sorcery game, you must 
choose a band of six adventurers 
from a huge variety of races and 
classes, and then seek out and de- 
stroy the Dark Lord. Along the way 
you'll come across a plethora of mon- 
sters, tricks, traps, treasures, towns, 
and, of course, dungeons. (Hints 
and game for Apple), 

Aha» Before you can take the water 
rune, you need to visit three magic 
pools scattered around the land- 
scape. 

c^Hi* Although Random Creatures 
are difficult to train at first, they 
usually make better fighters or 
thieves than the standard races. 
You II have more gold than you know 
what to do with later on. 



^tmm In the beginning, you should 
allocate most of the shares to your 
weaker characters. This will Increase 
their experience levels and conse- 
quently their hit points, enabling 
them to survive longer. 

*P^» Although your thieves might 
not like it, make sure you destroy 
everything in the Dark Lord's dun- 
geon [with the sole exception of his 




off keeping to regions six, seven, 
and the eastern part of three. 

<^^ When your budget tops 1 
million dollars, start building mil- 
lion-man armies each year and 
march them to the fronts. With 
these waves of men you should be 
able to overrun France and even Ger- 
many (only on lower skill levels). Fi- 
nally, when your position is secure, 
start building a navy and sending 
men overseas (make sure you have 
utilized the subversion hint). 

"^^ United States: Try to gain 
control of region one first, starting 
with Quebec and Alaska in the north 
and Mexico in the south. Once you 
hold Mexico, send a large number of 
troops down through Central Ameri- 
ca into South America. Build your 
forces on the west coast, since you 
will have access to both Canada and 
Central America. — specwl Ks 



wand). Also, make sure you bring as 
many magic potions as j'ou can car- 
ry. To get them, go through all the 
towns and buy out the stores. 

^^» Whenever anyone tells you 
anything or you read something on 
a wall, make sure you copy it down 
word for word. This is especially im- 
portant in the dungeon with the 
Bleebs. 

^^» (Apple only.) When you're fair- 
ly powerful (ninth or 10th level), go 
into the dungeon of Woodville, Once 
there, deface the top statue in the 
temple. A minor deity will attack 
you, but it isn't too hard to defeat it. 
You will receive a lot of experience as 
well as gold. Make sure when you 
leave the dungeon that you don't 
save its status. That way you'll be 
able to repeat the process as much 
as you like. — special Ks 



82 FAMILY COMPUTING 



VOODOO CA57I£ 

Adventure International. Text adven- 
ture. Your mission; Amid the cham- 
bers and dungeons of Voodoo Castle, 
you must find a way to remove a 
curse from Count Cristo. (Hints and 
game for all computers.) 

^^» The closed stone door can be 
opened with the wave of a ring. 



^^^ Drink the mixed chemicals 
for a small surprise. 

^^ A cleaning a day keeps the 
idol OK. 

*^^ The animal heads in plain 
view are into safe hiding. 

•^^ Many ex-cons tell of things 
they saw in prison. 



^h* When you see a plaque, wave 
the sack, then enter the crack. 

*^*"» I'll tell you but once 

Say "ZAP" to the ju-ju man 
1 hope you listened. 

— MIKE HUEBSHMAN. 15. ThoToJare. 
New Jersey; MICHAEL harrfson. 16. 
Hattiesburg, Mississippi; michael 
BRUNSON, 14, Forth Worth, Texas 



H 



I 



N 



H 



N 



REALM OF IMPOSSIBILITY, Eiec 

tronic Arts (Atari). Arcade/strategy. 
Your mission: By exploring different 
planes of existence and avoiding the 
monsters there, you must try to re- 
cover nine crowns. 

^^^ As soon as you enter a room, 
hold down the OPTION key. This will 
cause the monsters to ignore you. 
When you reach an exit, press your- 
self against it and release the but- 
ton. You will move to the next room, 
where you can repeat the process. 
— GEORGE SCOTT. 14. Sail Lake City, 
Utah 

GYRUSS. Parker Brothers (Atari, 
C 64). Arcade/skill. Your mission: to 
battle your way through hordes of 
aliens and reach Earth. 

•P^* When you get to the chance 
screens for each planet, position 
your ship as follows. Neptune: T, B, 
B. E Uranus: R, R. B, L. Saturn: Bot- 
tom left, B. R. T. Jupiter; B. B, T, T. 
Mars: R, B. L, T. Earth; T, L, B. R. 
T-Top. B-Bottom. R-Right, L-Left. 
The first tetter refers to the position 
your ship should be in to shoot the 
first wave of aliens, etc. — hyuon KIM, 
14. Tacoma. Washington 

BEACH HEAD II. Access (C 64). 
Arcade/skill. Your mission: As the Al- 
lied forces leader, you must free your 
comrades from the prison of the ma- 
niacal Dictator. As the Dictator, 
don't let the Allied forces escape 
alive. 

^xi^ In the "escape" sequence, stay 
low and to the side of the road. 
When you're coming within sight of 
a wall, move as high as you can and 
then tap the joystick forward twice. 




Slay on Idt side «f the vertical p«SM3«. 



You'll be at the correct altitude to de- 
stroy the tank on the wall. — Chris- 
topher burke, 13. Elm Grove. Wis- 
consin 

H.E,R,0,, Activision (Atari, C 64), 
Arcade/skill. Your mission: Wearing 
a helicopter backpack, and armed 
with a laser and several sticks of dy- 
namite, you must plummet Into the 
Van Ryzin mine to rescue trapped 
miners from an earthquake. 

•^•^ Using the laser to blast 
through walls is much safer than 
using dynamite in areas where re- 
treating could be deadly. 

•^•■^ Unless you've memorized the 
layout of the mine, slow down before 
descending and keep to the left of 
wide, downward passages to avoid 
breaking lights, —special k.s 

M,U.L,E.. Electronic Arts (Atari, 
C 64). Strategy/simulation. Your 
mission: to establish the most prof- 
itable colony on a distant planet. 

«^hii» During Auctions, the count- 
down passes more quickly when no 
players are moving between the Buy 
and Sell lines. If you are selling an 



item and wish to have more time to 
drive up the price, move down from 
the Sell position immediately follow- 
ing the start of the auction. Keep 
moving until another player is above 
the Buy line. Return to Sell status 
and wait until the last second to sell. 
— ALEX SHAKAR, 1 7. Brooklyn, New 
York 

SPACE TAXI. Muse (Apple, C 64). 
Arcade/skill. Your mission: to carry 
people to and from the various hot 
spots in your 23rd-ccntury metropo- 
lis. 

^^^ On the Beanstalk level, move 
as quickly as you can to pad one: 
land as far right as you can. 
If you manage to pick up your 
passenger before pads two and three 
finish growing, your passenger will 

ask to go "up." — FRED RIDING, 13, 

Roosevelt, Utah 

We need a few good hints! Help K- 
POWER readers be all that they can be 
by sending us hints for your favorite 
games. We have all of the Zorfc and 
Ultima HI hints we can handle, but 
we'll gladly print and pay SlO for 
good hints we haven't published yet. 
Just put your full name (no aliases, 
please), complete mailing address, 
phone number, and birthdate on the 
letter with your hints, and send 
them to Hint Hotline, c/o k-power, 
730 Broadway, New York, NY, 10003, 
We can't print your hints unless we 
have all of the above information, 
nor can we answer specific game 
questions by mail. We hope to hear 
from you soon! (Note: the computer 
systems listed in brackets indicate 
the computer versions the hints 
work for.) 



JANUARY 1986 83 




MUSIC PROG RAMS 
BY JOEY LATIMER 



In the past few years. 
there's been renewed inter- 
est In the musical styles or 
the '50s. Back then, "nat 
tops with fenders" were in 
, . . musicians wore leather 
jackets and carried combs 
in their back pockets . . . 
and now it's all come 
'round again! While most 

of the recording artists of the '50s have faded away, some 
still shine. People like Chuck Berry, B.B. King, Chubby 
Checker, and Fabian arc still playing the music that 
made them famous, and sounding better than ever. 

This month's Microtones is a tribute to those great 
stars and their music. It's called Old-Time Rock 'n' Roll. 
The song was transferred, note for note, from guitar, and 
reflects some popular licks from '50s classics like Chuck 
Berry's immortal "Johnny B. Goode." If you like what you 
hear, then hop on down to the local record store and ask 
the clerk for some "Old-Time Rock 'n" Roll!" 

Hackers' note: If you prefer blues to rock 'n' roll, try 
slowing the song down , as shown in the rem statement. 




M 



ATARI 400, 800, 600/800XL, & 130XE/OiD- 
TIME ROCK'N'ROLL 



10 DIM V1(102,2),V2{67,2:i,V3C30,2):GRAPHICS 1+16 

20 FOR 1=1 TO 102:REA[) A,B: V1(I,1)=A; VI CI,2)=B: NEXT I 

30 FOR 1=1 TO 67:READ A,B: V2 C 1,1 )=A: V2 (I,2)=B: NEXT 1 

40 FOR 1=1 TO 30:READ A,B: V3CI,1 )=A: V3<I,2)=B:NEXT I 

50 FOR :=243 TO 1 STEP -1 

60 SOUND 1,I,6,4:S0UHt) 2, (1+2), 8, 4 

70 SETCOLOR 4,INT(I/16),I-INT(I/16)*16 

80 FOR DE=1 TO I/12:NEXT DEiNEXT I 

90 POSITION 0,10;PRINT #6;"0LD-TIHE ROCK'N'ROLL" 

100 P1=1:P2=1:P3=1:T1=0:T2=0:T3=0:DR=2 

110 IF P1>17 AND DR=3 THEN SOUND 0,15,8,12 

120 SOUND 1,V1(P1,1),10,8:SOUNO 2,V2CPZ,1 ),10,8 

130 SOUND 3,V3(P3,1),10,8:POKE 708,INTaP1/103)*240)+8 

139 REM --FOR BLUES, CHANGE "30" TO "100" IN LINE 140— 

U0 FOR DE=1 TO 30: NEXT D£ 



150 DR=DR+1:1F DR=5 THEN DR=1 
160 T1=T1+1:IF T1=V1{P1,2) THEN T1=0:P1=P1+1 
170 T2=T2+1:IF T2=V2CP2,2) THEN T2=0:P2=P2+1 
180 T3=T3+1:IF T3=V3CP3,2) THEN T3=0:P3=P3+1 
190 SOUND 0,0,0,0: SOUND 1,0,0,0 
200 SOUND 2,0,0,0:SOUND 3,0,0,0 
210 IF PK103 THEN 110 
220 GOTO 100 

100» DATA 47,1,40,1,35,1,29,5,47,1,40,1,35,1,29,5 
1010 DATA 47,1,40,1,35,1,29,5,35,1,40,1,50,1,33,4 
1020 DATA 35,1,40,1,50,1,60,1,40,1,33,2,40,1,33,1 
1030 DATA 40,1,0,1,45,1,40,1,33,2,29,1,40,1,45,1 
1040 DATA 47,1,45,1,40,1,33,2,40,1,33,1,40,1,29,1 
1050 DATA 33,1,40,1,29,1,33,1,40,1,29,1,33,1,40,1 
1060 DATA 29,1,33,1,45,1,50,1,60,1,45,1,50,1,60,2 
1070 DATA 45,1,50,1,60,1,45,1,50,2,60,2,0,1,40,1 
1080 DATA 33,1,42,1,35,1,45,1,37,1,47,1,40,4,0,4 
1090 DATA 29,1,0,2,29,3,35,1,40,1,29,1,0,2,29,3 
1100 DATA 35,1,40,1,29,2,35,2,40,2,35,2,29,2,35,2 
1110 DATA 40,2,35,2,29,1,0,2,29,3,35,1,40,1,29,1 
1120 DATA 0,2,29,3,35,1,40,1,128,8,64,5 
2000 DATA 0,3,40,5,0,3,40,5,0,3,40,5,45,1,50,1 
2010 DATA 60,1,40,4,45,1,50,1,60,2,121,2,108,2 
2020 DATA 102,2,108,2,121,2,108,2,102,2,108,2 
2030 DATA 162,2,144,2,136,2,144,2,162,2,144,2 
2040 DATA 136, 2, 128, 2, 108, 2, 96, 2, 108,2, 96, 2, 121, £ 
2050 DATA 108,2,102,2,108,2,162,2,144,2,136,2,144 
2060 DATA 2,108,4,0,4,121,2,108,2,102,2,108,2,121 
2070 DATA 2,108,2,102,2,108,2,162,2,144,2,136,2 
2080 DATA 144,2,162,2,144,2,136,2,128,2,121,2,10!; 
2090 DATA 2,121,2,108,2,121,2,108,2,121,4,108,13 
3000 DATA 0,3,243,1,0,7,50,5,0,3,243,1,0,3 
3010 DATA 243,1,0,3,162,4,182,1,204,1,243,2,182 
3020 DATA 16,243,10,217,2,204,2,193,2,162 
3030 DATA 8,182,8,243,8,162,4,0,4,182,16,243,10 
3040 DATA 217,2,204,2,193,2,182,16,162,13 



M 



COMMODORE 64 & 1 28 (C 64 t^ODE)/OLD- 
TIME ROCK'N'ROLL 

10 DIH V1C102,3),V2C67,3),V3(30,3) 

20 S=54272:F0R 1=0 TO 23:P0KE S+I,0:NEXT 1 

30 POKE S+24,15:P0KE S+5,100;POKE S+6,100 

40 POKE S+12,10a:POKE S+13,100 

50 FOR 1=1 TO 102:READ VI a,1),V1 CI,2J,VUI,3) :NEXT I 

60 FOR 1=1 TO 67; READ V2(I,1 ),V2 Cl,2),V2CI,3) :NE<T I 

70 FOR 1=1 TO 30:READ V3(I,1 ),V3<I,2),V3CI,3) : NEtT 1 

80 PRINT CHR$C147);:P0KE S+4,129:P0KE S+11,129 

90 FOR 1 = 1 TO 80:POKE S+1,I:P0KE S+B,! 

100 POKE 53281, IIJTCRNDC1)*13)+2 

110 FOR DE=1 TO 81-I:NEXT DE:NEXT I 

120 POKE 3+4,0:POK£ S+11,0 

130 POKE S+5,9:POKE S+6,15:P0KE S+12,9 

140 POKE S+13,15:P0KE S+19,9:P0KE S+20,15 

150 POKE 53281, 0:POKE 214,10:PRINT 

160 PRINT TABC9);CHR$(5);"0LD-TIHE ROCK 'N' ROLL" 

170 P1=1:P2=1:P3=1:T1=0:T2=0:T3=0:DR=2 

180 POKE S+1,V1CP1,1):P0KE S,V1<P1,2) 

190 POKE S+8,V2CP2,1):P0KE S+7,V2(P2,2) 

200 POKE S+15,V3(P3,1):P0Ke S+14,V3(P3,2) 

210 POKE S+18,33-96*(P1>17 AND DR=3) 

220 POKE S+4,33:P0KE S+11,33 

230 POKE 53280,INT(RND(1)*13)+2 

239 REM —FOR BLUES, CHANGE "3" TO "175" IN LINE 240— 

240 FOR DE=1 TO 3:NEXT DE 
250 POKE S+4,32:P0KE S+11,32 

260 POKE S+18,32-96*(P1>17 AND DR=3) 

270 DR=DR+1:IF DR=5 THEN DR=1 

280 T1 = T1+1:IF T1=V1(P1,3) THEN T1=0:P1=P1+1 

290 T2=T2+1:IF T2=V2<P2,3) THEN T2=0:P2=P2+1 

300 T3=T3+1:IF T3=V3(P3,3) THEN T3=0;P3=P3+1 

310 POKE St4,0:POKE S+11,0:POKE S+18,0 » 



84 FAMILY COMPUTiNG 



The only software your 
home computer really needs. 



4< 



13 of the most useful 

software programs on 

one disk for less than $50. 

THE WORKS!'" gives you 13 use- 
ful home programs: better Writer 
for word processing. Typing 
Teacher, Famil} Finances, (Calen- 
dar Pad, Address Book, Stock Port- 
folio, Loans &In\estnients, Music 
(x)niposer. Cirapiiics Painter, Cal- 
culator, Math Formulas, Weights & 




Measures and Math Races. Pro- 
grams that, if bought separately, 
would cost you hundreds (jf dol- 
lars and hours of time to leiirn. 
THE WORKS! easy to read in- 
structions plus "quick reference 
card" and on-screen helj:* means 
\'ou can start using the program 
with \ (Hir computer immediately. 
No gimmicks, no games. 

Easy, inexpensive and complete. 



""There's noOfing like THE WORKS! 




For the Apple 1 1 series with 64K and Commodore 64, 1 28. Printer and Second Disk Drive optional. 

THE WORKS' and A Complete Cdleclion of Home Soliwafe are trademarks o1 First Star Software, Inc. Apple and Commodore 64 1 28 are registerefl trademarks of Apple Computer Corp, and 
Commodore Business Macfiines. Inc. respectively. Copytight 19B5, First Star Software, Inc. te East 4ist Street. New Yorti. New Yorfi 1D0t7. All rigtits reserved, Pnnied in ttw U.S.A. 

CIRCLE READER SERVICE 18 



320 If P1<ia3 THEN 1 8» 
330 GOTO 17a 

18W DATA 'iZ, 62, 1,5B,6»,1, 56, 98,1, 67, 14,5,42,62 
iai8 DATA 1,50,60,1,56,98,1,67,14,5,42,62,1,5b 
1020 DATA 60,1,56,98,1,67,14,5,56,98,1,50,60,1 
1030 DATA 39,222,1,59,190,4,56,98,1,50,60,1,39,222 
1040 DATA 1,33,134,1,50,60,1,59,190,2,50,60,1,59 
1050 DATA 190,1,50,60,1,0,0,1,44,192,1,50,60,1 
1060 DATA 59,190,2,67,14,1,50,60,1,44,192,1,42,62 
1070 DATA 1,44,192,1,50,60,1,59,190,2,50,60,1,59 
1080 DATA 190,1,50,60,1,67,14,1,59,190,1,50,60,1 
1090 DATA 67,14,1,59,190,1,50,60,1,67,14,1,59,190 
1100 DATA 1,50,60,1,67,14,1,59,190,1,44,192,1,39 
1110 DATA 222,1,33,134,1,44,192,1,39,222,1,33,134,2 
1120 DATA 44,192,1,39,222,1,33,134,1,44,192,1,39,222 
1130 DATA 2,33,134,2,0,0,1,50,60,1,59,190,1,47 
1140 DATA 106,1,56,98,1,44,192,1,53,56,1,42,62,1 
1150 DATA 50,60,4,0,0,4,67,14,1,0,0,2,67,14 
1160 DATA 3,56,98,1,50,60,1,67,14,1,0,0,2,67 
1170 DATA 14,3,56,98,1,50,60,1,67,14,2,56,98,2 
1180 DATA 50,60,2,56,98,2,67,14,2,56,98,2,50,60 
1190 DATA 2,56,98,2,67,14,1,0,0,2,67,14,3,56 
1200 DATA 98,1,50,60,1,67,14,1,0,0,2,67,14,3 
1210 DATA 56,98,1,50,60,1,15,210,8,31,164,5 
2000 DATA 0,0,3,50,60,5,0,0,3,50,60,5,0,0 
2010 DATA 3,50,60,5,44,192,1,39,222,1,33,134,1,50 
2020 DATA 60,4,44,192,1,39,222,1,33,134,2,16,194,2 
2030 DATA 18,208,2,19,238,2,18,208,2,16,194,2,18,208 
2040 DATA 2,19,238,2,18,208,2,12,143,2,14,50,2,14 
2050 DATA 238,2,14,50,2,12,143,2,14,50,2,14,238,2 
2060 DATA 15,210,2,18,208,2,21,30,2,18,208,2,21,30 
2070 DATA 2,16,194,2,18,208,2,19,233,2,18,208,2,12 
2080 DATA 143,2,14,50,2,14,238,2,12,143,2,18,208,4 
2090 DATA 0,0,4,16,194,2,18,208,2,19,238,2,18,208 
2100 DATA 2,16,194,2,18,208,2,19,238,2,18,208,2,12 
2110 DATA 143,2,14,50,2,14,238,2,14,50,2,12,143,2 
2120 DATA 14,50,2,14,238,2,15,210,2,16,194,2,18,208 
2130 DATA 2,16,194,2,18,208,2,16,194,2,18,208,2,16 
2140 DATA 194,4,18,208,13 
3000 DATA 0,0,3,4,48,1,0,0,7,39,222,5,0,0 
3010 DATA 3,4,48,1,0,0,3,4,48,1,0,0,3,6 
3020 DATA 71,4,5,152,1,4,251,1,4,48,2,5,152,16 
3030 DATA 4,48,10,4,180,2,4,251,2,5,71,2,6,71 
3040 DATA 8,5,152,8,4,48,8,6,71,4,0,0,4,5 
3050 DATA 152,16,4,48,10,4,180,2,4,251,2,5,71,2 
3060 DATA 5,152,16,6,71,13 



a_ 



IBM PC/rW/CARTRIDGE BASIC & TV OR 
MONITOR W/SPEAKER/0£D-rM4£ ROCK 'N' 
ROLL 

10 SOUND ON:BE£P OFF:WIDTH 40:KEY OFF:CLS 

1 5 8$="" : CS="" : DS="" : E$="" : FS="" : 6$="" 

20 FOR 1=1 TO 5:READ A$:B$=BS+A$:NEXT I 

30 FOR 1=1 TO 3:REA0 A$: C$=C$+A$:N£XT I 

40 FOR 1=1 TO 4:READ A$: DS=DI+A$: NEXT 1 

50 FOR 1=1 TO 3:REA0 A$:E$=ES+A$:NEXT 1 

60 FOR 1 = 1 TO 4:REA0 AS: F$=F$+A$:NEXT I 

70 FOR 1=1 TO 3:READ AI:GS=GI+A$:NEXT I 

75 LOCATE 10,7,0 

76 PRINT "*OLD-TIHE ROCK 'N' ROLL*" 

80 PLAY B$,D$,F$:PLAY C$,E$,G$: GOTO 80 

998 REM —FOR BLUES, CHANGE "t100" TO "t32"— 

999 REM —IN LINES 1000, 2000, AND 3000— 

1000 DATA t100l16o4egao5ccccco4egao5ccccco4ega 
1010 DATA o5ccccco4afilgea#a#a#3#3gdfi(<:ga#a#galf 
1020 DATA gp16fgatfa#oSco4gfd#f9a#a#g3#goSco4 
1030 DATA a#9o5co4a#9o5eo4a#go5co4a#fd#cfd#c 
1040 DATA c-fd#cfd#d#ccp16ea#dac#g#c9999p4 
1050 DATA O5cp8ccco4ago5cp8ccco4ago5cco4ap16 
1060 DATA gp16a9a#a#aggg9go5cp8ccco4a9o5cp8c 
1070 DATA cco4a9o2bbbbbbbbo3bbbbp16 

2000 DATA t100L16o4p8.gg9ggp8.gggggp8.g9gggfd# 



2010 


DATA 


2020 


DATA 


2030 


DATA 


2040 


DATA 


2050 


DATA 


3000 


DATA 


3010 


DATA 


3020 


DATA 


3030 


DATA 


3040 


DATA 


3050 


DATA 



cg999fd#cco2ccdddfldf/ddccddd#d#ddo1 

ggaaa//a#aaggaaa#at'bbo2ddeeddeeccdd 

d#d(!(ddo1g9aaa#a#aao2ddddp4,ccddd#d# 

ddccddd#d#ddo1ggaaa#a#aaggaaa#afbb 

o2ccddccddccddcccScSddddddddddddp16 

t100L16o1p8.cp4p8.o4d#d#d#d#d#p8. 

0lcp8.cp8.ggggfd#ccffffff-fffffff-ff-f 

ccccccccccdddffd^eeggggggggff f f f f'ff 

cccccccc9gggp4,ffffffffffffffff 

ccccccccccddd#d#eefffffff-tffffffff 

999999g9999gp''6 



M. 



TANDY COLOR COtAPUlERJ OLD-TIME ROCK 'N' 
ROLL 



10 DIM SK68,2) 

20 CLS 

30 FOR 1=1 TO 68 

40 READ N<I,1),NCI, 

50 NEXT I 

60 PRINT a196,"*0LD 

70 P=1:T=1 

79 REM —FOR BLUES, 

80 SOUND NCP,n,2 
90 IF T=N(P,2) THEN 
100 IF P<68 THEN P=l 
110 GOTO 70 

1000 DATA 227,1,232 
1010 DATA 236,1,225 
1020 DATA 236,1,232 
1030 DATA 225,1,218 
1040 DATA 176,2,185 
1050 DATA 165,2,159 
1060 DATA 185,2,193 
1070 DATA 176,2,185 
1080 DATA 193,2,147 
1090 DATA 210,2,204 
1100 DATA 210,2,197 
1110 DATA 223,4,232 



2> 

-TIME ROCK 'N' ROLL*" 

CHANGE "2" TO "6" IN LINE 80— 

T=1 ELSE T=T+1:G0T0 80 
P+1:G0T0 80 



,1,236,1, 

,5,227,1, 
,1,225,1, 
,1,176,2, 
,2,189,2, 
,2,147,2, 
,2,185,2, 
,2,176,1, 
,7,197,10 
,2,210,2, 
,10,193,1 
,1 



240,5 
232,1 
237,4 
185,2 
185,2 
159,2 
193,2 
204,2 
,193, 
218,2 
,197, 



,227,1 
,236,1 
,236,1 
,189,2 
,147,2 
,165,2 
,176,2 

,2(»«,2 
1,197, 
,210,2 
5,204, 



,232,1 

,240,5 

,232,1 

,185,2 

,159,2 

,159,2 

,185,2 

,197,2 

5,216,2 

,204,2 

4,216,4 



MICRONOTES 



So you love k-power's music programs, but your com- 
puter sounds crummy? Besc Corporation may have the 
product of your dreams: the RoomMate siKaker system. 
This compact setup works with any sound source that 
has a headphone or phono Jack, from TVs and VCRs to 
(yes!) electronic keyboards and computers. It's S229 for 
the Commodore Amiga, Apple Macintosh, and Apple He. 
Here's to better sound! . . . Speaking of sound, what 
about voice synthesis for the C 64/128? Welwyn Currah 
says its new product — The Vfoicc Messenser — will turn 
your imagination Into words for S59.95. Combined ivith 
another package called Easy Speech (824.95). The Voice 
Messenger can make your adventure games "talk"! 

Apple and IBM users interested in sound s>Tithcsis 
should look into SynPhonix products from Arlic Technol- 
ogies. The products are pretty techy, but start below 
S200 and can do some amazing things In the electrcnic 
speech department . 



86 FAMILY COMPUTING 



WHAT'S IN STORE 

NEW HARDWARE ANNOUNCEMENTS 



BY NICK SULLIVAN 



MONITORS 

Thomson CM 36512 Vi 

MANUFACTURER: Thomson Consumer 

Products Corp. 

ADDRESS: 330 Washington St.. Suite 

509, Marina Del Rey. CA 90292; 

(213) 821-2995 

price: $429 

Thomson, an American subsidiary of 
the $2 billion French electronics 
concern, Thomson Grand Public. 
has a whole line of computer moni- 
tors for professional and home use. 
One that straddles both markets is 
the CM 36512. which is a combina- 
tion RGB/composite color monitor. 
Because it can accept both inputs, it 
can be used with virtually any com- 
puter — Apple, Atari. Commodore, 
and TI in composite mode, and Ap- 
ple. IBM, and Tandy (with appropri- 
ate interfaces) in RGB mode. The 
monitor has an internal speaker and 
a switch that selects amber or green 
text. 




If your computer isn't capable of 
RGB output, of course, this monitor 
may not be the right choice, unless 
you plan on eventually getting an 
RGB-ready computer. 

COMPUTERS 

Franklin Ace 2000 Series 

MANUFACTURER: Franklin Computer 

ADDRESS: Route 73, Haddonfield Rd., 

Pennsauken. NJ 08110: (609) 488- 

0666 

PRICE: S699 to S999 

Franklin Computer Corp., success- 
fully sued by Apple for making com- 
puters that infringed on Apple's 
copjTight. has apparently recovered 
from its "corporate turmoil, "as Chief 
Executive Officer Morton David puts 
it. As proof Franklin has introduced 
three new computers that run the 
"most popular" software for the Ap- 




ple, including AppleWorks. Super- 
Calc 3a. the PFS series, and Flight 
Simulator II. The 65SC02 micro- 
processor is "functionally identical" 
to the 65C02 used in the new Apple 
lie and lie. Franklin's promise, as in 
the past, is to give you more ma- 
chine for your money than Apple 
and access to the huge Apple soft- 
ware base. 

The Franklin Ace 2200 (S999) has 
two built-in disk drives. The 2100 
(S849) has one built-in drive, and the 
2000 (S699) has no drive. All models 
have 128K of user memors'. a paral- 
lel printer port, 40- and 80-column 
screen displays, a numeric keypad, 
and 1 2 programmable function keys. 
The function keys are preset with 12 
often-used DOS commands. The key- 
board uses a standard IBM Selectric 
layout and is detachable. Nine spe- 
cial BASIC editing keys provide stan- 
dard commands such as clear 

SCFiEEN, HOME, DELETE CHARACTER, etc. 

A high-resolution Franklin moni- 
tor with a tilt-and-swivel base is 
available for SI 39. Two expansion 
slots are left open for Franklin- and 
Apple-compatible plug-in cards. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

G'Wiz Interface (Commodore) 
MANUFACTURER: Cardco Inc. 
ADDRESS: 300 S.Topeka. Wichita, KS 
67202; (316) 267-3807 
PRICE: S69 

To use a non-Commodore printer 
with a Commodore computer, you 
need a third-party printer interface. 
Cardco, maker of the best-selling 
+ G interface, has introduced an im- 
proved model: the G-Wiz. It plugs 
into the VIC-20. C 64. and C 128. 
and comes with all cables and con- 
nectors to hook up serial and paral- 
lel printers. 

While it will work with most print- 
ers, the G-Wiz is designed specifical- 
ly for Epson, Okidata, C. Itoh, and 



Seikosha dot-matrix printers. On let- 
ter-quality printers, you won't get 
the special Commodore characters 
and graphics. The G-Wiz has a self- 
test mode to check whether the 
switches arc set correctly for the 
connected printer. 

According to Cardco, the G-Wiz 
can "dump" graphics to a printer 
faster than any other interface. 



Robotic Computing Kit 

MANUFACTURER: Fischer America Inc. 
ADDRESS: 175 Route 46 W.. Fairfield, 
NJ 07006: (201) 227-9283 
PRICE: SI 99 




Fischer America calls it the "erector 
set of the eighties" and the "chemis- 
try set of the computer age." What- 
ever it's called, the FischerTechnik 
Robotic Computing Kit contains all 
the elements needed to learn about 
and develop skills in computer-aided 
robotics. The kit includes electrome- 
chanical parts, software, and an in- 
terface unit for Apple II or Com- 
modore 64 and 'VIC-20 computers. 

With two minimotors, two gears, 
an electromagnet, three lamps, eight 
pushbuttons, and two potentiome- 
ters, the kit can be made into at 
least 10 different models. These in- 
clude "traffic light with pedestrian 
button." "machine tool," "materials 
lift," "Towers of Hanoi," and "solar 
cell tracking" models. Each model 
has a set of experiments that teach 
you various aspects of computer 
control. The solar cell tracking mod- 
el, for instance, can be programmed 
to maintain a constant angle toward 
the sun. 

Building instructions and wiring 
plans are provided, as are simple 
BASIC programs to help you auto- 
mate your robot model. The product 
is an offshoot of Fischer Internation- 
al's research on industrial robotics. Bj 



JANUARY 1986 87 



WHATS IN STORE 






SOrrWARE GUIDE 






QUICK TAKES ON SOFTWA 


PF 








ixC 




NEW AND NOTEWORTHY 






Welcome to FAMILY COMPUTING'S Software Guide, the 


limitations and capacities of the particular computer 


most comprehensive listing available of two dozen of 


for which the software is intended. 1 


D = 


the newest, most noteworthy, and/or best programs on 


Documentation, or the instructions and literature thot | 


the market. Our reviewers include families from all 


accompany a program. EH = Error- 


handling, the 


over the country who have judged the software 


softwore's capacity to accommodate 


errors made by 


according to the following criteria: long-term benefits 


the user — on especially innportant considerotion wit-i 


and applications, adoptability, and advantages of 


software for younger users. PS = Ploy system, in the 


using computer for a given tosk. Minimum memory 


gomes reviews, the quality of the gome design and 


requirements are: 48K for Apple II series; 48K for 


the game's playability, CQ = Graphics quality, also 


Atari; 128K for IBM PC/PC/r or compatibles; and 128K 


evaluated in light of each particular 


brand's graphics 


for Mocinfosh. More detailed reviews follow the chart. 


capabilities. EU = Ease of use after 


the initial 


Unless otherwise noted, all programs ore in disk format 


learning period, which varies from computer to | 


Here's a rundown of the rating categories and what 


computer. V = Value for money, or 


how the software 


they mean: O = Overall performance, given the 


measures up to its price. 




HOME BUSINESS & PRODUCTIVITY 


Title 




Hardware/ 






Publisher 


Brief 


Equipment 


Backup 


Ratings 


Price 


description 


required 


policy 


o 


D 


EH 


GQ 


Ell V 


BANK STREET MAILER 


This combination letter-writer 


Reviewed on Apple lie. 


90-day 


* 


* 


* 


N/A 


E * 


Broderbund Software 


and mailing-list program lives 


Also for 128K Apple He; 


warranty: S7.50 


* 


* 


* 






* 


17 Paul Drive 


up to the high standards set by 


separate version for thereafter: user 


* 


* 


* 




* 


San Rafael. CA 94903 


other Sank: S(ree( software. 


64K Apple. 


can make one 


it 


* 


* 








(415)479-1170 


Produce personalized form 




backup. 














S70 ei985 


letters with ease.* — morgekstern 


















HOME DATA MANAGER 


An easy-to-learn information 


64K Apple. Second 


60-day 


* 


* 


• 


N/A 


E 


* 


Polarwarc/Penguln 


filing program, with a 


drive and printer 


warranty; $5 


* 


* 


* 






* 


Software Inc. 


respectable report function for 


recommended. 


thereafter: user 


* 


* 








• 


830 Fourth Ave. 


presenting your data. Its low 




makes backup. 














Geneva. IL 60134 


cost and menu-driven 


















(312) 232-1984 


commands make it suitable for 


















S45 ©1985 


novices. ■— wii^ON 


















NUTRl-CALC 


Tell the computer what you've 


Reviewed on 


90-day 


■k 


* 


* 


N/A 


E 


* 


CAMDE Corp. 


eaten. It then tracks and 


Macintosh. Also for 


warranty: $5 


* 


* 


* 






* 


46 Prince St. 


analyzes your diet with an eye 


Apple: IBM PC/PCjr. 


for backup. 


* 


* 


* 








Rochester, NY 14607 


towards improving it. Includes 


















(716) 473-5330 


an extensive data base of all 


















S80 (Mac): 


types of foods. — ^aker 


















$100 (Apple. IBM) ©1985 




















ORTHOS 


A data base of 750 different 


Reviewed on IBM PC- 


90-day 


* 


• 


* 


N/A 


E 


* 


COMPUTERIZED 


plants. Each can be listed by 


compatible. Also for 


warranty; user 


* 


* 


* 






* 


GARDENING 


type, water and soil 


Apple lle/llc: C 64; IBM 


makes backup. 


* 


* 


• 






* 


Onho Information 


requirements, color, and specific 


PC. 
















Seriices 


regional needs. Use this program 


















575 Market St. 


to organize your landscaping. 


















San Francisco, CA 94105 


but you'll need more to teach 


















(415)894-0277 


you how to garden. — RASKIN 


















S50 ei984 




















WILLWRITER 


Draw up your own will with the 


Reviewed on Apple. ; 30-day 


* 


* 


* 


N/A 


E 


* 


Nolo Press 


help of this fully legal software. 


Also for C 64/128; 


warranty: user 


* 


* 


* 






* 


950 Parker St. 


Prompts you through the 


IBM PC/ PCjr and 


makes backup: 


* 


* 


■k 






* 


Berkeley. CA 94710 


language of wills in easy steps 


256K compatibles: 


updates 


■k 


• 


* 








(415) 549-1976 


designed for the layman.* 


Macintosh. Printer 


available for 2 














S40C1985 


— ZORNBEHC 


required. 


years. 














WORD MASTER SR, 


This is so simple a word 


Reviewed on C 64. Also 


Unlimited 


* 


* 


* 


N/A 


i; 


* 


Green Valley 


processor, it doesn't even come 


for C 128. 


warrant}': user 


* 


* 


* 






* 


Publishing, Inc. 


with a manual. Easy to use and 




makes backup. 




* 


* 






• 


7122 Shady Oak Road 


incredibly Inexpensive: it has 
















* 


Eden Prairie, MN 55344 


online help and a sample letter 


















(800) 328-6061 


feature. Perfect for 1-3 pages. 


















S5 ©1985 


— AMATO 


















RATINGS KIT O 0\-eraJl performance: D EJocumcntallon: VH Error-handllrlil: 9Q Gr 


aphlcs quallh': EU Ease of use; ¥ Value for mone>'; * Poor: 


♦* Average: *** Ciiod: 


**+* Excellcni; NA .N'ot applicable: E Easy; A Avcraffi^: D Dimcult: * Longer ro'lfw lollou-s 


Chan 





88 F/kMILY COMS'UTING 





EDUCATION/FUN LEARNING 


Title 

Publisher 

Price 


Brief 
description 


Hardware/ 
Equipmenl 
required 


Backup 
policy 


e 


p 


tati 
EH 


nga 
CQ 


EU 


V 


ANIMAL PHOTO FUN 
DLM Software 
One DLM Park 
Allen, TX 75002 
(214) 248-6300 
S30©1985 


Discover the habitats of 36 
animals In six photo-expedition 
games. Good for prereaders up 
to early grades. Parents may 
need lo explain the concepts at 

first. — nUMGARNEH Kl.TGROTH 


Apple; color monitor 
recommended. 


6-month 
warranty; S15 
thereafter or for 
backup. 


* 
* 
* 


* 
* 
* 


* 


* 
* 

* 
* 


E 


* 
* 


CLOWNING AROUND 
Panda/Learning 
Technologies, Inc. 
4255 LBJ Freeway, 
Suite 131 
Dallas, TX 75244 
(2141 991-4958 
S20 ©1985 


Make your clown marionette 
move objects, such as frutt or 
fish, to their original positions 
on-screen. Challenges visual 
discrimination and memory 
skills up to age 10. 

—UUMGABNER ELTCROTH 


Reviewed on Apple. 
Also for C 64. Color 
monitor recommended. 


Unlimited 
warranty. 


* 
* 
* 


* 
* 


* 

* 
* 


* 

■k 


A 


* 
* 

* 
* 

* 
* 


THE GREAT GONZO 

IN WORD RIDER 

Simon & Schuster 

! 230 Ave. of the Americas 

New Yorlt, NY 10020 

(2121 245-6400 

835 (Applet; 

S30 (C 64) €1985 


Early readers match nouns and 
adjectives in a game dtflicutt for 
the young and loo "young" for 
the proficient. A delightful. 20- 
page "Muppet" storybook, full of 
chicken jokes, is the high point 
of this package. — summers 


Reviewed on Apple. 
Also for C 64. 


30-day 
warranty: S5 
thereafter. 


* 

* 


* 
* 
* 


* 
* 
* 
* 


* 
* 
* 
* 


A 


THE HALLEY PROJECT 
Mindscape, inc. 
3444 Dundee Road 
Northbrook. IL 60062 
(312) 480-7667 
S40-S45 © 1985 


Navigate a spacecraft around our 
solar system on 10 secret 
missions. The sooner you know 
the constellations, the better in 
this learning game for ages 

I0 + .+ — SUMMERS 


Reviewed on C 64. Also 
for Amiga; Apple; Atari; 
C 128. Joystick. 


90-day 
warranty. 


* 
* 
* 


* 
* 
* 


* 
* 

* 


* 

* 
* 


A 


* 
* 
* 
* 


LB. MAGAZETTE 
LB. Magazette, Inc. 
1306 Petroleum Tower 
Shreveport. LA 71 101 

(318) 222-8088 
S15 each; S150/year 
ei985 


A monthly collection of programs 
on disk. Contents vary from the 
useful (lax-deduction record- 
keeper) to the purely 
recreational. Also gives 
instructions in BASIC . An 
unpolished, but fun package. 

— nUMGAKNER ELTGROTH 


IBM PC/XT/PCjr and 
compatibles. 


Unlimited 
warranty; S5 if 
user-damaged: 
user makes 
backup. 


* 
* 
* 


N/A 


* 
* 


* 
* 
* 


E 


* 
* 


LEAPS AND BOUNDS 
Muse Software 
347 N. Charles St. 
Baltimore. MD 21201 
(301) 659-7212 
S40ei985 


Toddler-frlendly software tor 
ages 3-8. A counting game and 
an alphabet game are enhanced 
with offbeat animation. Special 
"tape-recorder" feature In the art 
and music sections. t — summers 


Reviewed on C 64. Also 

for Apple: 3 2K Atari; 
C 128: IBM PC/PCjr. 


Unlimited 
warranty; SIO 
for backup. 


* 
* 

* 
* 


* 
* 

* 


* 
* 
♦ 
* 


* 
* 
* 

* 


E 


* 
* 
* 
* 


SEA SPELLER 
Flsher-Price, 
Div. of Spinnaker 
One Kendall Square 
Cambridge, MA 02139 
(6171494-1200 
$20-$25 ©1984 


Practice spelling and reading 
skills in this race-the-clock 
underwater adventure. Well- 
crafted graphics and sound 
effects entertain without 
distracting. For children reading 
at grade levels 1-4. —summers 


Reviewed on C 64 
(cart,). Also for Apple; 
C 64/128 (disk); IBM 
PC/ PCjr. Joystick. 


30-day 
warranty; S5 
thereafter. 


* 

* 
* 

* 


* 
* 

* 


* 
* 
* 
* 


* 
* 
* 


E 


* 

* 
* 

* 


WALLYS WORD WORKS 

Sunburst 

Commun ications 

39 Washington Ave. 

PleasantviUe, NY 10570 

(914) 769-5030 

S69 Ci 1 985 


Tell Wally the wallaby to pick up 
words from a sentence. Then 
have him drop them in baskets 
representing parts of speech — 
noun, verb. etc. Makes parsing 
of sentences fun for ages 

9-18.i — MORRIS 


Reviewed on Apple. 
Also for Atari: C 64/ 
128. Joystick optional. 


Unlimited 
warranty; 
backup 
included. 


* 

* 

* 
* 


* 
* 
* 


* 
* 

* 
* 


* 
* 
* 


E 


* 

*■ 
* 


RATIHaS KIT O Overall prrfdnnanct.: O Uocumtnlalloii: EH Ermr-lumihn^L SQ Graphics quality: tU Ease a! use; V Value for mone>': *■ PoBr: ** Average: *** Good: 
***+ Excflkni; X A Xol applifable: E Easy; A Average; D Dllfjcult; * Loni^er review fallows chart 



jANU/my 1986 89 



GAMES REVIEWS BY JAMES DELSON 


^^ 


Title 

Publisher 

Price 


Brief 
description 


Hardware/ 
Equipment 
required 


Backup 
policy 


O 


H 
D 


tati 
P$ 


ngs 
GQ 


p 
EU 


V 


BALTIC 1985 

Strategic Simulations, 

Inc. 

883 Stierlm Road, 

Bldg. A-200 

Mountain View, CA 

94043 

(415) 964-1200 

S35 ©1984 


The third game in SSI's "When 
Superpowers Collide" series 
places you In command of the 
forces assigned to forge and hold 
a corridor to reach your troops. 
Updated rules allow faster play; 
for 1-2 players ages 12 -f- . 


Reviewed on Apple. 
Also for C 64/128. 


30-day 

warranty; SlO 
thereafter. 


* 
* 
* 


* 
* 


* 
* 


A 
* 


D 


* 
* 


INTELLECTUAL 
DECATHLON 
Muse Software 
347 N. Charles St. 
Baltimore. MD 21201 
(301)659-7212 
S40 ©1982 


A series of brain-teasers for 1-6 
players. Memorize and recall 
number strings, musical notes, 
pictures, word pairs, mazes, and 
more. Always new combinations 
for sharp minds. Forages 12-f-. 


Apple. 


Unlimited 
warranty: SIO 
for backup. 


* 

* 
* 


* 

* 


* 

* 
* 
* 


* 
* 


D 


* 
* 
* 


OPERATION MARKET 

GARDEN 

Strategic Simulations 
(See above for 
address and phone] 
$50 ©1985 


Exciting, yet heart-rending 
simulation of the abortive Allied 
attempt to end World War II by 
dropping 35.000 paratroopers 
behind German lines. First-rate 
war game for ages 12+ .t 


Reviewed on Apple. 
Also for Atari; C 64, 


30-day 

warranty; S12 
thereafter or for 
backup. 


■k 

* 
* 


* 
* 
* 


* 
* 
* 


* 

* 


D 


* 
* 


RACTER 
Mindscape, Inc. 
3444 Dundee Road 
Northbrook. IL 60062 
(312) 480-7667 
S45 ©1985 


Racier is the home version of a 
sophisticated artificial 
intelligence program. It can 
converse with you about almost 
anything. But be beware — it's 
totally wacky. For ages 10-I-.+ 


Reviewed on IBM PC. 
Also for Apple; 
Macintosh, 


90-day 

warranty: SlO 
thereafter. 


* 
* 

* 


* 

* 
* 


* 

it 

* 
* 


N/A 


E 


* 
* 


ROGUE 

Epyx 

1043 Kiel Court 
Sunnj-vale. CA 94089 
(408) 745-0700 
S27-639 ©1985 


Excellent role-playing strategy/ 
arcade game. Quest through 26 
labyrinth levels, fighting 
monsters while developing your' 
character. Once a character dies, 
you must start over again. For 
ages 10+. 


Reviewed on IBM PC. 
Also for IBM PCjr; 
Macintosh. 


90-day 
warranty: $5 
thercEifter. 


* 
* 
* 


* 
* 
* 


* 

* 


* 
* 


A 


* 
* 


SPY VS SPY 

First Star Software, Inc. 

18 E. 41st St. 

New York, IW 10017 

(212) 532-4666 

S30-S35 ©1984 


Tantalizing game version of the 
Mad magazine comic strip. 
Spies search an embassy, gather 
necessary items, then escape. 
For 1-2 players ages 10+. Both 
gamers can participate at the 
same time. 


Reviewed on C 64. Also 
for Apple; Atari. 
Joystick(s), 


90-day 

warranty; S7 
thereafter. 


* 

* 

* 


* 

* 


* 
* 
* 


* 
* 
* 

* 


E 


* 
* 


SUPER BOWL SUNDAY 

Avalon Hill 

4517 Harford Road 

Baltimore, MD 21214 

(301)254-9200 

S35 ©1985 


Flay with one of 20 past Super 
Bowl teams. 1-2 gamers ages 
12+ choose plays, decide which 
on-screen athletes will execute 
them, then watch fuily animated 
teams play football, + 


C 64, Joystick optional. 


Unlimited 
warranty. 


* 
* 
* 
* 


* 
* 
* 


* 

* 
* 


* 
* 
* 
* 


A 


* 
* 
* 
* 


WINTER GAMES 

Epyx 

(See abouejor 

address and phone) 

S27-S39©1985 


This third title in Epyx's 
Olympic sports/arcade series is 
as good as its predecessors. 1-8 
players participate in 6 events. 
Lifelike graphics and a great play 
system. Forages 10 + . t 


Reviewed on C 64. Also 
for 64K Apple; C 128; 
Macintosh. Joystick. 


90-day 
warranty: S5 

thereafter. 


* 
* 
* 


* 
* 
* 


* 

* 

* 


* 
* 
* 
* 


(«;■ 


* 
* 

* 


WISHBRINGER 

Infocom 

125 CambridgePark Drive 

Cambridge, MA 02140 

(617)492-1031 

$35-640 ©1985 


Become your small town's 
champion. Use your wits and a 
handy-dandy magic stone to 
solve an age-old mystery, and 
make the place fit again for 
decent folks. Splendid 
introductory text-only adventure 
suitable for ages 12 + . 


Reviewed on Apple. 
Also for Atari; C 64; 
IBM PC and 
compatibles: 
Macintosh; Tandy 
Model HI. 


90-day 

warranty; S5 
thereafter. 


* 
* 
* 


* 


* 
* 
* 


N/A 


D 


* 


WIZARD OF WALL 

STREET 

Synapse 

17 Paul Drive 

San Rafael, CA 94903 

(415)479-1170 

S45©1985 


Buy and sell stocks and stock 
options, get reports on 
companies you want to invest In, 
watch the ticker tape, and chart 
your progress. Three skill levels, 
forages 12+. 


Reviewed on IBM PC. 
Also for IBM XT/PCjr 
and compatibles. 


90-day 

warranty; S7.50 
thereafter. 


* 
* 
* 


* 
* 


* 
* 


* 

* 


l> 


* 


RATtHGS KIT Overall perforniancc; D Documenlallon; P« Play sjslcm: CO Graphics quallly: IV Ease or uw: V Value for money; * Poor: ** AvtraSe; *** Gtod: 
**** Exctllenl; N;A Sol applicable: E Ea5\-: A Average; D Dlfflcult: (S Easy 10 dlfflcult. depending on evtnl; t Longer rcvicv: follon-5 chart 



90 FAMILY COMPUTING 



WHAT'S IN STORE 



SOFTWARE REVIEWS 



On the following pages, you'll find 
in-depth reviews of some of the pro- 
grams listed in the Software Guide. 
Refer back to the Guide on page 
88 for information such as backup 
policies and addresses of software 
publishers. 



HOME BUSINESS 
& PRODUCYIVITY 



Bank Street Mailer 

HARDWAFiE REQUIREMENTS: 128K Apple 

Ile/IIc. Separate version for 64K Ap- 
ple. 
PUBLISHER: Broderbund Software 

PRICE: S70 

Bank Street software has a reputa- 
tion for ease of use and uncluttered, 
functional design. This latest Bank 
Street entry', a combination letter- 
writing and mailing-list program, 
lives up to the high standards set by 
its predecessors. 

Thanks to a well-organized, inter- 
active tutorial on the flip side of the 
program disk, getting started is 
easy. To make the most of the pro- 
gram's features, read the clear and 
logical manual. Finally, on-screen 
help is readily available while using 
the program. 

A specialized writing program 
within Bank Street Mailer expedites 
your correspondence. Essential 
word-processing functions are aug- 
mented by an on-screen menu which 
inserts the basic parts of a letter — 
the opening, closing, date, and re- 
turn address — with a single key- 
stroke. 

The mailing-list program offers 
nine easy, preset categories (first 
name, last name, company, address, 
etc.). You can also employ the mail- 
ing list as a data base by adding up 
to six categories to each record. In- 
clude anything — from birthdays and 
pets' names to credit histories and 
an accounts-receivable status — and 
then merge that information into 
your correspondence. 

Simple commands let you sort 
through your information. Print out 
the desired records in a variety of 
formats: labels, envelopes, or re- 
ports. 

Here's how the mail-merge func- 
tion works: By including the catego- 
ry names from your mailing list be- 
tween brackets in the text of your 
letter (for example, <first> for first 
name), the program automatically 
"(ills in the blanks" with the exact 
information in each personalized let- 
ter. 



But the question lingers: Do you 
need this program? Bank Street 
Mailer is quite good at what it does. 
but it can't substitute for a full- fea- 
tured word processor or more flexi- 
ble data-base software. Both applica- 
tions are already available in Bank 
Street Writer and Bank Street Filer, 
and both swap files back and forth 
easily. However, if you want to pro- 
duce form letters tailored for your 
small business or personal corre- 
spondence. Bank Street Mailer will 
do the job nicely. 

— STEVE MOEiCENSTEiy^' 

WillWriter 

HARDWARE REQUIREMENTS: Apple; C 64/ 

128: IBM PC/PCjr: Macintosh. 
PUBLISHER: Nolo Press 
PRICE: $40 

Like many people, 1 tend to procras- 
tinate when taking care of certain 
serious personal affairs. Drawing up 
a will fits into that category. My hus- 
band and 1 talked about changing 
our wills since they were already 1 
years old (with several items no long- 
er applicable), but did nothing about 
it. 

WillWriter seems to have arrived at 
the right time for us. From Nolo 
Press, a company that specializes in 
legal self-help, this is not software 
you'll use on a steady basis. Once 
your initial will is drawn up, the 
program may be used only for revi- 
sion. However, the total cost will still 
be less than the average attorney's 
fee for will-writing. And even if your 
will involves matters more complicat- 
ed than usual, the program can as- 
sist you. 

While using WillWriter. I expected 
to deal with screens full of legal jar- 
gon. To my relief, I found that the 
instructions and program prompts 
were vwitten in clear English. At one 
point, I decided to change previously 
entered material. Going back was as 
simple as pressing "B." This showed 
me all my entries step by step. When 
I got an important phone call and 
had to quit half-way through the 
program, WillWriter automatically 
saved all of the information I had en- 
tered. And when I returned to the 
program, it restarted where I had 
left off. 

Upon completion, I viewed the full 
document on the monitor. I could 
then make any corrections needed. 
The printout of the will even includ- 
ed a place for a notary public's seal. 

The jargon-free, on-screen lan- 
guage is continued in the manual. 



'JpOtt 



Cooking ; *^«f 

After 

All 

These 

Years. 



Big 8lh Edition 
100,000 copies 
in use worldwide. 



This friendly yellow box continues to 
disappear from thousands of dealer shelves 
every day. There seems to be no end in sight. 

Now in its big Sth Edition, MICRO 
COOKBOOK has been a consistent Best 
Seller for over 2 years. 

When we last looked, over 100,000 copies 
were being used by homemakers cooking for 
their families, singles cooking for themselves, 
and roommates cooking for each other. 

.\nd we're not sure we've counted all the 
caterers, party planners, home economics 
students, even television chefs. 

All people wlio like to eat, and want to 
have fun doing it. 

And now, there's more. We've cooked up 
14 excitingly packaged RECIPE DISKS to help 
you build your collection in a hurn'. Believe us, 
we know what it feels like to be a hungiy 
Cookbook customer. 

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CIRCLE READER SERVICE 39 



WHArS IN STORE 
SOFTWARE REVIEWS 



which covers all legal aspects of the 
generally uniform language of wills. 
(This program is designed for use in 
all states except Louisiana.) You'll 
find information in the manual re- 
garding estate planning, updating 
wills, and understanding legal ter- 
minology. 

Nolo Press offers a 30-day refund 
option if you are not satisfied with 
the product and free update infor- 
mation for a two-year period. Will- 
Writer is an excellent addition to 
anyone's home-productivity library. 

— JUDITH ZORNBEHG 

EDUCATION/FUN 
LEARMING 

The Halley Prefect 

HARDWARE REQUIHEMKNTS: Amiga; Ap- 
ple: Atari; C 64/128. 
PUBLISHER: Mindscape, Inc. 

PRICE: S40-S45 

PUBLISHERS SUGGESTED AGES: 10 + 




If your family can't fly to Bermuda to 
view Halley's comet, here's an alter- 
native you'll love. Combined with a 
pair of binoculars in the backyard, 
The Halley Project can familiarize 
your whole family with our solar sys- 
tem. At the same time, budding star 
pilots will get a chance to show their 
stuff while they navigate vast voids, 
orbit planets, and make spectacular 
landings on barren moons. 

After you listen to a prelimlnan,' 
briefing on a cassette tape, load the 
disk. You are immersed in space on 
the first of 10 missions. The space- 
ship's computer indicates where and 
how far away the sun, planets, and 
Halley's comet lie. "Viewscreens" 
show the consteilations much as 
they appear in our night sky. with- 
out artificial overlays, such as a fish 
for Pisces, to spoil the simulation. 
Navigation is largely visual, so the 
sooner you learn the constellations, 
the better. 

To complete all 10 missions in the 
least possible time, you'll need to 



know information such as which 
planets don't have an atmosphere 
and which moons do. The documen- 
tation suggests several good sources 
for your research. When all the mis- 
sions are accomplished, the program 
generates a code number. Send that 
number to the program's publisher 
for a free, secret eleventh mission! 

The Halley Project reinforces 
learning by encouraging players to 
find facts in books, rather than from 
online data which is spoon fed to 
thern. As a game, The Halley Project 
is an effective teaching model since 
planetary rotation, orbital motion, 
the effects of gravity, and the relative 
sizes of planets are shown accurate- 
ly. Here's another excellent program 
from the designers at Tom Snyder 
Productions. — tan a. summers 

Leaps and Bounds 

HARDWARE REQUIRE.MENTS: Apple; 

Atari: C 64/128: IBM PC/PCjr. 
PUBLISHER: Muse Softwarc 

PRICE: S40 

PUBLISHER'S SUGGESTED AGES: 3-8 

Toddler-friendly software? Why not? 
Leups and Bounds helps youngsters 
learn to match letters with pictures, 
count objects, or have fun with art 
and music. 

Three-year-old Todd liked the 
counting game best. The action 
starts as soon as the game is select- 
ed, with numbers flying into place 
one by one from a corner of the 
screen. Objects, ready for counting, 
then appear. When Todd chose the 
right number, the picture came to 
life with glorious animation. If he 
was stuck for an answer, the pro- 
gram prompted him by moving the 
pointer to the correct number. 




The alphabet game is less interac- 
tive, but is maybe more entertain- 
ing. The offbeat animation amused 
even older family members. A train 
doesn't Just chug down a track, for 
instance: it zooms into the air for a 
takeoff. 



Howard, age 8, preferred art 
and music. He composed tunes by 
pressing keys on the computer or by 
using the joj'stick to tickle the ivo- 
ries of an on-screen piano keyboard. 
Notes appeared on a staff below the 
keyboard. A "tape recorder" in the 
corner of the screen recorded the 
tunc for playback when he was 
done. 

Artwork also gets recorded. How- 
ard was delighted when the program 
played back his Halloween drawing, 
step by step, "including mess-ups." 
This section allows freehand draw- 
ing using colored chalk, and lets you 
add ready-made objects, letters, and 
numbers to the on-scrccn picture. 

At our house, we like software that 
everyone can enjoy, but that's a hard 
bill to fill. Leaps and Bounds is one 
of the few programs simple enough 
for little Todd, yet still entertaining 
for the rest of us. — tan a. summers 

Wally's Word Works: The Parts 
of Speech Game 

IL^RDWARE REQUIREMENTS: Apple; 

Atari; C 64/128. 

PUBLISHER: Sunburst Communica- 
tions 
PRICE: S69 

PUBLISHER'S SUGGESTED ACES; 9-18 

Believe it or not. Wally's Word 
Works makes the parsing of sen- 
tences into an enjoyable game! 




At your direction. Wally the walla- 
by hops around picking up words 
from a sentence displayed on-screen. 
He then drops them in baskets rep- 
resenting the nine basic parts of 
speech: noun, verb, article, preposi- 
tion, etc. Every time you correctly 
identify a word's part of speech, you 
earn points. When you're stumped, 
the answer is eventually shown and 
the word is retired from play. But 
watch out for the "rovers," creatures 
trying to catch Wally when he isn't 
carrying a word. 

A clear and instructive demo 
makes the game easy to start. If 



92 FAMILY COMPUTING 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 56 



parsing an entire sentence is a prob- 
lem, you can replay it up to five 
times. Each S69 package includes 
disks (student, teacher, and back- 
up) designed for a specific reading 
level. Different levels, from grades 
four to 12. can be purchased for $15 
each. 

You can also customize Wally's 
Word Works to suit your kids' needs. 
Add new sentences, reduce the num- 
ber of parts of speech a player must 
identify, or eliminate the rovers to 
make it easier for beginners. 

There are a few drawbacks. Since 
the package was designed primarily 
for school use rather than home, the 
cost is steep. Moreover, the docu- 
mentation was written for parents 
and teachers. Our 13-year-old found 
the manual hard to understand and 
needed a little assistance until he 
got the game's idea. 

Of course, Wally's Word Works 
isn't for everj'body. But it would be 
hard to imagine a better approach 
for practice in identifying parts of 
speech. — tony mokris 

GAMES 

Operation Market Garden 

HARDWARE HEQUIREMENTS: Apple ; 

Atari: C 64. 

PUBLISHER: Strategic Simulations, 

Inc. 

PRICE: S50 

CRITIC'S SUGGESTED AGES: 1 2 + 

Few feats of arms have been as hero- 
ic or as futile as the siege of 35,000 
British paratroopers who held the 
Dutch town of Amhem during Oper- 
ation Market Garden in 1944. There 
the Nazi forces temporarily halted 
the Allied drive to the Rhine. 




Recreate this famous event in de- 
tail with SSI's Operation Market 
Garden. One to two players com- 
mand the actual units that partici- 
pated in the offensive. It's a superb 
game, with many features not found 




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CIRCLE READER SERVICE 25 



JANUARY 1986 93 



WHArS IN STORE 
SOFTWARE REVIEWS 



in other war simulations. These fea- 
tures include choosing paratrooper 
drop zones, plotting artillerj' bar- 
rages, building and destroying 
bridges, determining the size of 
units, and picking supply drops for 
the troops behind enemy lines. 

The Allies must fight their way to 
Arnhem to relieve the relatively small 
force attempting to seize and hold 
the bridges there. At each turn, you 
can feel the weight of command as 
your digital men give their lives to 
carr\' out nearly impossible orders. 

This was one of the games where 
playtestcrs used textbooks, maps, 
and other materials to research the 
simulation's historical background. 
We even watched a videotape of the 
nim version of Operation Market 
Garden. A Bridge Too Far. which 
was a real inspiration for the Allied 
players. Its a first-rate war game for 
intermediate to advanced players, 
age 12 or older. 

Racter 

i-lARDWARE REQUIREMENTS: Apple; IBM 

PC; Macintosh. 
PUBLISHER; Mindscape, Inc. 
PRICE: S45 

CRITIC'S SUGGESTED AGES ; 1 + 

Years ago when I was the film and 
television critic at Omni magazine, 
my editor rushed excitedly into my 
office. He had just witnessed the 
demonstration of a mainframe-com- 
puter artificial-intelligence program 
called Racier. The program, he ex- 
plained, could write prose, poetry, 
and songs, as well as hold interest- 
ing — if strange — conversations. Over 
the intervening years, I have cagerh' 
followed Racfer's progress. 1 am 
pleased to report that there is a 
modified version now available for 
the home market. 

What can you say about a program 
that can talk, show a little common 
sense, and even serve as the ideal 
party guest? This is the first home 
"artificial-insanity" program. Racter 
produces English sentences that are 
structurally sound and grammatical- 
ly correct, but usually quite weird in 
content. 

For example. I asked Racter, "Do 
you think computer programs are 
here to stay?" Its response? "I do 
not. Think computer programs are 
here to stay, that is. Thinking is like 
reckoning. 'Vou must be a soft hu- 
man. I must confess that I'm crazy. 
Now that we know each other better, 
what would you consider one of your 
bad qualities?" 



The fun you can have with Racter 
is limited only by your sense of hu- 
mor and inventiveness since it is ca- 
pable of having open-ended conver- 
sations without difficulty. It will also 
write stories, recall "experiences," 
and remember "acquaintances" 
with world figures throughout 
history. 

Although Racter is the hottest ar- 
tificial-intelligence program around, 
it won't be the last. For just as Pong 
began the arcade craze in the early 
"70s. we can expect Racter to be one 
of the "granddaddys" of many more 
such programs in the future. For 
age 10 and up (younger with adult 
super\'ision). 

Super Bowl Sunday 

HARDWARE REQUIREMENTS: C 64. 

PUBLISHER: Avalon Hill 

PRICE: S35 

CRITIC'S SUGGESTED AGES: 12-1- 

Th' the first full-scale, animated, 
sp' ^ rategy game we've tried. Su- 
per t^.ujf Sunday is an excellent 
football simulation that relies on the 
true-life abilities of teams and play- 
ers -for realistic action in an exciting 
play system. 



wiiiiHiiiaiiSia 




Until now, sports-statistics games 
have been intellectually stimulating 
but visually drab or limited. But in 
Super Bowl Sunday, one to two 
gamers coach one or two (out of 20) 
past Super Bowl teams. You formu- 
late tactics and choose plays, then 
decide who will execute them and 
watch fully animated teams carry 
them out. 

Each down involves a number of 
decisions chosen from a menu-driv- 
en system. Both offense and defense 
can pick their formations. Then the 
offense runs, passes, or kicks. You 
can designate who will be your cjuar- 
terback. receiver, or runner by re- 
ferring to stats on proven player 
abilities. The defense then sets up: 
again, based on real performance 



records. The computer completes 
each play with beautifully animated 
ll-athlete teams running on a full- 
screen picture. Here's one of the best 
sports simulations to date for age 12 
and up. 

Winter Games 

IWRDWARE REQUIREMENTS: Apple; 

C 64/128; Macintosh. 
PUBLISHER: Epyx Software 

PRICE: S27-S39 

CRITIC'S SUGGESTED ,^GES: 10 + 




The third in Epyx's Olympic sports/ 
arcade series. Winter Games is as 
well-produced as the two summer 
versions. Up to eight players have 
unlimited practice sessions for the 
sometimes difficult skills required. 
Then you can choose which country 
you represent in the Games. 

You elect to participate in one to 
seven events: figure skating, free- 
style skating, speed skating, the 
biathalon (cross-country skiing in- 
terspersed with target shooting), 
hot-dog aerial ski jumps, traditional 
ski jumps, and a fast bobsled run. 

Each event calls on gamers to use 
different, coordinated joystick move- 
ments. In the figure-skating event, 
for instance, you "choreograph" a 
lithe young skater to move through 
the program's musical accompani- 
ment. You put her through the 
paces, executing seven required 
moves in three minutes to the 
SI rains of a classical tune. This is 
the first time we've seen such grace- 
ful movements in a game program. 
The feeling of pride I felt after ac- 
complishing the rigorous leaps and 
spins was one of the high points in 
my gaming experiences. 

This superb game has beautifully 
detailed, lifelike graphics and a 
knockout play system. Winter 
Carries' lengthy musical score is ab- 
solutely state of the art in creative 
uses of music for gaming. Suitable 
for age 10 and over. 

— REVIEWS BY JAMES DELSON 



94 FAMILY COMPUTING 




ACCI53 



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JANUARY I9S6 95 



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Manwlacturar •{ Laalhar Ooodi 

K. t. Universal Go.TILi (313) Ml-IVSt 

193 *. •■■■•(a dr. Anahsim, CA. 938^5 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 28 




FLIPPY D SKETTES 






Willi i^iH "iigs. wtitt" lifi'ti^i I Uhf? ^T'lK Irpp fli.^l- 
f>ii^ i'r-n.»>lopi?s iis^f ID lahcls In F.ltlory Rf-iinrl 
Pfiy P.Hrhs 

Odut'ii- nnii di'f] Flippv ^riows ii'i-i' ol hoiti s-de^ ni 
i1'Pl>i-Tfe> Dy Mliqli' hit,i(1cd drives 

ADD ON SPECiAl n.skptfe Mi* mtlh lock> fn. i()!i 
!i .t^-;ki»tu^>s iiijii S9 95 plus f^on stiipnuiq .inn 
".ip»=)iirwi 

MiriiruMtn ijiinnlHv 50disKrtles Oiscoiinl foi 300iif 
moio dishciU'S Shipping anct Hflrtdling; S-1 00 v--r 
iCXldiskrtlos Rortitcedshippifigchi^ig'r'foi lugprgnan- 
lities COD .-trtdSJOO Cash ot crrtifn-achf^rk Ml 
rpsiflpnis .idd -!"• --nlcs inx PiiCt^^Siuricr- T;jch,inai' 
Ai!bOLJl llln■^rlr-^ 



COD 

Precision Daiu Produi-t^i 

(ftiM j5:-.i45- ■ M[vhi^.(Ti i-8i.xi6.i:-:Jts 



t 



J 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 40 



ADAM 



PRINTER INTERFACE 

• COLOR GRAPHICS PRINTING • 

• Prml HCiR 0( HGR2 screens • 8 diHerom COiOiS • PrMuce pn:iuf«r5 
wilh commetcia! soHwarG or your own programs • Ariwork, r|in|:)h&. 
signs, bfli cfiarts, atiylhing yDu can creaie' 

• FAST PRINTING • 

• SmarrDasc ' or Smariwriier ~ til^s » Mosi doi rTiainx pfintefs are 
much !d£i6i ifian ADAM'£ loughly 10 cnaracters per second 

• QUIET PRINTING • 

• Dot malrm purlers generafly qunfflflr Ihan ADAM prtnlei • Theimal 
pf inlers generally much quieter 

• WAtKAWAY PRINTING • 

• Pin )n hole paper feeds buili \n xa mosi printers will rekab^y advance 
loldfid compulei paper ■ No more Qaby^ittirig the pnriei' 

• BLACK AND WHITE GRAPHICS PRJNTING • 

• Similar to color pnrtJJrTig. But works with Commodofc-^ ccmpaitile 



Th« C-mtetlace ts a stDgiB circuit board irui Iiia entirely Aith<n ADAM 
tti Expansion «^l Q(i6 It ulds a CofnmoiJoie BA »ral bus to ADAM' 
A Single hoio drilled m ADAM^ re'tnovaQie cover is ihc only jnodfl ca 
lion needed And il comes with a one year pans and laboi wafianiy 
SoMware on dMA pack is mciud^id for color g^ap^ic screen dumps To 
ihe Okimate 10 Pnr^ier, lor black and while screen dumps on Commo* 
dore 64 compahble printers (Okimaie to. Okidata 1:20. ComreH 
CR22Q, andolhersl. artdforTe»toulpuilon Commodore 64 ccnpaible 
printprs and most printers wifi a Ceni'Ofucs interface Cenuonics 
inie'tac? pttnters lequn-e the oiplK>r\ai C^niroriKis port^ the few speoal 
lealurps Li^ed rn SmarTwritei' {su&s£rip1. SupersCnpl. urdeHinei ait 
sen! out !hi.s port as Eoscn punier ccuJe? 

C-INTEHFACE AND OKIMATE 10 PRINTER 

• Thermal Iransler al >60 CM^rActeis per seCOrtd ■ Coior or B&W 
graphics ♦ Includes paper, colOr iibbOn, blaCk ribbon, ar^d punier 
cable • Pin in hole paper (eetJ • S269 95 ■ S6 00 Sfipg&hrdlg 

• CINTERFACE AND OKIDATA 12D PRINTER 

• Dot rrtaiiu a; 120 cbaracters per second • Pin m hole paper teed 

• BiW igraptics • Includes nbbon arxJ cable • $299 95 ■ Sfi 00 
sbp94hf*dig 

• C-INTERFACE AND COMREX CB220 PRINTER 

• Doi matrn g.1 M Characters per second ■ Pin m bole paper iced ■ 
B&W graphics • Includes nbbon and cable • Maior manutactuior • 
S17J 95 - Sa 00 shpg&hrdtg 

• C-INTERFACE AND CENTRONICS PORT 

• Adds, standard Cenlrnnics poM to C-intertace • Ircludes both ca- 
bleM Inside jmall ftoi ber^een The two cables • $119 95 - S^ 00 
ShpgAhnfllg 

■ CINTERFACE ONLY 

• S69 95 ■ £3 50 snippirkg and nandling 

MO residenis add 5.725*^o tax, 

Sentj money orcler (lor (aster 
service) or check to: 

CAPITAL SOFTWARE 

RO BOX 370 

ST LOUIS, MO 63032 

TM-ADAM, Smartbasic, Smartwrder, Trademark Coleco 
lnduslr^es. 'nc- Commodore. Cammodore 64 Trademark 
Commodore Eleclronics. Lid. 



NOW USE BOTH SIDES 

OF YOUR DISKETTE! 

5^ DISKETTE 

HOLE 

PUNCH 

WITH HOLE GUIDE 




and EDGE GUIDE 



PUNCH OUT IS ALWAYS IN THE RIGHT POSITION 

Available for IMMEDIATE Shipment 

Onty $10.00 add >2.00 shipping 

CHECK OR MONEY ORDER 
I DEALER INQUIRIES INVITED | 

FOR OTHES THAKAPPIE AND *PPIE LOOK-»-tlKES- 
WE mi k TEMPLkTf TO POSITION k REGUttR 
liOUND HOLE PUNCH FOR THE READ ENtBLE HOLE 
Kht THE CENTER 

COST— 4- for S200 
•;N,P.S. Inc. (^ 

■■ D«p). C C. |31S)»H.*010 

^ ll38B0»W0OtlBI) JinmmpWH PA 19046 —i'.Z.^ 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 37 



maxell disks 

LIFETIME WARRANTY 



TIRED OF WAITING 
FOR SERVICE AND PRICE? 

9 out ol 10 SURVEYED 
DISK BUYERS PREFERRED 

NORTH HILLS 

#1 IN SERVICE AND PRICE 

1-800-328-3472 

Formatted and hard sectored disks 
in stock-Dealer inquiries invited, 

COD, VISA, MASTERCARD 
All orders shipped within 24 hrs. 



AA4 



m 



NORTH HILLS CORP. 
INTERNATIONAL 

3564 Rolling View Dr. 
White Bear Late, MN. 55110 

MN. call colled— 612-770-0485 



ADAM 



DIGrTAL DATA DRIVE 

$29.d5 

RS-232/CENTRONICS PORT 

$164.95 
ASK ABOUT OUR CLUB! 

We Carry ALL Software! 



AOAMNet 

DRAWER 510 

UNIONTOWN, ARK 72955 



FREE CATALOG! 

Features Precision Tools and 
Equipment for Computers 



I » 



'•\ 



-^---Q = 






CIRCLE READER SERVICE 8 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 2 



Jensen's new catalog features tiard-to-find pre- 
cision tools, tool lilts, tool cases, lesl equipment 
and computer accessories used by sophisti- 
cated tiobbyjsts. scientists, engineers, laborato- 
ries and Qovemment agencies. Call or write for 
your free copy today. 

JENSeNTOOLS INC. 

Dept. FC 7815 S. 46th Street 
Phoenix, Arizona 85044-5399 (602) 968-6231 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 27 



96 FAMllA'COrilPUTlNG 



ALMOST-FREE-SOFTWARE 

FOK VtC 20 UtD COMMODORE H 



We have the very b«bt pulsllc 
domain saftHare avaI labia 
*nvwhBr». Al 1 program* hav* 
have bsen dB-buaaad or 
anhancBd with datallad action 
complatB Instructlont, -full 
color, and sound whara 
applicablE. Error free, 
complHtaly guarantaad. 
6 AMES, EDUCATION, BUSINESS, 
MUSIC, UTILITIES, and HOME. 
Programs for all agat and 
appllcatlonB, Hundrada of 
selections awailabla for 
Commodora Vic-20, C-64, and 
the new C-12B. Tan aalsctlons 
for •25.00. 

To order: sand self addraBaed 
stamped envelope -for list of 
proQramt and deacriptlona to: 

ALH0ST-FREE-90FTWARE 

BOX 37 

BATH, N.H. 03740 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 3 



Home is 

where the computer is. 

Reach your target market 

directly. Advertise in 

DIRECT ACCESS. 

To Place Your Ad in 

DIRECT ACCESS 
Call (212) 505-3636 
FAMILY COMPUTING 

730 Broadway 
New York, N.Y. 10003 




Create Speech ! 

With your PC or Compatible 
Announcing... The PEH-1 Speech CREATOR 




• i'^ucational - Help learn languages 

• Fun - Create any word the way you want it 

• l^asy to u,se - Mensi-di'iven software 

• Attaches to any projTram 

• EKternsJ Speecli Unit - No slots needed 
Requires 68K and MS Dos 2.0 or Higher 

Order now for the Holidays! Viva, ?ljistercflrd accepted 
ION 



oti\>. 



Ay 



»iji 



„jj , Morristown Airport ^^^^J 

•'• ' • Morristown. NJ07960 "1 3!1 ! 



Morristown, NJ 07960 



Phone orders- 1201) 267-6800 (201) 326-9S96 
Money Back Guarantee 1 jeai' limttod wm-rnnty 
Catalog wiUiSASE 

CIRCLE READER SERVICE 26 



COMPUTER DESK 




* Organize your 
computer system 
with this high 
quality, versatile 
desk. Write or 
call for a free 
catolog. Dealer 
inquires invited. 



List- $125 

SALE - $89 

(freight included) 



SUNHILL 

414 Olive Way Suite 210 

Times Square Building 

Seattle. WA 98101 

(206) 622-5775 



CIRCLE READER SERVICE 52 



COMMODORE G4 



1985 TAX 
RETURN HELPER 



Fast and easy income tax preparation 

■ This IS the 5ih annual ednion - thausanas ot repeat cusicxners 

• IncSudes Form 1040. Schetiules A. B. C, D E, G. SE. W. 
Forms 2106, 2441 and ^562 

• Enter and modily data on a screen copy of ihe Itjrm 

• Works likg a spreadsheet all the lines allocied Dy a cinange 
are irslantly updated 

• Ajiomaiic lax computalion 

• Data can be saveO on disk and updated. 

• Arso included > ■■„ t ■-■ - 

A Oata base program lo create and maintain lilsi^ot laK relalad 
iierns (medical, car ©npei^ses. etc j thai can t^e kjsed d-reei- 
ly by Itie tan programs 

• Can be used an year rouno Also good for many oiher ac- 
courtirg |Qbs (checkbook balancing, elc ) 

Price IS la> detlucOWe. C64 disk: sa3 (+ S1.50 SiH) 
PROFESSIONAL VERSION - alSD prints dala on (RS (orms: 
$45 (* SI.SOSiH} 

Previous customers prices S22 and S30 for pro-version 
(. SI BOEiHl 

KSOFT CO. 

845 W6LLNER RD 

NAPEHVILLE, lU 60540 

1312) 961-1250 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED OR MONEY BACK 



MAIL 

ORDER 

MADE 

SAFE 

Ordering merchandisf by mail can be a conve- 
nient way to save lime. enerf5i-. and even mon- 
ey. It Is liie bfsl way to buy products tliat can- 
not be found locally. We encourage mall-order 
buyiiii;. We suf^est that you read Lhc following 
lo ensure (hat yon have a successful experi- 
ence. 



BEFORi YOU BUY: 

• Call the company. If possible. Check years in 
business. Ask for references. Are they listed In 
the phone book? Ask for a contact name lo tise 
In future dealliijjs. 

• Head the prodtict description. Make sure the 
product offered is what you want. If possible. 
Investigate the sellers claim. Find out if the 
prodiiri will do what lhc ad says. Is consum- 
er support offered if you have trouble getting 
the product to fiincuoii properly? 

• Mote the promised delivery or shipment 
time. The seller iimsl ship your order when 
promised. If no specilic lime is promised, the 
seller must ship no later than 30 days after 
receiving your order. 

• Find out the merchant's return policy. Does 
lhc compaity offer guarantees? If Its a tttird- 
pariv product, is the manufacturer's warrantee 
valid? 

PLACE THE ORDERi 

• Send complele order Information as In- 
structed. Incomplete Information may delay 
your order. The 30-day period does not begin 
until the seller receives a properly completed 
form. 

• Keep a copy of your order and the original 
advertisement, 

• Make a note of Iht merchant's name, ad- 
dress, and the dale of your order. (If you place 
your order by telephone, note time and date of 
your conversation and the name of the person 
wilh ii'hom yoii speak. 1 

• Keep a record of your payment la canceled 
check or charge-card statementl. 

IF YOU HAVE A PROBLEM: 

• Contact the company. If contact is made by 
phone, keep a record of the time and date of 
call and lhc name of person with whom you 
speak. Folfou'-u;) it! wriitng. describing Ihe 
problem. Include copies of the order and yotir 
payment records; outline any solution reached 
during any previous phone calls. 

IF YOU CANNOT RESOLVE YOUR 
PROBLEM, YOU CAN: 

• Call your local or slate consumer-protection 
office, 

• Call the local or state consumer-protection 
office located nearest the company. 

• Call your local Postmaster. Ask for the name 
and address of the appropriate postal Inspec- 
lor-ln-Chargc. This Is a federal authority who 
may be able lo resolve such disputes. 

• If merchandise was paid for by credit card, 
contact credit-card company providing full In- 
formaUon about your problem. Your credit-card 
company may be able lo resolve your com- 
plaint. 

• Contact the book, magazine, or newspaper 
publisher that carried, or Is currently carrj'ing, 
the advertisement. Publishers can be helpful In 
resolving complalnts. 

FOK MORE INFOIttlATION ON "SHOPPING BY 

MAIL.'" WRITE THE FEDEI«AL TRADE COM- 
MISSION. Pennsylvania Ave. and Sl.NSh St. 
N.W.. Washington. D.C. 20580 



JANUARY 1986 97 



Give Tsur Pr«<lvct or Sarvlce a 

Beeit with Cla»lfi«d 

■xpaiart.' 

Cosl-crfccdvEly reach llii' more than 
I million FAMILY coMPirriNG 
r<;adcrs who want InformatJon on 
computing and computer-related 
products. 

Active, aware users of: Apples. Atarls. 
Colccos. Commodores. Franklins. 
lUMs. TIs. TImex Slnclalrs. TRSs. 
elc, who have an ongoing Interest In 
system upgrade, adding peripherals, 
writing programs, acquiring soft- 
ware. Joining data bases, bulletin 
boarding, and accessing you. 
Connect now by placing a classified 
ad for your product or service In 

FAMILY COMFUTINO, 

cATioeiuiSi 

•ANNOU-\CEMEN'TS 

BOOKS^IANUALS 

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 

COMPUTER REPAIR 

FOR FREE^O SWAP 

HARDWARE 

MISCELLANEOUS 

NOVELTIES 

SNfALL BUSINESSES 

SOFTWARE 

TELECOMPUTING 

USED COMPUTERS/SOFTWARE 

USERS' GROUPS 
RATES) 

Cost per line per Issue: 

In 1 Issuer 81B.95 

In 3 consecutive Issues: S15.95 

In 6 consecutive Issues: S14.50 

In 12 consecutive Issues: 813.60 

34 characters per line. Including 

spaces and punctuation 

25 characters per line. Including 

spaces and punctuation. In all caps 

or boldface 

SIS addillonal for allany boldface 

or Italic lettering 

25% additional for toned back- 
ground 
•Announcements: 1 line minimum. 

S13.60 per line 
TO PLACI TOUR ABt 

• Print or t>pe your copy 

• Determine number of lines 

• Decide frequency 

• Send ad with check or M.O. to 

FAMILY COMPLTINC 

730 Broadway 

New York. NY 10003 

Attn: Classified 
Or call us at 12121 505-3587 and we 
will help you write an ad with real 
FA.MILY pulling power. 
All P.O. Bo.wMall Order Insertions 
must submit PHONE NUMBER for 
our records. 

Ads received by the 20th of the 
month will appear In the Issue ap- 
pro.\lmately two months following re- 
ceipt of the ad, 

AMWOUMCEMEMTS~ 

CMl thiujks & welcomes it.s new members 
Jon Snider. [Ronald Slsemorc, Roland 

Burn ham. Doug Glenn. Stevan 

Nolmberg. H.G. Ferguson. Harry Brown 

Dan Summey. Man- St]Uirc, Steven 

McRcynolds. Mr. Billy Greene. Sr. 

International Pansophlc Friends 
BASE Rl. 1 Bx. 72RA. Uplon. hT 42764 

Let over 400.000 fanillles see vour 

ANNOUNCEMENT In this section of 

FAMILY COMPUTIHG classllied! 

Call (212) 505-3587 now!!! 

POOKS/MAMUAIS 

The Hackers Guide to A[>AM. S17.95 

PPD with DDP or disk. P. HInkJc, 
117 Norlhview Rd.. hliaca. NT 14850 

EXPANDABLE COMPUTER NEWS 

Isl ADAM-only publication. 812.00/ 

6 issues. Sage Enterprises. r<t, 2, 

Box 211. Russellville. .MO 65074 



CLASSIFIED 



'A'ADAM.RESOURCE.DIRiCTORT'*' 

175 - pgsl 813.95 or SASE for info. 
P.O. Bq.s 90, SeeliviUe. IN 47878 



COMPLTEKWORD PROCESSOR OPEUVTORS, 
INFORM.ATP.'E BOOKLET ON COMPLTER 
BASICS IN A DOUXTO-E.WTH LANGUAGE. 
S.-MISFACTION GUARWTEED. SEND S3 TO 
L&T SERVICES. 3125 N. GOLDEN AVE. 
P.O. BOX 3542. S.'iN BERNARDINO. CA 

92413-3542. 

WORDSTAR* MAILMERGE inslmcliiinal 
Refcrencr Manual IN A NUTSHELL, 
Fast, easy w/special tricks'shorlcuts. 
SB. CAPES. rjo.\ 9052. Scoltsclale. A7. 65252 

BUSINESS 
OPPORTUNITIES 

Program "I'our Computer To Pay Off!! 

Free Information: AbuncUmi Life. 

Box 278- IE. Sugarland. TX 77487 

flOO.IMO OR MORE 

FROM TOUR COMPUTER I I 

Details SI. PAC WEST NfARKETING. 

I5S6 Halford .-^ve.. Suite 255, 
Santa Clara. CA 95051 

S 10-3360 WEEKLY AND UP 
MAILING CIRCULARS! NO Quotas 
Sincerely Interested, rush stamped 
envelope to: NATIONAL DfVISION. 
Box 20728-FCOl. San Diego. CA 92120 

CONSUMER COOPS 

IS IT TRUE YOU CAN BUY JEEPS FOR 

S44 THROUGH THE U.S. GOVEFffiMENT? 

GET THE FACTS TODAY! 

CALL 13121 742-1142 EXT. 4685 

FOR FREE/TO SWAP 

FREE T1-99(4A SOFTWARE 

Write for details: .Mpha Company, 

162 Chajx-I Dr.. Chtirchvlllc. PA 18966 

• ATTENTION RS COCO OWNERS • 

FREE 24-page CoCo catalog!!! 
CQCoNuls.nox2I272.Woodhaven.N^' 11421 

Catalog TI-99. Commodore. IBM. Specify 

hardware, software, accessories. 
Compcilllon Computer. 2629 W. National. 
Milwaukee. WI 53204. (8001 662-9253 



HARDWARE 



We sell Atari 2600 carlridges. 

Wide selection, free price llsi. 

VILLA VIDEO. Box. 17131, MIlw, Wi 53217 



Discount Hard'Soft«'arc T1-99/4A 

Sundisk Software. Bx. 1690, Warren. MI 

48090 TIBBS: 13131 751-11 til 



AOAM Discottnl hardware & software. 

Send stamped, addressed envelope 

fur FREE nser. DATA BACKUP 

Box 335. lona. ID 83427 



AppleWorks 6199! Kavpro. Panasonic 
Sr. Partner. Imagewriler w/I!e or 
Ik- kit. S489, OCA. 445 N. Pine, 

Ri-i'(l,sl)iug. VJ] 53959; [60H1 524-2429 



SUPER DISCOUNT CATALOG 

Hardware, software, accessories. &. 

mucti more! Send S I to Universal Compuier. 

Box 26623. Indianapolis. IN 46226 



DKCOUMT HAHDWABE & SOFTWARE 

Apple. Commodore. Tl-99. Atari. IBM PC 
30% below retail, Tl exl..BASlC-S55. 
Gemini SO 1 0-S2 1 9. Panasonic 1 09 1 -S245. 
Prlnler interface: Tl-$55, Alarl-$45. 
Indus disk drive: Atari-S209: C 64-S229. 
Add 3% sli. 0\-er 1.000 software titles. 
Send SI for cat. Specify computer. 
MULTI VIDEO SERVICES, Box 246. 
E. Amherst. NY 14051: 17161 688-0469 

ADAM compatible 64 K memoiy 

expansion card S49.95. US 

UNIVERSAL INTERFACE SYSTEMS. 

Suite 133-20465 Douglas Cr.. 
Langley. British Columbia V3A 4B6 



ATTENTION ADAM OWNERS! We sell HW/SW 
at untseaiable prices. No^' in stock: 
modems and disk driira. Cat. 25C VisaWC 
THE ;\DA.\I t>KPOT. 419 Rldgway Ave.. 
Johnsonburg. PA 15845: 18141 965-24S7 



MISCELLANEOUS 



TS2068 Floppy Disk Interface and 
CPM and more. Acrco. Box 18093. 
Auslin. TX 7S760: (5121-451-5874 



"DiSKETTlSI" 

St/DD DISKS. S8.50,' 10 pack. 

BS/DD DISKS. S9.50.10 pack. 

Add S2 shipping & handling. 

Backed 100% by J/D LIMITED, 

P.O. Box 223. Skokle. IL 60076; 
1312) 677-2525 . . . CHK/MO/VISA/WC 



DUST COVERS 
Oust cover* sf loft'llneil vinyl. 

Speclfv color choice; Blk'Brw/Belge/ 
TaaWiile. ADAM 3-plccc set. 816. 
AOAM disk. 86. Atari eOOXL'eOOXU 
1050 disk drive. 87.50. Apple Hel 
Tiy99-4A recorder or printer. S7.50. 
IBM PC 2-piccc set. S14. IBM PCfr 

2-plecc set, 812.50. We also earn' 
covers for C 64, Epson, & many more! 

We make custom covers to Til your 

needs. Add 82s/h: SASE for more Info. 

J CHECK SOrrWARE. Box 345. MlUlv. 

AL 36558: (308) M6-a3tO VISAMC 

Printer ribbons for anv prlnler 

DELTA MICROHICS 

Box 10933, Erie, PA 16514 

18141 455-5667. 9-3 p.m, EST 

AML hoi fhe SUPPLIES for yeul 

Are you spending too much for 

diskettes, ribbons, and paper? 

* WE WILL BEAT AMY PRICE * 

on KODAK. DYSAN. .\fAXELL. SCOTCH 

VERBATIM. & LIBERTY DISKS 

C 64 Software " C.O.D.s Welcomed. 

Win a MILLION. MTS LOTTO 815,00 
AML 71-38 Mvrtle Ave.. Queens. NT 
1 1385 17181 326-1 1 10 MCI#1 13-5312 

* CALL COLLECT OR WRITl TOBATI * 

ADAM OWNERS! Turn CASSETTE to DATA 

PACKS. DackupCopy Prgms^Gamcs/Book 

DDP; S19.S5; Book: 815.95: R. Domlnguci: 

613 l.;iSalIe Avenue. SFRAfJ. CA 94124 

COLOR PRINTER RIBBONS 
Brown, Blue, Red, Green, Purple 

APPLE (dot mairixl - COLECO lADAMI 
COMMODOr-lE (40221. IBM (graphics) 
-EPSON lMX70/e0l. (MX80L (FXeOI, 
(RX80I. ONLY 88,50 EACH MINIMUM 
ORDER 2 Kl IIHO.MS OF ANY COLOR. SEND 
CHECK OR MOiNEY ORDER, plus 82 ,(» vh 

PRINCETON ornec supply 

43-15 QUAIL RIDGE DR1\'E. 

PljMNSnORO, NJ 08536 

HELP your LOGO Deliver: 

•AUTOMOVE ... for the \cr>- young. 

•SiiAPES ... for impalleni arllsts. 

•ALPHABET ... for Idler lovers. 

LOOOmotlve 

Disk and Manual . . . 818.00 

Classroom Kit . . . 854.00 

REgUlRES: Apple Logo and 64K 

SPEClPi'; for Logo or Logo II 

WRITE; Hilton Abbott 

87 Maplewood Terrace 

Springfield. MA 01108 

SOFTWARE 

Fiv cor problems w/IBM-PC 

Don't pay a tnechanlc unnccessar\- S. 
T^«<il)leiboe#er^4ne'Miser Mechanic 

a uscr-fricndly answer to car problems. 
Fault tracing by symptom, system; 
repair and maintenance instructions. 
Act now pay only 829.95. 30-day 
money back guarantee. Send checks 
to: ExpeHAWare, inc.. Suite 2LN, 
16 W. 161h St.. New York, NY 1001 1 



ADAM MIDIA MAHACER5 

BACKUP<t'.S37D840TCepyesrt-i-$I5 
SASE for Info; MMSO P.O. Box 1112. 
Broomfield. CO 80020-81 12. 

EDUCATIONAL SOFTWARE 

158-p. catalog, color screen pictures 

narrative age/grade levels. 66 
publishers from .Addison to Xerox. 
900 -t- programs for Apple. Atari. 
COM. IBM. Send 82 Vlsa'MC/MO' 

personal check to: Interstate 
Software. P.O. Box 8952. Boise. ID 

83707: 12081 342-3347. 

ATARI eOO/XL/XE Iniegrated modular 

database. Vet^' simple, licxible, fast. 
8000 + recoi'ds'disk. Auto account set- 
up, mall, directory. User formats for 

spreadsheet forms, statements. 

S19.9S. Demo disk. 83- 100+ optional 

business modules. Chapter length 

word processor. S 1 0. MlcorMlser. 

1635-A. Holden Ave. Oi-Iando FL 32809 

LOTTO PLAYERS BE A WINNER 

Lei yoLir PC ]jlck your own #'s for 

Lotto, Plav Fovir. Daily #'s. Will run 

on all PCs. Send 85: P&L Products, 

3-1/2 STARK TOR, DAKBURY CT 06810 

Bm'*n on credit? Know your paj-ments 

before buying, Apple ll-,c,e on 
disk. 87.95. Send to Nevets Notions. 
S462-F DennI St.. Cypress. CA 90630 

CP/M SoHware for ADAM. 

SCNCHOP slojis sideways scroll. 815. 

Plus 82 s&h. CP/M pti'blic-domain 

catalog lists 375 disks, S7.50. P/P, 
Elllnm Aitectatei, 24000 Bessemer 

St.. #F. Woodland Hills. CA 91367. 
818-348-4278 NIC & Visa 

85 Software! The best C-64 Public 
Domain Software. Write or call today 
for free brochuR'. or send 812 + 83.50 
s&h for 2 dlsks.'5 tarter kit & 44-pagc 
book. CA tics, add 6.5 tax. Visa/MC. 
64 Gold. 3219 Folsom. SF. CA94110i 

14151 550-8222 or (8001 431-6249 

FUN CHILDREN'S SOFTWARE 

Over 120 low-cc:sl programs for kids. 
TI-99/4A and C 64. Free brochure. 
KIDware 

Box 9762. Dept. F, Moscow. ID 83843 

You read about 

KITCHEN PLANNER 

in Nov. 84 FAMILY COMPUTING 

Cover Story 
Now. YOU loo can save 5-6 hrs a 
month bv creating vour 1 to 14 dav 
BALANCED MENU and SHOPPING LIST In 
less than 5 minutes! Easy to use- 
Compact, store-sized printout. 
Send 829.95 + 81.50 handling. In CA 
add 6.5%. All Apple lis. Sav-Soft 
Products. POn 24898, San Jose, CA 
93154, VlSA/MC call: (408) 978-1048 



Adam Owners — Now your Adam can read 

& convert other CP/M disk formats. 

Contact: Sage Enterprises, Rte.2, 

Box 211. Russellville. MO 65074 

T1«99/«A Software/If ardwnre bargains, 
Hard-to-tind Items. Huge telectten. 
Fast ser^'icc. Free catalog. DYNENT 
Box 690. Hicksville. -NY 11601 

IBM PC &Jr Sollware. Free list! 
Paradise Compuier Works. R,D, 1, 
Box 273A, Newark Valley, N"Y 13811 



COPY CIXIN'E XL for C 64, Duplicate pro- 
tected disks, 90% elfecllvc. -30 utilltv. 
824.95 -^S2 sli EDUCOMP. 2139 Nni'castlc 
Ave.. Cardiff. CA 92(X)7; (619) 942-383B 
C 64 and IBM-PC SOFTWARE CHEAP!!! 

Send for your catalog of game, 
home management, business, uiilily. 
and educational software available, 
and you will also receive a disk- 
utility program lisling free, along 
with details on how to make money 
at home with your personal computer, 
PACEWARE. INC. Box 64-A. 
Pompano Beach. FL 33074 



98 FAMILY COMPUTING 



ADAM SOFTWARI 

VIDEOTUNES— Compose and play music 

AUTOAID— improves basic 
FORTH'langLiage Interprcltr/complk-r 

FUTUUEVISION. P-O- Box 34-FC. 

N. Blllcrlca. .VIA 01862. VIsa'MC 
6 1 7-663-859 1 FREE APAM CATALOG 



TI-99/4A Word Processor & Prlnl Pgm. 
Mail Usi— BC SOnWARE WRITIRS Box 

335651, N'onhslcnii. CO B0233 (E.Brcq.l 
CK/MO'MC'Vlsa. 13031 -428-7127 



ADAM SOFTWARE. New for busuifss: 
(Ace Is. payable/Accts. reed. /Payroll. 1 
Also complex home finance, recipe, 
educ. games. SASE for catalog. STE\'E 
JACOm, Bas 11205. Clearivaler. FT. 33516 
Commodore 64 ' Tlmexj'Slnclair 
Free caialog — specify computer. 
WMJ DATA SYSTEMS. 4 Butterfly 
Drive. Hauppauge. NY 1 1788 



LTiCLE ERMES TOOLKIT will BACK UP 
vour .^DAM software on disk or tape, 
SCAM, DUMP & MODIFY. 30-pa)4e 
Users Manual. $23 disk/S25dp -^S2syii. 
[tifo: SASE to UiMie Ernte'i Toolkit, 
P.O. Box 6382. Akron. OH 44312 



FREE APPLE SOFTWARE 

Over 1 .000 public-domain progran:is on 
50 diskettes. 85 each, plus SI 
shipping per order. Send SI for 
catalog, refundable with order. 

C & H ENTERPRISES 
Box 29243. Memphis. TN 38127 



FREE C 64 SOFTWARE CATALOG 

PANTHER SOFTWARE, 6608-4 
Wisleria Dr.. Charlotte, NC 28210 



ADAM SOFTWARE. MULTItART BACKUP 

5 carls lo disk. 8 to DP. SI 0.95. 
BASIC MAHAOIlt— loads fast, reads, 
dlr. to display programs neally on 
screen. Arrows to select pgm.S-keys 
for utilities. Pgm to conv. Basic 
pgms to load/run fast. + more. S29.95. 
Ck/MO for DP'dlsk. no s/h within US 
SASE/lnfo to: PRACTICAL PROGRAMS 
P.O. Box 244, Kalamazoo. MI 4900.5 



ADAM owners: Unleash the POWER 1 1 
In fo & CIFTI SASE lo: DATA DOCTOR, 

P,0. Box 776. Oak Hill WVa 2590! 



Bratid Name Software-Great Savlnt^s! 
Catalog SI: refund w.'first order. 
FALCO SYSTEMS. Box 371. 
WAPPINGERS. NT 12590 



APPLE II SERIES (DOS 3.3) Educa- 

llonal sw: SPELLER ZADE spelling 
games. S24.95: ARmUMETIC practice 
+ . - . X . ^ , whole or decimal. S19.95: 
EQUATIONS practice eqtiatlons. 
SI 7.95: and CRAPHICS TIPS DISK 
guided tour. S24.95, Sh. chge. S2. 
NC res.— ia.\ iV2%: MC & Visa. 
FREE BROCHURE— LOCUS STSTIMS, 
Rt. 5. Box 250. N. Wllkesboro. NC 28659 



ATTENTION OWNERS 

Commodorc-64-plu5-4- 1 28 (Speelfy 
Computer) Now on Disk-Your mvn store 
display-Shows 10 Different Specials- 
Correct time — Name of your store- 
All in a neon lighting effect-Runs 

24 lirs. a day-Specials can be 

changed at ativ time. Price S75.00 

Order: SPECK PROGRAMS. PO Box 69. 

Pine CItv. MN 55063 



FREE 

WORD PROCESSING 

TBAIHIHC GUIDE 

Become an expert in advanced word 

proce-sslng techniques in just a fexv 

hours. Develop skills thai can be 

applied lo any of the best -selling 

word processors. Includes program 

disk so you Icam quickly by doing. 

The training guide and program disk 

la 850.00 vaJuej will be sent to 

you absolutely free, with no obll- 

gaiton. Available for IBM & TRS-SO. 

specify type of computer. Call 

13051 259-9397. or write; LeScript 

Processing Systems. P.O. Box 361 136, 

Melbourne, FL 32936 



T1-99'4A Softwarc/Bcsl selections. 
"Free catalog" MICRO-BIZ HAWAII 
P.O. Box 1 i08. Pearl City. HI 96782 

MATH MAGIC NEA Teacher Certified. 
K-8 ^ widi Animated numbers, music, 

fractions, decimals. 1-6 players. 
S20. 1-800-231-0937 CXI. 74. wait for 
operator. TX l-SOO-392-5468 ext. 74. 

TOP ALMOST FREE SOFTWARE! I! 

Big Package. Spreadsheet. Telecom. 
Word processing, etc. . . . IBM clones 

only. Disk 849^95. KIAH SYSTEMS. 
PO Box 1353, Washington. D.C. 20013 

We pay up to 8500 for programs 

We buy & sell CoCo software 

Send In for our free cat. A brochure 

Blue Walrus Programs. Box 1747. 
Eagle River. Wl 5452 1 

CoCoNut Software forTRS-80 Color 
Computer. Send SI to: Site 9. Bo.x 1 
R. R. 2. Tolicid. Alberta TOB 4J0 

SAVE 38% on Sollware III 

Davidson's Math Blaster 
Retall-S«9.9». Ourprice-$3«.9T. Free 
price list. Specify Apple. IBM, C 64. 
CREATIVE COMPUTER RESOURCES 

Box 728. Grand Haven. Ml 49417 
ADAM SOFTWARE & HARDWARE 
Cop>' Ulilitv. Fiome Budget. Games, etc. 
GREAT PRICES. Send 22C stamp for 
catalog to: E & T SOFTWARE, 
Box 821242. Dallas, TX 75382-1242 

FREE |r SOFTWARE CATALOG 

jrWARE 1986 CATALOG 

BOX 3141T; PATTON, OH 45431 

The TIME-EX programs for the 

Timcx products, write to: Fouad, 

799 Broadw-ay. 325C9. NYC 10003 

ATTENTION ALL ADAM OWNERS 
THE INVESTMENT ANALYST 

Compute P E ratios, F*rojccl future 
EPS & EPS growth. Track portfolio 
growth, and Maintain a transaction 
data base. Over 50K of Basic pgms. 

Dich 620 or DBP S23 [Check or M0| 

Blank LOFIAN DDP & SSDD a'A Disks 
•Disks - 10819 & DDP - 10/847" 

WE PAY SHIPPING / BASE for caialog 
MARATHON COMPUTER PRESS 

PQ BO.K 68503. VA Beach. VA 23455 

ADA.\[ SOFTWARE- LOW prices. Limited 

supplv. Send SASE to Terrvs Games. 

P.O. "box 1933. Ogdcn. Utah 84402 

FREE PROGRAMS C 64/- 4AnC.20TI-991BM 
CoCo/III/4/MClO/Tlmcx. Send stamps! 
Ezra. Box 5222JA. San Diego. CA 92105 

ADA.M or APPLE; GftAPHiCS II S39 
B-DESK: client file, mail printer; 
M-DESK: calculate, checkbook, budget: 
F-DE5K: idea organizer, file maker; 
S20 each, or all 3 on 1 , only S39. 
ADAM: Graph Pack-file, stats, 24x. S29: 
ShapeM: make rockets, animate, 829. 
ADAM/APPLE catalog for .44 stamps. 

NICKELODEON GRAPHICS. 
5640 W. Brown. Glendale. A7. 85302 



ATARI SOFTO'ARE CLOSE-OLT of a major 
company. Each package of 2 disks has 
up to 10 programs worlli almost SIOO. 
Now S9 per pack : Arcade Game Pack # 1 
or #2; Kids Games # 1 or #2: Educational; 
Data Ba.se ; Program mingTools # 1 or #2, 
Word Processor S 1 5. Graphics Design 
Pack 819. Game Designers Pack S19- 
+ S2sli.Visa'MC/check.Send81 Catalog 

COMPUTERS MADE SIMPLE 
438 12901 PI. N.E.. Bellexiic. WA 9SO05 

LOTTO PICKER 

Improve yotir chances for Mlll'nn- 
Dollar Jackpots! Picks LOTTO. 
Win-4 & Daily Numbers. All USA & 
Can. games included. Expandable! 
IBM/C64'TI.99 S35. Order ToU-Free 
1.800-341-1950 ExI. TT. By Mail: 
RIDGE 170 Broadway. #201-FC-01. NYC. 
NY 10038. Write for Irce catalog. 

NEW MACINTOSH SOFTWARE! Business.' 
Personal. Free catalog. Write DLS 
Software. FOB 829. Clifton. NJ 07015 



THE ENTREPRENEURS GAME 

Learn to run your own business. 
Start with a business plan. Raise 
capital. Go public. The key Is 
problem-solving. Bonus book Includ- 
ed FREE. Family fun and profit. 
Apple/IBM PC. S49.95. Order Now! 
AVANT-GARDE. 37B Commercial BK'd. 
Novalo. CA 94947: 1-800-874-6544 

ADAM SOFTWARE & HARDWARE 

SmarlSPELLER.Elecironic dtctioitarr 

locales & tlietks inissijclled ivords. etc. 839 
PawerPRINT'Prlnltng enliancflni«nt $34 
rast'FILER'Fiie management lyl. ,. $14 
PainlMASTER>High-Reselvtien Drawing 

& palming svstcm. Save feature. . 624 
TR/\CTOR-FEED ASSEMBLY. S79.95 
Dninp.ieks Preformatted ... S3. 50. . . I0.S3I 

ADAM Ribbons 85.50 3'S15 

64K MEMORY EXPANDER S69 

EXTRA DIGITAL DATA DRWZ . . . . S48 

NASHUA a'.i SSDD disks 10-pack 810 

Shipping 81.50 US.A-S3.50 Canada 

FREE Caloiag-Evcrylhing tar ADAM 

ALPHA-ONE LTD 

I ATI Eait 16lh St., Suite 146 

Dcpt. FC. Brooklyn. NT 1 1229 

FREE IBM Public-Domain Software 
with purchase of blank disks. For 
details 6f listing of programs send 
SASE to WINDWARD PUBLIC SOFrW/\RE. 
P.O. Box 4630. Kaneohe. HI 96744 

COMMODORE «4 & CI 28 
HOMEMATE Is a family package, a pow- 
erful graphic database, has address 
card file, home in\'entor>\ memo pad 
w/screen display mode. Format disk, 
scan dlrccton". search common fields 
& more! Plus 3 graphic games, Savage 
Hunt, Attack Polar 7.3 Card Molly. 
Disks, send 839.95. 
Also MIND-STORM, a colorful, 
graphic artiliclal intelligence program 

that will help boost concentration. 
Ages 8 vrs & up. Disks, send 824.95. 
SEARCHER SOFTWARE, Box 4901 1. 
Chicago. IL 60649-001 1 

• • • FREE SOFTWARE • • • 

IBM. COMMODORE, and Cp/M computers. 
For info send stamped envelope to; 
PUBLIC DOMAIN USERS GROUP, 

Box 1 442-FC. Orange Park. FL 32067 

T1-99/4A buy one program. 
gal two others freel Discounts 
on repeat orders. Adult Games! 
Business, Kids Games and morel 
Free Catalog. MORGAN SOFTWARE. 
Box 3452. Ann Arbor. Ml 48106 

PARENTS a TEACHERS 

MathTlash Cards. 720 skill levels. 
Print worksheets. ApplcC 64. 829.95. 
OL SW, Box 2433. Midland. Ml 4864 1 

Back up your protected IBM disks with 
CopvII PC. Available for Apple & C 64. 
835'ea. + S3 sih. RSD. Box 272, 
BrQn.ivllle. NY 10708 [SASE for Info) 

ADAM SOFTWATtE! 325 each: KopyKat. 

SmarlTYPE. or Librarv'. Send a SASE 

for info & AUG list. REEDY SOFTWAF-tE. 

10085 60th St.. Alto, MI 49302 

Supor-Prlcad C 64 Softwaro 

Pro-Writer. Database. Education. Music 
Games. Lotto. Finance & much more! 
All on 1 disk for only $14.95 + S2&1i- 
SOFTWORKS INC., 

P.O. Box 03950. Higliland Park. MI 49203 

4 BIG REASONS TO BUT 
Seltwara From Soft SourccR 

1. Top Apple. IBM Programs 

2. Games, educational, small business 
120-40% oIT) 

3. 3rd year of personalized service 

4. FREE shipping/brochure!! 

Soft Source-R. Dept. D. 
Box 2931. Jolict. IL 60434 

Learn typing/computer typing from 

ea.ssette & instruction sheet. Send 

87.95 to KevTech, 8825 S. 84 Ave.. 

Hickorv Hills. IL 60457. 



ADAM 15 Family Programi 

On disk or dpack. Send S 19.95 or SASE. 
ADAM-HACK PRODUCTIONS 

Dept. 10. Box 184. SeelvTille. IN 47878 



Save 30-35% on software for Apple. 

Atari, or Mac computers. FREE 

catalog (specify computer). Delson's 

Catalog. Box 1346. Canoga Park. CA 

91304. (8181887-5260 



Organize vour life as slmplv as vour 
desktop. IBM. Apple, C 64. SASE toTSC. 
1 Mill Creek Rd.. Mentonc. CA 92359. 



Pick Lotto numbers with your 
C 64. Send 88.00 Icheck or money 
order) I'or disk to NUMERICS. P.O". 
Box 892. Bayonne, NJ 07002-0892. 



TELECOMPUTING 



NATION-WIDE BULLETIN BOARD 
Phone #5. Send S3.95. Gai^- S. West. 
P.O. Box 55506. Washington d".C. 200! 1 



Have iHcoii lo oducallonal srvci. 

Attend an auction, do some shopping. 

All from your home computer. 

For free Information write to: 

Beckcrle. P.O. Box 33006. Dcp! 7. 

Northglen. CO 80233 



USED COMPUTERS/ 
SOFTWARE 



Now you can RENT SW for your IBM. 
Send SI for list to: RSD. Box 272, 
Bronxvllle. N.Y. 10708. 



BUYING OR SELLING A COMPUTUIT 

New or used! Let us do it for you! 
COMPUTER INTERCHANGE 

"A NATIONWIDE LISTING SERVICE." 
JUST CALL MON-SUN 8 a. m.-8 p.m. EST 
1.(800)631-548B INadonwIdel 
1.(8M) 35a-49S1 (In N.J.I 

Specify — Buyer or Seller 
P.O. Box 695. Springfield. NJ 07081 



USERS' CROUPS 



AMIGA USERS' GROUP 

Send Sie for Charter membership. 
Box 3761. Chen%' Hill. NJ 08034 
(609)667-2326 • VI SAMASTER—ADDSl 



PCjr Owner's FREE CATALOG 

Ind drive, memorj- expansion. 
Printers & Software at super prices 

Join the PC/r CROUP 
for best product selection & support 

Call the PC/r GROUP today! 
1800) 233-2203. in TX 1806) 799-0327 



COLiCO AtlAM OWNERS 
Do you need . . * 

1. Access to a complete line? (over 75 
products in stock) hardwarBsoftware? 

2. Technical information/Instruction 
& objective reviews of products via 
a MONTHLY newsletter? 

3. Free public domain software? 
Join the NIAD ADAM users' group & 
DISCOUNT buying ser^'lcc now! 

(formed November 1984) 
Now available (RS232 interface. 
80 column video. Iraclor-feedl 
SASE for Free info & catalog. 
NIAD. Box 1317. Lisle. IL 60532 



EVERY COMMODORE 64 FAMILY 
AND EVERY APPLE FAMILY 

should belong to this club. 

Whv? For free information vvrltc; 

DISK-A-MONTH CLUB 

Box 936, Ocean Sjirlngs, MS 39564 



Join the leading ADAM users' group 
#1 ADAM USERS' GROUP 

Receive "SPRITE CHASER" newslel ler. 
Advanced updating, evaluations on 
programs, hardware, technical 
information direct from Coleco. 
Problem-sohing— -prc^ram exchange- 
discount buying sen-Ice— etc. 
Send 815 for cliarter membership to: 
#1 ADAM USERS' CROUP 
Box 3T61 — Attnt Jny Forman 
Chcrrs' Hill, NJ 08034 
(609)667-2526-VISA*lASTER-,ADDSl 



JANUARY 1986 99 



ADVERTISER INDEX 
JANUARY FAMILY COMPUTING 



Advertiser 
Index 



Page 
No. 



Acllvlslon 54 

ADAM Net 96 

Almost Free Software 97 

Arrays Inc. Continental Software 5 

Asfilon-Tate 59 

Avant-Carde 30 

Capttai Software 96 

Coleeo Industries 76 

Commtxlore C4 

CompuServe Information Systems 34 

Data East 31 

Dow Jones News/Retrfeval 1 7 

Electronic Arts 27 

Epyx 20 

Extended Software Co. 95 

Family Discount Computer Products 32 

First Star Software 85 

FlschcrTechnlk 67 

Genesis Software 97 

GrolItT 73 



Advertlier 
Index 



Page 
Ho. 



Hallx Institute 

Hanania Enterprises. Ltd. 

Heath Co. 

Infocom 

Intelligent 

Ion 

Jensen Tools 

K-Soft 

K&S Universal 

Leading Edge 

Marymac Industries 

Meca 

Mlcroprose Software 

Mimic Systems Inc. 

Mindscape 

M-W. Ruth 

N.P.S. Inc. 

North Hills Corp. 

NRl/McGraw-HlU 

Okldaia 



93 

95 

21 

69 

93 

97 

96 

97 

96 

C2 

95 

6,7 

29 

2 

12, 13, 14, 15 

95 

96 

95, 96 

33 

78. 79 



Advertiser 
Index 



Page 

He. 



O.VV.l. 

Pinpoint (Virtual Comblnatlcsl 

Precision Data Products 

Press A Software 

Protecto Enterprizcs 

Quinsept. Inc. 

Radio Shack 

Scholastic Software 

Scholastic Production 

Spinnaker 

Star Micronics 

SubLOGlC 

Sun Hill Enterprises 

TAB (Computer Bk Club] 

Thompson Consumer Products 

Timeworks. inc. 

Tri Micro 

US Air Force 

USA-Flex 

World Book 



61 



22. 23, 



30 
91 
96 
95 

62. 63 
96 
11 
Bl 
71 

24, 25 
1 
53 
97 
65 
66 
19 
93 
C3 
59 
9 



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S 5 



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FAMILY COMPUTING 

P. 0. Box 2795 
Clinton, lA 52735 



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FAMILY COMPUTING 

P. O. Box 2795 
Clinton, lA 52735 







We'll pay you to take 
the most exciting classes anywhere* 



You'll leam electronics, avionics, aircraft 
maintenance, healthcare sciences, man- 
agement or logistics— the Air Force will 
train you in one of more than 200 technical 
specialties America needs today. 

You'll get hands-on experience with the 
latest equipment, and we'll pay 75% of your 
tuition for off-duty college courses, to get 
you even further. 



Whatever your goals, the Air Force will 
equip you with the skills to get where you 
want to be. 

If you're looking seriously into your 
future, Aim High to a future in the Air Force. 
Visit your Air Force recruiter today or call 

toll-free 1-800-423-USAF 

(in California 
1-800-232-USAF). 



HOWTOEVOU/E 
TO A HIGHER INTELLIGENCE. 



THE COMMODORE 128. 

The firsf step is buying the 
Commodore 128'" Personal Com- 
puter The smartest computer 
available for the price. It's like get- 
ting three computers for less 
than one usually costs. You con run 
CP/M® business software, the 
new programs written for the 128, 
and over 3,000 Commodore 64'-' 
programs. You start out with more 
software than most machines 
give you after years on the market. 




±iJ 



THE COMMODORE 128 
WORKS FASTER. 

To run all that software and run it 
faster, you'll want the 1571 Disk Drive. 
You can't find a faster drive at the 
price. It transfers nearly 1,000 words 
a second (5200 cps], so you con 
load most programs instantly 



THE COMMODORE 128 
GETS SMARTER. 

Now try improving your memon/. 
Plug in our 1750 RAM Expansion 
Module and your 128 moves up 
to a poweitui 51 2K. That's enough 
to handle just about anything you 
can dish out, from complicated 
business forecasting to giant 
data bases. 






^^^@ffl\ 



:^-:k- 



THE COMMODORE 128 
LEARNS TO COMMUNICATE. 

There's no real intelligence without 
the ability to communicate. So 
you'll want our 1670 Modem/1200. 
If puts you in touch with a new 
world of shopping, banking, 
communications and information 
over your telephone line. And it 
operates of a lightning-fast 1200 
baud to save on your phone bill. 




THE COMMODORE 128 
LEARNS TO WRITE. 

Looking good in print could be 
your next move with the MPS 1000 
Printer It's a new dot matrix 
printer designed to make the most 
of the 128's speed and high-reso- 
lution graphics. The MPS turns out 
about 1200 words a minute 
(100 cps) of draft-quality printing, or 
gives you near-ietter-quality at 
about 240 words a minute (20 cps). 



THE COMMODORE 128 
IMPROVES yOUR VISION. 

Brains aren't enough without good 
looks, so improve your vision with 
Commodore's new 1902 RGB Color 
Monitor The high-resolution screen 
gives you a sharper image and 
betfer color than your standard Ty 
so you can really appreciate the 
128's great graphics. 



All these evolutionan/ steps ahead won't set you back when it comes 

to paying for them. Additions to your Commodore 128 ore 

available at a store near you and are as affordable as the 128 itself. 

We think thafs a smart way to help you build a computer system. 

®CP/M ISO registered irademark^lDigiralReseorch. Inc f 19S5. Commodore ElecironicsLimiied 

COMMODORE 128^ PERSOHAL COMPUTER 

A Higher Intelligence